Posts Tagged ‘church’
« Back to E-News

Over the past few weeks there has been uproar within the classical music world after the National Musicians Church, St Sepulchre-without-Newgate in Holborn, announced it would no longer be taking bookings of a non-religious nature from 2018.

The Church is where Sir Henry Wood, founder of the BBC Proms, is buried. It is also the home to a book of remembrance for musicians and windows commemorating singer Dame Nellie Melba and composer John Ireland. It has been known as the National Musicians Church for more than 70 years and is a prominent concert venue and rehearsal space that has been used by all types of musicians. Assurance had to be provided in 2013, after the appointment of Reverend David Ingall to the church, as many musicians were worried that the new priest would change the ethos of St Sepulchre as it was known. The recent move has therefore proven the need for this worry and has sparked a coming together of influential musicians to try and prevent the ban.

Since the new appointment of Reverend Ingall, the church has become part of the network founded by evangelical church Holy Trinity Brompton. The ‘evangelical group is known for its youth friendly rock-band style of worship’ and hosts the ever popular Alpha courses.  Reverend Ingall has stated in response to the reaction to the new ban; “Our ministry as the National Musicians’ Church continues to be a core part of our church’s identity and vision… While its expression may be changing, that underlying vision remains unchanged.” This, however, hasn’t settled the minds of leading musicians who believe that the “abrupt move was made without consent.”

In response to the ban on secular bookings, Richard Robbins started a petition to try and reverse the decision. He stated that “the church was particularly valued by musicians because of its heritage and for practical reasons.” He is helping to form a committee to “put forward a positive vision of what the Musicians Church actually is and to try and find a way that both music and ministry can co-exist together in a very open way.”

Photo credit: Making Music

This has consequently led to more than 50 musicians, including top composers, performers, and directors of music at cathedrals, to write a letter to The Guardian protesting against St. Sepulchre’s plans to ban non-sacred concerts. In the letter they state; “the unique ‘mission’ for St. Sepulchre’s has been to musicians, providing a welcoming space and encouraging them to be involved in running the parish. That its custodies are now willing to abandon this unique national cultural remit is difficult to understand and harder to accept.” Among those who signed the letter were Sir James MacMillan, John Rutter, Suzi Digby, Julian Lloyd Webber and Judith Weir.

Reverend Ingall has stated that “in the coming weeks we will reflect and pray, and consult with members of the musicians’ community about how best to fulfil that ministry moving forward.” The final outcome has not been announced yet, but we can hope that the hard work of Richard Robbins to start the petition and the influential musicians pays off.

Update: Over 7,000 people have signed the petition. Read all updates here.

(Written on August 29, 2017 )

In today’s news: Mass resignation of the Presidential Committee on the Arts and Humanities, Outrage as St Sepulchre’s stops taking bookings from musicians, and what tune does Big Ben chime? Bebersee Festival to open with family concert, Dudamel’s tour in Venezuela has been cancelled, and Andreas Ambühl has to give up music career.

The Times

La Scala’s Riccardo Chailly: how to run an opera house with a diva of an audience

Riccardo Chailly, music director of La Scala, explains how he handles the heckles at home, as his orchestra prepares to play the Proms

International Piano

Yamaha announces best-ever piano upgrade bonus

Yamaha has announced details of its annual piano upgrade promotion, which offers the company’s best ever part-exchange deals.

Apollo

Mass resignation of the Presidential Committee on the Arts and Humanities

In a letter sent on Friday, all the remaining members of the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities resigned in protest at President Donald Trump’s refusal to condemn far-right protests in Charlottesville.

Classical Music Magazine

Outrage as St Sepulchre’s stops taking bookings from musicians

The church, where Sir Henry Wood is buried, is regularly used by ensembles such as the London Youth Choir and City Chorus, but will close its hiring programme from 2018.

Classic FM

What tune does Big Ben chime? And everything else you wanted to know about the country’s most famous bell

Before it’s silenced for four years because of restoration work, we’re delving into the history of the most famous clock tower – and bell – in the world

Limelight

Massenet, The Nose and Meistersinger headline OA’s 2018

Stars on offer include Nicole Car, Jessica Pratt, Leo Nucci, Ferruccio Furlanetto, John Tomlinson and Michael Fabiano.

Broadway World

Following Casting Controversy; Albee Estate Proves Diversity Is Allowed

As BroadwayWorld reported in May, controversy recently erupted over an Oregon production of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Shoebox Theatre director Michael Streeter posted the below statement after receiving news from the Edward Albee estate.

Klassik Heute

Das Bebersee Festival eröffnet mit einem Familienkonzert

Das 15. Bebersee Festival eroöffnet in Kürze mit Beethoven und Goldberg-Variationen.

Musik Heute

Nach Maduro-Kritik: Venezuela streicht Tour von Stardirigent Dudamel

Caracas – Nach seiner Kritik an Staatschef Nicolás Maduro hat Venezuelas Regierung eine für September geplante Tour des Stardirigenten Gustavo Dudamel mit dem nationalen Jugendorchester gestrichen.

Codex Flores

Tinnitus beendet Berufsmusikerkarriere

In ungewöhnlicher Offenheit kommuniziert das Ensemble Tritonus über das Karrierende seines Mitglieds Andreas Ambühl – wegen eines unerträglich gewordenen Tinnitus.

Twitter

in 1878 Birth of Canadian Edward

Classical Music Magazine: Photo credit: Making Music

(Written on August 22, 2017 )

Farinelli is perhaps the most well known castrato singer and the new West- End production of Farinelli and the King brings his story back to life for the stage.

Between the 17th and early 20th centuries, many castrati became famous. Indeed, they were the darlings of the opera house; they played prestigious male and female lead roles, and classical composers wrote music specifically for castrati voices.

It is believed the practice was started around 1500, and the number of castrati declined during the 19th century.

Women were banned from the Vatican choir and much church music was written for high voices, therefore castrati were often employed. The unique voice of a castrato combined the pure sound of a boy soprano with the lung capacity of an adult male.

Castrati occupied a middle-ground between male and female, biologically they were male but psychologically and socially they weren’t considered to be men. They were forbidden from marrying, becoming priests or holding political posts.

Alessandro Moreschi was the Church’s last castrato singer, he died in 1922.

Here Alessandro Moreschi sings “Preghiera” by Francesco Paolo Tosti, recorded in the Sistine Chapel in 1902.

(Written on October 19, 2015 )

WildKat PR is delighted to announce that it is working with Solsberg Festival. The Argentinian cellist Sol Gabetta fulfilled her dream of curating her own classical music festival in the stunning surroundings of Northwestern Switzerland.

Sol Gabetta regularly performs with leading orchestras and conductors worldwide. Her debut with the Wiener Philharmoniker in 2004 helped her establish an international reputation as an extraordinarily talented cellist. She has won many prizes and awards including the Gramophone Young Artist of the Year Award, the Credit Suisse Young Artist Award and the ECHO Klassik Award.

Sol Gabetta has been a resident of the Frick valley, Canton of Aargau, for several years now. She is a devoted chamber musician and with the Solsberg Festival she brings her musical passion to her home. Sol Gabetta founded the Festival in 2006 and has since invited many of her fellow musicians to perform with her in the beautiful baroque churches of Olsberg and Rheinfelden. In June 2014 the festival welcomes renowned musicians such as Baiba Skride, Nicholas Angelich, Silvia Simionescu, Kristian Bezuidenhout, Cappella Gabetta and the Cuarteto Casals – artists, which stand at the forefront of a new generation of international soloists. Year on year, Sol Gabetta devises programmes, which excite her and her guests performers alike and visitors from all over Europe relish the festival’s warm and friendly ambience. With its unique programming and fantastic artist list, Solsberg Festival is an extraordinary addition to the musical landscape of the Basel region.

For more information about the festival, its venues and the region Aargau, please visit the festival website.

Stift Olsberg, photographed by Thomas Entzeroth

 

(Written on May 26, 2014 )

Following the release of a second album, a disc of American works, acclaimed flautist and recent Classical Music Magazine cover star Katherine Bryan performed a lunchtime recital at St Giles in the Fields today at 1:10pm at the enchanting St-Giles-in-the-Fields church.

She performed a selection of works taken from both her second album and her debut disc, “Katherine Bryan plays Liebermann and Nielsen”, including Hue’s Fantasie, Schumann’s 2nd Romance, and Paganini’s Caprice no 24 as well as Messiaen’s Le Merle Noir, and the staples of flute repertoire: Debussy’s Syrinx and Poulenc’s Sonata.

Of the prospect of performing such a diverse programme, Katherine said, “I am thrilled to have brought both well and lesser known works together in this concert. I feel the programme shows the flute in so many different lights, with pieces demanding drama, beauty and virtuosity.”

Katherine Bryan’s performing career was quickly established studying at the Chetham’s School of Music, Manchester and took flight when she won a full scholarship to study flute at the Juilliard School of Music, New York. She has been a prize – winner at the Young Concert Artists International Competition in New York and was a finalist in the BBC Young Musician of the Year for three consecutive competitions. She was awarded the Julius Isserlis Scholarship by the Royal Philharmonic Society.

Notably, she made her concerto debut at the tender age of 15 with Daniel Harding and the Orchestra of the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London and her American concerto debut with the Juilliard Orchestra at the Lincoln Centre, New York. Katherine has been in high demand as a concerto soloist since, performing with Helsinki Philharmonic, Hallé, Nurnberger Symphoniker, New York Philharmonic and English Baroque orchestras, as well as the Royal Scottish National Orchestra with whom she is still in residence as Principal Flute. In addition, she is also a lecturer in flute at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland and has played as Guest Principal Flute with the Philharmonia, London Philharmonic, BBC Scottish, Scottish Chamber, Royal Philharmonic, Swedish Radio, Northern Sinfonia, Hallé, and London Symphony Orchestras.

She has enjoyed success with her debut disc ‘Katherine Bryan plays Liebermann Flute Concerto’, which was released to great acclaim in 2010 and has been followed by a second disc including concertos by Rouse and Ibert in 2013, which achieved a high position in the UK Classical Charts, and was a Gramophone Choice disc in August 2013.

This performance at St Giles in the Fields celebrated Katherine’s recent successes and showcased her diversity, virtuosity and unique ability to bring the flute to life – especially in her encore, Gershwin’s It Ain’t Necessarily So.

CM 10 October 2013 - lowphoto 1 photo 3photo 2

 

 

(Written on October 15, 2013 )