Posts Tagged ‘drama’
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In today’s news, have you ever wondered why people don’t clap between movements in a symphony? Classic FM investigates. Lang Lang relies on his assistant to lend a hand mid-performance, and a Welsh opera company is under fire for its racist casting. Orchestra carries on without a conductor, and Delnon and Nagano extend their contracts in Hamburg.

The Guardian

Assistant lends a hand to Lang Lang

Pianist plays Gershwin at the New York concert hall with a 14-year-old protege literally his left-hand man.

Classic FM

Why don’t we clap between movements?

There’s a bit of a tradition in classical music that you only clap after a piece has finished – and never in between movements. But why does this ‘rule’ actually exist?

The Stage

Welsh opera under fire for racist casting

Industry figures, including the artistic director of Yellow Earth Theatre Kumiko Mendl and actor Daniel York, have slammed “yellowface” casting in the touring production.

The Sun

Writer of hit BBC drama ‘Doctor Foster’ has plans to make it into an opera

Playwright Mike Bartlett has written 17 works for the stage, including hits in the West End and on Broadway.

Codex Flores

Delnon und Nagano verlängern ihre Hamburger Verträge

Der Aufsichtsrat der Hamburgischen Staatsoper hat die Verträge mit dem Schweizer Georges Delnon und Kent Nagano an der Hamburgischen Staatsoper um fünf Jahre zu verlängert.

Broadway World

Shortlist Announced For The 2017 BroadwayWorld UK Awards; Voting Now Open!

Today, the shortlist is announced for the 2017 BroadwayWorld UK Awards, celebrating the best long-running West End productions and best new productions from around the country.


Klang der Revolution – Orchester spielen ohne Dirigent

So klang die Oktoberrevolution: Im Jubiläumsjahr der russischen Revolution von 1917 ist in Düsseldorf das Experiment des «herrschaftsfreien Musizierens» neu zu erleben.


@TrinityLaban  is today! Find out why ballet is good for everyone!

@BBCIntroducing Think Introducing only supports indie music? Think again. 

© Zack Seckler/Getty


(Written on October 5, 2017 )

 At a concert at the Sendesaal in Bremen, Anna Reszniak catches falling pages of music during a performance by violinist Christian Tetzlaff and pianist Lars Vogt.

(Written on October 13, 2015 )

On Wednesday evening, the WildKat London team were pleased to attend The Culture Debate in the Linbury Studio Theatre at the Royal Opera House. The debate, organised by the Creative Industries Federation and live streamed by BBC Arts, allowed members from arts industries to question representatives from the UK’s major political parties on their policies. Culture Minister Ed Vaizey and Deputy Labour Leader Harriet Harman were joined by the Martin Dobson, Baroness Bonham-Carter and Peter Whittle, and the debate was chaired by Martha Kearney.


After hearing from the speakers, social media feeds were overwhelmed with comments about the amount of consensus occurring. All spokespeople professed their support for the arts, but without any real attention towards how key issues can be addressed. In an audience full with teachers, CEOs of PR and advertising agencies and young people new to the sector, many participants gladly shared their own experiences with the panel: mainly highlighting the lack of support they felt they had received from the government.


Although we heard about the £7.7 billion that the arts contribute to the economy each year, and the fact that funding in Germany and Sweden has increased every year for the last 7 years in comparison, questions at the beginning of the debate “why say – we love you; here’s less?” were continually avoided. Many of the stories from individuals, including teachers, who had struggled and left their jobs because they felt there was no room for creativity, were dismissed as “anecdotal” by Ed Vaizey. Helpfully, Harriet Harman was able to provide some more evidence of the decline in arts subjects within schools, and followers took to social media to provide some more interesting statistics. The ISM, for instance, cited that in 2007 61,000 pupils studied music for GCSE, whilst in 2014 this had dropped to 47,000 pupils. Baroness Bonham-Carter’s reference to an “inspirational drama teacher” at Eton also irritated the audience, seeming, as Caroline Crampton from the New Statesmen wrote: “to skate over the other benefits private education brings.”

SATS and ArtsEducation remained a great focus of the debate. Ed Vaizey claimed that he does see art as being at the forefront of much primary education, whilst Harriet Harman continued to address the issue that equal opportunities are not provided to children in schools. This was mentioned as an issue within and outside of London, and one that was not addressed with any clear strategy. UKIP’s answer to this was to increase the amount of grammar schools, however as Caroline Crampton tweeted “It is not clear what this does for the arts”. When the conversation moved on to unpaid internships and the cost of living in London, everyone was yet again stuck for any form of solution, most notably Baroness Bonham-Carter, who could only agree with the statement.




The question of how far we should rely on schools to promote culture was also raised. As Londoners benefit from £69 of arts funding per head, compared with £4.50 in the rest of the country, how can we expect every school to perform equally in the arts? Points about creativity were also raised by the audience more generally. Creativity needs to be applied to our working lives, not merely encouraged vaguely in infant years, and then forgotten about.


This Culture Debate left many questions unanswered. Whilst it is difficult to quantify the monetary value of culture on a city or town and its inhabitants, the most pressing question for us was highlighted by Louise Jury, the Evening Standard’s Chief Arts Correspondent, after the debate: “if the arts generate so much revenue, why is it so impossible to invest in them?”

Let’s hope we will not be having an identical conversation in 4 years’ time.


(Written on April 10, 2015 )

Classic FM Online

Megadeth’s Dave Mustaine to be guest soloist with San Diego Symphony

The guitarist with heavy metal band Megadeth, Dave Mustaine, will take centre stage in a concert with the San Diego Symphony Orchestra

Eric Whitacre reveals sketches for Nine Inch Nails a capella cover

The choral composer uploaded initial sketches of his version of Trent Reznor’s ‘Hurt’ on YouTube yesterday, performed on piano

The Washington Post

Classical music: dead or alive?

Questioning the statement: “Classical music is dead”


Mozart museum seeks to debunk evil Salieri poison myth

It’s one of the great mysteries of music – did composer Antonio Salieri poison his onetime protege Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart with arsenic?

The Telegraph

Lorde fed up with ‘lecherous gaze’ of music industry

Grammy-winning teenage pop star Lorde says that ‘the price tag of fame sucks’ and bemoans the ‘lecherous gaze’ of music industry

PR Week

Scarlett Johansson and Oxfam fall out over controversial SodaStream work

Global charity Oxfam has accepted the resignation of Hollywood actress Scarlett Johansson after a spat over her commercial work for SodaStream, which has a controversial factory in an Israeli settlement in the West Bank

Der Tagesspiegel

Peer Gynt als Oper

Werner Egks Opernversion von Henrik Ibsens Drama “Peer Gynt” war bis in die sechziger Jahre ein viel gespieltes Stück. Dann geriet der Komponist in Verruf – wegen der Rolle, die er im “Dritten Reich” gespielt hatte. Das Staatstheater Cottbus stellt die Oper nun erneut zur Diskussion.


Classic FM Online

Classic FM Online

(Written on January 31, 2014 )