Posts Tagged ‘brass’
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In today’s news: Orchestra of the Swan announces volunteering opportunities, and Karen Bradley has been reappointed as culture secretary. Plans for new season at the Pierre Boulez Hall Berlin, and Händel Festival in Halle. Yeakwoon Sunwoo wins Van Cliburn Gold Medal, and female brass band raises cash for breast cancer.

Classical Music Magazine

Orchestra of the Swan announces volunteering opportunities

The Orchestra of the Swan (OOTS) is holding an event to enable those interested to learn about volunteering opportunities and the ensemble itself.

Music Week

Karen Bradley reappointed as culture secretary

Karen Bradley has been reappointed as culture secretary in Theresa May’s reshuffled cabinet.

Classic FM

Tokio Myers, winner of Britain’s Got Talent 2017, speaks exclusively to Classic FM

Pianist Tokio Myers has just been crowned the winner of Britain’s Got Talent 2017 and wowed the judges with his musical mash-ups where Debussy meets Ed Sheeran, and Craig Armstrong meets Hanz Zimmer (sic) and Rag N Bone Man

FAZ

Die Ministerin lässt nicht locker

Die Kampagne der nationalistischen Kulturministerin Miri Regev gegen unliebsame Künstler trifft eine israelische Institution: Das Theaterfestival in Akko droht zu scheitern.

Tagesspiegel

Alles ausprobieren, was möglich ist

Eine Jazz-Reihe von Till Brönner, Musik aus dem Nahen Osten, Szenisches von Robert Wilson: Daniel Barenboim und Ole Baekhoej blicken auf die nächste Saison im Pierre Boulez Saal.

NMZ

Orgelnacht und Messiah – Händel-Festspiele locken Zehntausende an

Halle – Rund 50 000 Musikliebhaber haben in diesem Jahr die Händel-Festspiele in Halle besucht. Insgesamt lockten seit dem 26. Mai rund 100 Veranstaltungen, wie eine Sprecherin des Festivals am Sonntag sagte.

Pizzicato

Yeakwoon Sunwoo Wins Van Cliburn Gold Metal (sic)

The Fifteenth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition announced its winners.

BBC.com

Boobs and Brass: The female band raising cash for breast cancer

In 2006, two friends decided to break the male dominance of the brass band world by forming an all-female band – and called it Boobs and Brass.

Twitter

Help Musicians @HelpMusiciansUK: Jenny Wade discusses the perseverance of women within the electronic music scene. #WomeninMusic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNq91U99Ot0

 

: Wir sind stolz, dass am 24. Juni 2017 die vierte Auflage der in den Geschäften der Qualitätsroute stattfinden kann!

Orgelnacht und Messiah – Händel-Festspiele locken Zehntausende an. Foto: Thomas Ziegler, Presse

 

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(Written on June 12, 2017 )

Today, the WildKat London office share our favourite symphonies.

Victoria: Mozart’s Symphony No. 40, composed 1788.

“It was one of the first symphonies I heard, it was also one of the first pieces of classical music to send a shiver down my spine!”

It is sometimes referred to as the “Great G minor symphony”, to distinguish it from the “Little G minor symphony”, No. 25. The two are the only minor key symphonies Mozart wrote. 

Fleur: Mahler’s  Symphony No. 4,  composed in 1899 and 1900.

“It was one of the first symphonies I performed at school so it has a special place in my heart – the beginning of the 3rd movement is epic and almost un-Mahler-like but still so clever.”

Symphony No. 4 is characterised as one of Mahler’s most accessible symphonies, being the shortest and most lightly scored, with less heavy brass and a smaller string section. The final movement is based on Mahler’s orchestral setting of the song ‘Das Himmlische Leben’, composed in 1892.


Ellie also chooses a Mahler Symphony, Symphony No. composed in 1901 and 1902.

Mahler completed this Symphony during one of the happiest periods of his life. During the winter prior to beginning the Fifth Symphony, Mahler had met Alma Schindler to whom he proposed in 1901. It is said that in the tender, lyrical Adagietto of the fourth movement, Mahler expresses his love for Alma.

Olivia: Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6. composed in 1808.

“The context of the music shines through very much and you can really feel Beethoven’s emotions. It’s more programme music – telling a story – and it’s perfect for new audiences.”

Last year, Orpheus Sinfonia presented Revolution: The Beethoven Effect which explored Beethoven’s symphonies and how they transformed our view of what a symphony is. Music from his symphonies was performed alongside images, and  readings of excerpts from his letters. The orchestra really delved into the details to make a fascinating event!

 Sarah: Janáček’s Sinfonietta, composed 1926.

Janáček dedicated the Sinfonietta to the “Czechoslovak Armed Forces”. He wanted it to express “contemporary free man, his spiritual beauty and joy, his strength, courage and determination to fight for victory.” The music depicts scenes from Janáček’s home city of Brno following the announcement of Czech independence. 

Amelia: Richard Strauss’ Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks, composed 1894-95.

This music tells the adventures of Till Eulenspiegel, a German peasant folk hero. In modern German, the name means “owl glass,” or “owl mir­ror,” however in the middle ages when the tales were collected, the name had a more sinister meaning as the owl was sometimes regarded as the devil’s bird. Eulenspiegel was a trickster and the music cleverly captures his mischief and roguishness. 

(Written on October 26, 2015 )

If you look back at our daily news page on our website, it is not an exaggeration when I say that in the last few weeks almost every day there has been a news story about Sir Simon Rattle. Everyone has had their say on the concert hall rumours and now it is time for WildKat PR to add to the debate with our take on the whole issue.

I have always liked Simon Rattle, maybe it is because my grandparents, who live in Birmingham, are regulars at the Symphony Hall and talked about him when he was at the CBSO, maybe it is his musicianship, or maybe it is our mutual love for Mahler. Either way, I would love to see him back in London after he leaves his post as Principal Conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic in 2018. But what of his concert hall demands? It is generally accepted that London lacks a world class concert hall in terms of acoustics when compared to the likes of Amsterdam’s Concertgebouw and Berlin’s Philharmonie. It seems a bit of an oxymoron to have our prestigious orchestras housed in halls that have been described as a ‘complete joke’ by some musicians in terms of acoustics and backstage facilities. So, Rattle’s suggestion is not entirely unreasonable in this sense.

Rattle Picture

Photo: Sipa Press / Rex Features

However, as Ivan Hewett commented in The Times, it is not that the acoustics in London are bad, others are just better. Just talking about acoustics only provides one part of the story and does not take into account the psychological factors when listening to a performance: the emotions we feel and pictures the music conjures up. We do not want the acoustic question to veil the actual music. There is a special something about our concert halls in London which implants itself when you come to a concert here: their history, the grandeur of the building itself and the thrill of who else has performed on that stage. Can you imagine the Proms anywhere else other than the Royal Albert Hall? Pageantry and tradition is something the UK has perfected and our existing concert halls are a part of this.

There is a political side to all of this too. I must admit that part of me agrees with Jessica Duchen, that much of George Osborne’s commitment to a ‘feasibility study’ is probably General Election talk to get us all on side. With the economy still in a tight spot, spending however many millions on a new concert hall is not sensible. Indeed, Charlotte Higgins argued that if we need to spend any money on a new music venue in London, it needs to be a Glyndebourne-esque space for the crisis stricken English National Opera.

And then there is the question of its location. Where in central London is both available and suitable?

As much as I would love to see Sir Simon back in London, building a whole new concert hall seems hard to justify in these times especially when some say the acoustic argument is exaggerated. Spending the money on music education instead sounds like a better idea. If, after May, the new government uphold this enthusiasm then perhaps the idea will be taken more seriously but, how likely this is is left to be seen.

Rattle Blog Pic

Illustration: Robert G Fresson

 

(Written on February 25, 2015 )

We recently caught up with Nicole Wilson, the Founder of Musical Orbit, a new and exciting online service which provides online one-to-one lessons with top principal orchestral musicians as well as free webinars and masterclasses. Watch as she tells us about the inspiration behind the website and how she sees it developing in the future!

Keep up to date with Musical Orbit through their website, Facebook and Twitter.

(Written on February 19, 2015 )

After much anticipation, the website which offers personal one-to-one lessons, webinars and masterclasses with some of the best principal orchestral players in the world is up and running! Alongside being able to sign up for lessons, Musical Orbit is hitting the ground running with a string of very exciting, and varied, free webinars during February, the first being this evening (4th February 2015).

Join the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra’s principal trumpet player, Mark O’Keeffe, from 8:30-9:30pm to hear him talk about orchestral trumpet playing and answering all your questions about technique, the glory of being a section leader of a major orchestra or indeed anything else related. It promises to be a fascinating and well-spent evening. Make sure you sign up in plenty of time to secure your place on what is already proving to be a popular webinar.

If you should miss tonight’s discussion, tomorrow’s webinar is another treat not to be missed. Maxine Kwok-Adams, first violinist in the London Symphony Orchestra will talk all things fashion and looking good on stage. Describing herself on her Twitter as ‘never knowingly underdressed’, Maxine will bring personality, flair and experience to her webinar to walk us through her best outfits for concerts and the technicalities of wearing certain fashions whilst performing. All this will help you to hone your all round performance skills.

As if this is not enough, log on between 6-7pm on 9th February to hear freelance principal oboist Matthew Draper offering us his expertise on reed making. Understanding how your instrument is made is key to maintaining it and playing well so bassoonists, clarinetists, oboists and anyone interested in what makes a first class reed, be sure to join in!

Other February highlights include overcoming performance anxiety by expert in the field, Mike Cunningham on the 8th; ‘Life as a freelance opera singer’ by Graeme Danby on the 9th February; and ‘Being a principal player’ with cellist Louisa Tuck of the Royal Northern Sinfonia on the 21st .

Details of new webinars are regularly uploaded so keep checking Musical Orbit’s website, Facebook and Twitter for the latest information. Best of all, they are completely free!

musical-orbit-logoMusical Orbit

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Written on February 4, 2015 )

Classical News

The Telegraph

Myung-Whun Chung, interview: when music is life or death

Conductor Myung-Whun Chung doesn’t know if the North Korean musicians he worked with are alive or dead. He talks to Adam Sweeting.

The Independent

Proms 2014: Why the Proms are losing their director Roger Wright

This year’s concerts will feature the starriest names in classical music. But in the background is the sudden departure of director Roger Wright. We reveal the real reasons for his exit.

Classic FM

Cello implodes during recording session: video

A video showing a cellist’s instrument falling to pieces in her hands has been posted to YouTube.

The Telegraph

Nicola Benedetti: ‘I’ve been given a great gift in my life’

Her talent as a violinist is undisputed, but Benedetti made her way to the top thanks to a ferocious work ethic, and a passion for classical music that she wants a whole new generation to share.

Classical-Music.com

BBC Proms Inspire Young Composers’ Competition winners announced

Six young composers will have their works performed at the Proms.

Classical-Music.com

Yamaha calls for brass and woodwind scholarship candidates

Yamaha Music Foundation Europe prepares to launch the next generation of wind players.

New York Times

Divas Ready for Another Stage

After All the Arias, Opera Singers Look to the Stage and Screen.

Die Welt

Kurt Masur: “Es gibt für mich nur eins: Weitermachen”

Kurt Masur geht es nicht gut. Er hat Parkinson, erholt sich nur schwer von einer Hüftoperation und hat sein erstes Konzert danach vom Rollstuhl dirigiert. Aber: Ans Aufhören denkt er nicht.

Tagesspiegel

Mozart und Muezzin: Oper in Israel

Israel ist für vieles bekannt, nicht unbedingt für Oper. Aber auch die gibt es hier, allerdings muss sie immer wieder hart errungen werden. Eine Reise ans Tote Meer und nach Akko.

Twitter

Janet Horvath: ‏‪@playinglesshurt  #Saving ‪#Classical Music: An App for That?  ‪http://www.interlude.hk/front/saving-classical-music-an-app-for-that/#.U7Vf8kDO5qZ.twitter …

GoClassical: ‪@GoClassicalUK The practice of practising and how it works ‪http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/culture/stephenhough/100070997/the-practice-of-practising/ … ‪#piano ‪#classicalmusic

Classical Music@ClassicalM How to be a professional triangle player, with Eric Hopkins of the Utah Symphony ‪http://www.snsanalytics.com/ASpCy3 

 

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Myung-Whun Chung at a Festival in France

Photo: The Telegraph, Gerard Julien/AFP

(Written on July 7, 2014 )

Trumpeter and composer Paul Higgs’ new album Pavane is out now in the US, with a UK release later this week.

Pavane is an expression of Paul’s belief that genre boundaries shouldn’t be restrictive and combines the freedom of jazz with the rich sonorities of classical music. It presents pieces in song form in a classical style with an emphasis on melody and counterpoint. An exquisitely formed eleven-track collection, it boasts influences that range from Elgar to Latin Bass.

Pavane’s UK release is next Thursday 30th January and will be available from Amazon and iTunes. For more information, please see Paul’s website: www.paulhiggs.com

(Written on January 27, 2014 )

The Telegraph

Group perfoms Icelandic hymn in German train station

YouTube video shows Icelandic indie-folk group spontaneously burst into song in Wuppertal station, west Germany

Charlotte Church: female pop stars told ‘take clothes off, show you’re an adult’

Charlotte Church has criticised the music industry as she said young women were being coerced into using sexual imagery to sell their records

AZ Family

Tent City inmates treated to classical music concert

PHOENIX — The magic of Mozart was brought to inmates at Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s Tent City Sunday afternoon.

Minnesota Daily

Bill would change orchestra ownership

The bill, authored by Phyllis Kahn, would make the Minnesota Orchestra publicly owned

Music Industry News

Yamaha trumpets new instruments

Yamaha unveiled the newest instruments in its Xeno range of trumpets to over 90 VIP Yamaha brass and woodwind dealers from 16 European countries

Tech Radar

Spotify has 20 million songs, but 20% have never been played

Internet music streaming giant has huge catalogue, yet 4 million songs have still to be played

The Guardian

Music events pulled in 6.5 million people to tune of £2.2bn last year

Visit Britain report shows overseas visitors made up 6% of punters but accounted for 20% of money spent attending festivals and gigs

HMV can learn from Rough Trade when it comes to music retail

With its focus on curation and creating a destination store, the independent chain proves there’s more to selling than price

Der Tagesspiegel

Mehr Demokratie hören

Einst umstritten, heute Ikone: Vor 50 Jahren wurde die Berliner Philharmonie eingeweiht. Hans Scharoun hatte erfolgreich für seinen visionären Konzertsaal gekämpft. Eine Zeitreise

The Telegraph

The Telegraph

(Written on October 15, 2013 )

Faster Than Sound, the pioneering experimental series based at Aldeburgh Music’s facilities in Snape Maltings, Suffolk, brought one of its exciting projects to London last week.

Brainwaves, by Mira Calix and Anna Meredith combines science, visual art and music to explore the connections inspired by the brain and sound.

Visit the BBC News website to watch an interview with the composers as they prepared for the performance at London’s Wilton’s Music Hall last Friday.

The next event in the Faster Than Sound calendar features a specially commissioned work from the award-winning Christian Marclay on October 1st, when he will collaborate with the composer, performer and improviser Steve Beresford and a local brass band.

You can also check out this video of behind the scenes footage from the Brainwaves residency at Aldeburgh Music’s facilities at Snape Maltings.

 

(Written on August 2, 2011 )