Written on: September 12, 2018
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If you get goosebumps listening to music, you’re more likely to be successful

People who get goosebumps are higher achievers, form stronger relationships and live happier, healthier lives, according to a new study.

New research says over half of people in the UK experience goosebumps during live entertainment, and those who do are healthier and more empathetic.

People who feel chills also tend to be more successful, achieving higher grades and earning 12 per cent more than those that don’t.

The study, carried out by Barclaycard, saw 100 UK participants watch a live performance while wearing a monitoring device, which tracked their heart rate and movement.

At the same time, the researchers carried out a series of tests to find out which participants experienced a ‘goosebump moment’, and what their reaction to the music might say about them.


Opera singer and music graduate crowned Miss America 2019

The new Miss America is an opera singer who has a Masters in music composition and plans to be a huge advocate for the arts.

Nia Franklin, an opera singer and music composition graduate, was crowned the 92nd Miss America at Sunday’s event in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Franklin also earned a Master’s degree in music composition from UNC School of the Arts.

In the Talent portion of the Finals, Franklin sang ‘Quando m’en vo’’ from Puccini’s La bohème. After being crowned Miss America, she sang a gospel song she wrote when she was five years old.

During the competition, Franklin described how music helped her find and grow comfortable with her identity.

“I grew up at a predominately Caucasian school and there was only five percent minority, and I felt out of place so much because of the colour of my skin,” Franklin said. “But growing up, I found my love of arts, and through music that helped me to feel positive about myself and about who I was.”

Franklin said she plans to be an activist for the arts during her tenure as Miss America.


A First for New York: New Conductors at the Met Opera and Philharmonic

For the first time in history, new music directors are arriving this season at both the New York Philharmonic and the Metropolitan Opera – a coincidence with the potential to transform the city’s music scene.

At the Met, the fall of James Levine amid allegations of sexual misconduct scrambled the company’s plans for passing the baton to Yannick Nézet-Séguin. This dynamic conductor was originally scheduled to take over in 2020, but Mr. Levine’s suspension and later firing forced the company into action. Mr. Nézet-Séguin, also the music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra, cut back some commitments in order to fully take on his duties at the Met this autumn.

At the Philharmonic, Jaap van Zweden was always meant to begin his tenure this month. Still, back when he was appointed in 2016, no one expected that his partner in the executive office would be Deborah Borda, who was lured away from the thriving Los Angeles Philharmonic.

Both these institutions have major transitions on the horizon, and it will be exciting to watch these new developments unfold on the New York scene.


Die Rückkehr des Mackie Messer

Im September kommt ein Film in die Kinos, der sich um die „Dreigroschenoper“ dreht: „Mackie Messer – Brechts Dreigroschenfilm“ von Joachim Lang. In den Hauptrollen: Lars Eidinger als Bertolt Brecht und Robert Stadlober als Kurt Weill. Den Macheath verkörpert Tobias Moretti und Joachim Król gibt den Peachum.

Joachim Langs Film erinnert manchmal an die beiden Lars-von-Trier-Filme „Dogville“ und „Mandalay“. Kein Wunder, denn Trier hatte sich in diesen Werken explizit auf Brechts „Verfremdungseffekt“ bezogen. Aber es soll hier nicht um den Lang-Film gehen, der gewissermaßen das „Making-of“ zeigt, sondern um die „Originale“: Erich Engels Theaterfassung der „Dreigroschenoper“ von 1928 und G. W. Pabsts Filmversion „Die Dreigroschenoper“.

Auch die „Dreigroschenoper“ ist kein warmherziges Theaterstück. Die Parole „Glotzt nicht so romantisch!“ hatte Brecht ans Publikum schon 1922 ausgegeben, als er bei der Uraufführung seines Stückes „Trommeln in der Nacht“ Plakate mit jenem Slogan im Zuschauerraum aufhängen ließ. Sie galt auch noch, als am 31. August 1928 die „Dreigroschenoper“ im Theater am Schiffbauerdamm Premiere hatte und nicht zuletzt dank der Musik von Kurt Weill ein Sensationserfolg wurde.

A new film arrives in  cinemas this Thursday, based on the collaboration of Kurt Weill and Bert Brecht for the “Threepenny Opera”.

A classic piece in every theatre repertoire, the new film tells of the life and works of Bertolt Brecht, as well as his most famous songs.

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