Posts Tagged ‘Arts Education’
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We are very happy to announce that we are working with Spitalfields Music Festival this year. Founded in 1976, this annual music festival is now in its 42nd year, bringing artists, audiences and the local community together to explore and share extraordinary music in the heart of East London.

In 2017, the festival received rave reviews from The Telegraph, The Guardian and the London Evening Standard, with the festival flagship project, Schumann Street! also winning a coveted RPS Award for Chamber Music and Song in 2018.

With André de Ridder returning as Artistic Curator for 2018, expect an exciting programme building on the success of 2017; programming authentic performances of classical masterpieces alongside bold new work from trailblazing contemporary musicians with collaborations that blur boundaries between musical genres.

Spitafields Music’s work is founded on three pillars: Perform, Create and Learn. Curating unforgettable live music experiences that put a new sound on classical music. Creating a platform for new and upcoming artists, nurturing their boldest and most insightful work and through their award-winning learning and participation programme which reaches over 5,000 each year across schools, libraries, care homes and community spaces.

Music’s mission is to provide high quality, relevant and inclusive opportunities for people across East London to engage with music as creators, performers and audiences.

We look forward to managing their PR campaign for 2018 and look forward to announcing the exciting line-up for this year’s festival in a month’s time!

In today’s news: Lenny Henry to narrate Peter and the Wolf, British Museum hosts music festival, violin duo mesh classical with hip-hop, German GEMA is generating more revenue than before, new Baroque Orchestra founded in Thuringia, a radio feature talks of a more female run industry, and the German Music Council is giving out 12 fellowships for conducting.

Classical Music

Lenny Henry to narrate Peter and the Wolf

Lenny Henry will narrate Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf on Friday 4 May with the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire Pops Orchestra.

Opera Now

International Opera Awards reveals winners

The sixth instalment of the glitzy awards celebrated top operatic talent while raising funds for the Opera Awards Foundation.

The Telegraph

Arts education should be the entitlement of every child

“The government is determined that all children develop artistically because high-quality arts education should not be the preserve of the elite, but the entitlement of every child.”

Broadway World

The British Museum Hosts First Major Music Festival

Taking place from 16th – 29th April 2018, ‘Europe and the world: a symphony of cultures’ will explore Europe’s interactions with the world and will strive to allow a dialogue between works of classical and contemporary music.

SCNow

Beats and Strings: Black Violin meshes classical music with hip-hop sounds

Kevin Sylvester and Wilner Baptiste grew up on hip-hop, so in time, they combined that love with their classical training to produce their own eclectic sound.

NMZ

GEMA stabilisiert Gesamteinnahmen mit Ertragsplus im Geschäftsjahr 2017

Die GEMA verzeichnet im Geschäftsjahr 2017 erneut einen Einnahmenzuwachs für ihre Mitglieder.

Pizzicato

Neues Barockorchester: Thüringer Bach Collegium

Im Bachland Thüringen – Bach hat die ersten 30 Jahre seines Lebens dort verbracht – wurde ein neues Barockorchester gegründet: das Thüringer Bach Collegium.

Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Wie das Musikbusiness weiblicher werden könnte

Ob auf Festivals, in den Charts oder auf Preisverleihungen: Die Musikwelt wird von Männern dominiert.

Deutscher Musikrat

12 neue Talente im Dirigentenforum

Das Förderprogramm des Deutschen Musikrates für den dirigentischen Nachwuchs nimmt acht Stipendiaten in den Förderzweig Orchesterdirigieren und vier in den Förderzweig Chordirigieren auf.

El Mundo

Baleares exige el catalán para tocar en la Orquesta Sinfónica

Los violinistas, chelistas, flautistas, trompetistas y clarinetistas de Baleares que no sepan catalán ya pueden irse con la música a otra parte que no sea la Orquesta Sinfónica de las Islas Baleares.

Corriere de la Serra

Teatro Regio, per sostituire Vergnano la sindaca punta su un amico di Grillo

Giancarlo Del Monaco, 75 anni, regista e dirigente di teatri d’opera, figlio del grande tenore Mario, sarà il nuovo sovrintendente del Regio.

Twitter

© Black Violin

(Written on April 11, 2018 )

Whilst most luthiers seem to be men, the shortlist for Menuhin Competition 2016, is dominated by females. In the Strad’s March 2013 issue, violin maker Ute Zahn asked why there are so few female violin makers. One might assume that it’s something to do with the machines and physical work required to make a violin. However Zahn concludes that violin making is for ‘anyone with patience, passion, aptitude and determination.’ These are also some of the requirements for violin playing; it is extraordinary that out of 22 entrants in the senior category, only one is male and in the junior section there are 15 girls and only seven boys. 

 Ziyu He, 16 is the only male candidate competing in the senior category. Although Austrian, he was born in and is representing China. He started playing at the age of five and since October 2011, Ziyu lives and studies in Salzburg at the Leopold Mozart Institute of the Mozarteum University.

Ziyu He/ esc-plus

Ziyu He/ esc-plus

There are seven candidates from South Korea in the senior category but could the winner come from the UK?  With two entrants this year, this is the highest number of British competitors for twenty years. Indeed in a letter to The Times earlier this week, Julian Lloyd Webber accused the government of trying to squeeze arts subjects out of schools. Certainly compared with China, Korea and Japan, it would seem that children in Britain are given fewer opportunities and encouragement to study music or take up a musical instrument. Schools have minuscule budgets for music education and simply can’t afford to provide children with instruments and regular music classes. James Rhodes, TV presenter and classical pianist makes the point that schools would never require students to bring their own footballs and rugby balls for sports classes. There is however one privileged primary school where every student owns a violin, this is the exception though!

Juliette Roos, 20 along with Louisa Staples, 15 and Mathilde Milwidsky, 21 are the three outstanding violinists who will be fighting it out in the senior category for the UK.

Roos was in the strings final for BBC Young Musician 2012, she won her first prize at the age of six and has performed as soloist, in orchestra, chamber ensembles and in masterclasses ever since.

The 2016 Menuhin Competition takes place at Royal Academy of Music, London from 7-17 April. It is Yehudi Menuhin’s Centenary; the 11 day festival features major concerts from London’s best orchestras and international soloists celebrating all things Menuhin. Given the unprecedented number of females shortlisted for this year’s competition, it looks likely that a girl will win. What does the next one hundred years of the Menuhin’s legacy have in store for us?

 

 

(Written on January 8, 2016 )

On Wednesday evening, the WildKat London team were pleased to attend The Culture Debate in the Linbury Studio Theatre at the Royal Opera House. The debate, organised by the Creative Industries Federation and live streamed by BBC Arts, allowed members from arts industries to question representatives from the UK’s major political parties on their policies. Culture Minister Ed Vaizey and Deputy Labour Leader Harriet Harman were joined by the Martin Dobson, Baroness Bonham-Carter and Peter Whittle, and the debate was chaired by Martha Kearney.

Investment

After hearing from the speakers, social media feeds were overwhelmed with comments about the amount of consensus occurring. All spokespeople professed their support for the arts, but without any real attention towards how key issues can be addressed. In an audience full with teachers, CEOs of PR and advertising agencies and young people new to the sector, many participants gladly shared their own experiences with the panel: mainly highlighting the lack of support they felt they had received from the government.

Untitled

Although we heard about the £7.7 billion that the arts contribute to the economy each year, and the fact that funding in Germany and Sweden has increased every year for the last 7 years in comparison, questions at the beginning of the debate “why say – we love you; here’s less?” were continually avoided. Many of the stories from individuals, including teachers, who had struggled and left their jobs because they felt there was no room for creativity, were dismissed as “anecdotal” by Ed Vaizey. Helpfully, Harriet Harman was able to provide some more evidence of the decline in arts subjects within schools, and followers took to social media to provide some more interesting statistics. The ISM, for instance, cited that in 2007 61,000 pupils studied music for GCSE, whilst in 2014 this had dropped to 47,000 pupils. Baroness Bonham-Carter’s reference to an “inspirational drama teacher” at Eton also irritated the audience, seeming, as Caroline Crampton from the New Statesmen wrote: “to skate over the other benefits private education brings.”

SATS and ArtsEducation remained a great focus of the debate. Ed Vaizey claimed that he does see art as being at the forefront of much primary education, whilst Harriet Harman continued to address the issue that equal opportunities are not provided to children in schools. This was mentioned as an issue within and outside of London, and one that was not addressed with any clear strategy. UKIP’s answer to this was to increase the amount of grammar schools, however as Caroline Crampton tweeted “It is not clear what this does for the arts”. When the conversation moved on to unpaid internships and the cost of living in London, everyone was yet again stuck for any form of solution, most notably Baroness Bonham-Carter, who could only agree with the statement.

Arts

Internships

 

The question of how far we should rely on schools to promote culture was also raised. As Londoners benefit from £69 of arts funding per head, compared with £4.50 in the rest of the country, how can we expect every school to perform equally in the arts? Points about creativity were also raised by the audience more generally. Creativity needs to be applied to our working lives, not merely encouraged vaguely in infant years, and then forgotten about.

Videogames

This Culture Debate left many questions unanswered. Whilst it is difficult to quantify the monetary value of culture on a city or town and its inhabitants, the most pressing question for us was highlighted by Louise Jury, the Evening Standard’s Chief Arts Correspondent, after the debate: “if the arts generate so much revenue, why is it so impossible to invest in them?”

Let’s hope we will not be having an identical conversation in 4 years’ time.

photo-8

(Written on April 10, 2015 )