Posts Tagged ‘Christopher Alder’
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Wir freuen uns sehr auf unsere kommende Zusammenarbeit mit dem russischen Komponisten und Pianisten Yury Kunets.

Als gefeierter Komponist lässt sich Yury Kunets von den Welten der Klassik-, Jazz- und Popmusik inspirieren, um vielfältige und inspirierende Musik zu schaffen. Er selbst beschreibt seine musikalische Herkunft wie folgt:

„Es waren die russischen Komponisten wie Tschaikowski, Schostakowitsch und Rachmaninow, die deutsch-österreichischen Größen wie Mozart, Bach und Beethoven, aber auch Jazz-Legenden wie Herbie Hancock, Stevie Wonder oder Al Jarreau, die meinen Stil maßgeblich beeinflussten. Ich wollte große Symphonien komponieren. Sie sollten unverkennbar die Handschrift meiner Herkunft tragen und dennoch internationales Format besitzen.“

1957 geboren und aufgewachsen in dem südostukrainischen Bergarbeiter-Städtchen Perwomajsk, schenkte ihm sein Onkel bereits im Kindesalter ein Akkordeon, auf dem er pausenlos spielte. In der achten Klasse war er Pianist und Komponist der schuleigenen Band. Anstatt anschließend auf das Konservatorium zu wechseln, musste er zuerst seinen Militärdienst leisten.

Im Jahr 1980 kam Kunets jedoch zur Musik zurück und schloss die Kulturhochschule im ukrainischen Tschernigow mit einem Doktor der Musikpädagogik ab. Die darauf folgenden zehn Jahre arbeitete er als Orchesterleiter in der sibirischen Stadt Surgut und tourte außerdem mit seiner ersten Band „Impuls Five“ durch Russland und Europa.

Als er den Autor und Regisseur Maxim Kapitanovsky traf und anfing an einzelnen Projekten mit ihm zu arbeiten, nahm seine Karriere eine neue Wendung ein. Zusammen produzierten sie zwei Musicalfilme, „Blame it all on the Beatles” für den russischen Fernsehsender Rossiya und „Don’t Shoot The Musicians.“

Seither komponiert Kunets insbesondere instrumentale Musik und lässt die Öffentlichkeit durch CD-Aufnahmen daran teilhaben. Zuletzt arbeitete er mit dem amerikanischen, preisgekrönten Dirigenten Lee Holdridge und dem britischem Grammy-Gewinner und Produzenten Christopher Alder zusammen. 2011 spielten sie „Renaissance“ mit dem Wroclaw Score Orchestra ein, 2014 produzierten sie die symphonische CD „Dedication“ beim Label Solo-Musica.

Kunets Komposition ‚Autumn’. Produziert von Chris Alder, dirigiert und orchestriert von Lee Holdridge. 

WildKat unterstützt Yury Kunets in den kommenden Monaten bei der Präsentation und Kontaktaufnahme zur internationalen Film- und Werbeindustrie. Darüber hinaus freuen wir uns die Promotion seiner nächsten CD zu übernehmen, die im Spätherbst 2018 veröffentlicht wird.

(Written on July 11, 2018 )

WildKat PR are delighted to announce the launch of an exciting and innovative new scheme heralded by our founder Kathleen Alder. The Noted Innovation Fellowship focuses on providing support to talented 22-35 year olds with original ideas in the area of arts administration which will shake up, progress and lead the classical music industry and culture sector into the future; it needs more than just artists.

Whilst there are many funding opportunities dedicated to discovering and supporting new performing talent, Kathleen has recognised a clear need in the industry for financial support to be awarded to young professionals keen to make their mark behind-the-scenes. Currently, aspiring arts prodigies are most likely to be supported by those who have had over 20 years’ experience and although their experience is vital and appreciated, Kathleen believes there is much more untapped potential to attract fresh new talent.

As well as offering £3,500 to help implement the recipient’s idea, the Fellowship will provide industry opportunities and mentorship by some of the most high profile names working for prestigious organisations such as Executive Producer of Opus Arte/Royal Opera House Ben Pateman; Grammy award winning music producer Christopher Alder; and Suzanne Davidson, the Executive Director of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. The list continues to grow. Alongside the standard prize winnings, the Fellowship will be customized around the individual and their idea in order to maximize their full potential.  With this Fellowship, Kathleen aims to educate and inspire a new generation of diverse and creative cultural leaders.

WildKat PR are excited for the talent that will emerge from this venture.

For application details, click here. The deadline is midnight (GMT) on 15th February 2015.

Kat1-11-590x260 Kathleen Alder. Photo: International Arts Manager 

 

(Written on January 13, 2015 )

This week’s Industry Idols interviewee is Christopher Alder, the Grammy-award-winning freelance music producer and former executive producer of Deutsche Grammophon.

What are the first, most important steps a young artist needs to take when they embark on their career as a performer?

A musician needs to be brutally honest with themselves about identifying what they are good at and concentrating on that particular area. Too many artists play certain works for no other reason than they think they should be playing such-and-such a composer or the piece has to be part of a serious artist’s repertoire. Singers seem to be the most endangered – I am constantly meeting fine singers, even very famous ones, who are talking about performing a role which is obviously not 100% suitable for their voice! A young artist must find a way to perform their chosen repertoire, even if it is only at small venues, schools, provincial towns…. and if they are any good they will eventually find a management willing to take them on.

What was your first job in the music industry?

While a post-graduate student at the Hamburg music conservatory I helped arrange music for a small ensemble in the Deutsches Schauspielhaus for a theatre piece. I was there in various functions for 2 years. My first real job was as a tape editor at Deutsche Grammophon in Hannover, and they also taught me a lot about the engineering side of recording.

What skills do you think are needed to succeed in the music industry?

I am a great believer in Emerson’s comment  “Nothing astonishes men so much as common sense and plain dealing.”  To pragmatism and honesty I would add optimism. These three are the rarest attributes in our industry (as they are in all of the arts) and the combination of all of them is unbeatable. They can be learnt, even optimism. The first two require courage. Creativity is necessary, but there is no shortage of creative people in the arts (the artists for a start) and it is a skill you can ‘buy in’.

What’s the most important thing you’ve learnt during your career?

Don’t cut corners. People will normally pay for quality and on the rare occasions they won’t you still have had pleasure in your work.

What do you enjoy most about your job?

Working with great musicians and listening to great music in lovely places.

On a typical working day, what’s the first thing you do when you get into the office?

If ‘on location’ the hall where we are recording and the control room are my office. I am there before the musicians arrive and I first go into the hall and greet the engineer,stage staff, the people who I depend on for things to run smoothly.
If at home for post-production, the first thing I do is write a list of who I need to phone and what I have to decide that day, then sit and edit whatever project I am working on. Listening to music in a concentrated way is much easier for me in the morning. After a couple of hours I need a break and that is when I address the things I wrote on my list.

Do you think there is anything in the classical music industry that needs to be changed? If yes, why?

We should always be thinking of how to change things… Life is change and the arts should reflect that. Our business shouldn’t be foreseeable.

Are there any young musicians, emerging venues, exciting companies, composers… etc that you are keeping your eye on?

No, my days of actively scouting for young talent are over. Many young artists contact me for advice or in conjunction with recording and I hear quite a few in concert. The ones I like I vaguely follow but I admit I pay much more attention to mature artists.

Where do you read about classical music?

I have google news alerts for many artists I work with or am interested in. I read the Süddeutsche Zeitung, arts pages online of the FAZ, Salzburger Nachrichten,  FT, Guardian, and NY Times and Gramophone magazine.

Where is your favourite place in the world for classical music?

For the whole aesthetic package it must be Vienna. Despite the lack of exciting new productions at the State Opera there is a single-mindedness in the serious enjoyment of quality performances that is unique there. The Musikvereinssaal, Brahmssaal, Mozartsaal and Konzerthaus, the Opera House and the Theater an der Wien – no other city has halls like these, nor such an informed and opinionated public.

(Written on November 10, 2010 )

This week’s Industry Idols interviewee is Christopher Alder, the Grammy-award-winning freelance music producer and former executive producer of Deutsche Grammophon.

What are the first, most important steps a young artist needs to take when they embark on their career as a performer?

A musician needs to be brutally honest with themselves about identifying what they are good at and concentrating on that particular area. Too many artists play certain works for no other reason than they think they should be playing such-and-such a composer or the piece has to be part of a serious artist’s repertoire. Singers seem to be the most endangered – I am constantly meeting fine singers, even very famous ones, who are talking about performing a role which is obviously not 100% suitable for their voice! A young artist must find a way to perform their chosen repertoire, even if it is only at small venues, schools, provincial towns…. and if they are any good they will eventually find a management willing to take them on.

What was your first job in the music industry?

While a post-graduate student at the Hamburg music conservatory I helped arrange music for a small ensemble in the Deutsches Schauspielhaus for a theatre piece. I was there in various functions for 2 years. My first real job was as a tape editor at Deutsche Grammophon in Hannover, and they also taught me a lot about the engineering side of recording.

What skills do you think are needed to succeed in the music industry?

I am a great believer in Emerson’s comment  “Nothing astonishes men so much as common sense and plain dealing.”  To pragmatism and honesty I would add optimism. These three are the rarest attributes in our industry (as they are in all of the arts) and the combination of all of them is unbeatable. They can be learnt, even optimism. The first two require courage. Creativity is necessary, but there is no shortage of creative people in the arts (the artists for a start) and it is a skill you can ‘buy in’.

What’s the most important thing you’ve learnt during your career?

Don’t cut corners. People will normally pay for quality and on the rare occasions they won’t you still have had pleasure in your work.

What do you enjoy most about your job?

Working with great musicians and listening to great music in lovely places.

On a typical working day, what’s the first thing you do when you get into the office?

If ‘on location’ the hall where we are recording and the control room are my office. I am there before the musicians arrive and I first go into the hall and greet the engineer,stage staff, the people who I depend on for things to run smoothly.
If at home for post-production, the first thing I do is write a list of who I need to phone and what I have to decide that day, then sit and edit whatever project I am working on. Listening to music in a concentrated way is much easier for me in the morning. After a couple of hours I need a break and that is when I address the things I wrote on my list.

Do you think there is anything in the classical music industry that needs to be changed? If yes, why?

We should always be thinking of how to change things… Life is change and the arts should reflect that. Our business shouldn’t be foreseeable.

Are there any young musicians, emerging venues, exciting companies, composers… etc that you are keeping your eye on?

No, my days of actively scouting for young talent are over. Many young artists contact me for advice or in conjunction with recording and I hear quite a few in concert. The ones I like I vaguely follow but I admit I pay much more attention to mature artists.

Where do you read about classical music?

I have google news alerts for many artists I work with or am interested in. I read the Süddeutsche Zeitung, arts pages online of the FAZ, Salzburger Nachrichten,  FT, Guardian, and NY Times and Gramophone magazine.

Where is your favourite place in the world for classical music?

For the whole aesthetic package it must be Vienna. Despite the lack of exciting new productions at the State Opera there is a single-mindedness in the serious enjoyment of quality performances that is unique there. The Musikvereinssaal, Brahmssaal, Mozartsaal and Konzerthaus, the Opera House and the Theater an der Wien – no other city has halls like these, nor such an informed and opinionated public.

(Written on November 10, 2010 )