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Everyone listens to music. We can surely all agree that music is a big part of our lives, whether that be listening to the radio or a Spotify playlist on the way to work, letting our hair down in a nightclub on a Friday night, or watching a visiting orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall, music is something that everyone can relate to. So why are researchers warning of the extinction of music in secondary schools in England?

The government introduced the English Baccalaureate (EBacc) in 2010, with a goal to increase the take-up of ‘core’ academic subjects like mathematics and science. This move, however, has left the arts lagging behind. The Ebacc does leave space for students to take arts subjects and there is no solid evidence that the new syllabus has affected GCSE arts subject entries. However, in the New Schools Network report on the EBacc and the arts, it has been found that ‘schools have misunderstood the intention behind the EBacc, using its introduction to reduce funding for the teaching of the arts.’ This has therefore led to a decline in the number of qualified arts teachers, correlating with declining figures on music teacher PGCE courses.

The music industry contributes £3.5 billion to the economy, and it is well known that arts education improves job prospects by making young people more creative, tolerant and broad-minded. It is therefore strange that it is not taken as seriously as one of the ‘core subjects’ that the government view as most important to a child’s education. Catherine McKinnell stated in debates on arts subject inclusion and petition in February 2016: ‘I feel that the Government’s policy and approach at the moment fundamentally risks undermining the benefits that can come from that experience… at the most fundamental level, we need these skills for our economy. If we put off children and young people who can flourish in those areas even though they may struggle in some other ones, the evidence shows that that would be a worrying trend.’

Photograph: Newsteam

Not only does music enrich the economy, but it is also good for you. A study from the University of London’s Institute of Education ‘found that exposing children to classical music can aid in developing better concentration levels, self-discipline and social skills.’ Music is both valuable for the economy and for the individual and in Finland, teaching music and learning to play an instrument is the norm. It is, as stated by Stephen Moss in his article, Why not put music at the heart of education?, ‘the foundation of  children’s schooling (in Finland); it should be the model for us to follow.’

So what are we waiting for?

(Written on August 17, 2017 )

 

In today’s news: The number of people watching live music has risen in the past year, OAE announces first Rising Stars cohort, and John Axelrod’s big plans for the Bernstein Centennial. Spotify denies it is playlisting fake artists, and at G-20 Beethoven sends a mixed message to Trump.

The Times

Festival, gig and concert crowds soar

The number of people watching live music has risen in the past year, according to research which found that audiences at concerts and festivals were up 12 per cent and brought in £4 billion to the economy.

Classical Music Magazine

OAE announces first Rising Stars cohort

Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (OAE) has announced its first Rising Stars of the Enlightenment cohort: a group of up-and-coming singers the ensemble believes to be ‘the opera and vocal stars of the future’.

Pizzicato

John Axelrod’s big plans for the Bernstein Centennial

John Axelrod will turn Sevilla into the epicentre of European activities for the Bernstein at 100 worldwide events, the conductor told Pizzicato.

Music Business Worldwide

Spotify denies it’s playlisting fake artists. So why are all these fake artists on its playlists?

Last summer, MBW ran a widely-read story which blew the lid off the fact that Spotify’s platform was being deliberately clogged up with music by ‘fake’ artists.

neue musikzeitung

Kein Ausweis für den Hund – Barrie Kosky über seinen Bayreuther „Meistersinger“ im Gespräch mit Joachim Lange

Barrie Kosky bereitet auf dem Grünen Hügel in Bayreuth die „Meistersinger“ vor. Am 25. Juli werden damit die Richard-Wagner-Festspiele eröffnet.

concerti

„Die Musik geht einfach direkt ins Herz“

Die russische Sopranistin Julia Lezhneva über ihre Karriereanfänge, Gesangswettbewerbe und die Musik von Karl Heinrich Graue.

musik heute

Plácido Domingo hofft auf 4.000. Auftritt

Der spanische Opernsänger Plácido Domingo hofft, in seiner Karriere die Zahl von 4.000 Auftritten voll machen zu können.

El País

Max Richter, el músico que se propone dormirnos

El estreno español de ‘Sleep’, una nana de ocho horas para escuchar por la noche, genera una enorme expectación en Madrid.

The New York Times

At G-20, Beethoven Sends a Mixed Message to Trump

Littered streets were lined by police officers outside the Elbphilharmonie concert hall here on Friday evening after a concert put on for world leaders attending the Group of 20 summit meeting. Inside the security bubble: Beethoven.

Twitter

in 1890 Birth of Canadian Rodolphe

Classical Music Magazine: Rising Stars of the Enlightenment cohort

(Written on July 10, 2017 )

Classical News

In today’s news, Music makes £4.1 billion for UK economy, Martha Argerich becomes the 101st recipient of the Royal Philharmonic Society Gold Medal, and BBC Proms Australia 2016 is announced. Also, Wigglesworth declares that the ‘ENO must stay at the Coliseum’

Classical Music Magazine

Inaugural BBC Proms Australia announced

The BBC Proms will be exported outside the UK for the first time in 2016

The Telegraph

Mark Wigglesworth: ‘ENO must stay at the Coliseum’

Mark Wigglesworth’s five-year term as Music Director of English National Opera got off to a splendid start in September with a new production of Shostakovich’s Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk

The Guardian

Wynton Marsalis: trumpeting controversial ideas of classicism

The talented jazz trumpeter-composer champions what many see as a regressive kind of conservatism. His new violin concerto is premiered tonight by Nicola Benedetti at the Barbican; are his forays into classical music further betraying the jazz cause?

BBC Music Magazine

Music makes £4.1 billion for UK economy

A new report from UK Music reveals the growing strength of the music industry

Gramophone

Martha Argerich awarded Royal Philharmonic Society Gold Medal

Argerich becomes the 101st recipient of the award

BBC Music Magazine

Barenboim on Beethoven

Daniel Barenboim on his relationship with Beethoven’s music

Die Welt

Soll ein Künstler eine politische Meinung haben?

Gustavo Dudamel möchte sich nicht politisch äußern, dirigiert aber auf staatlichen Veranstaltungen in Venezuela, die ein korruptes Regime stützen. Jetzt dirigiert er Mozarts “Figaro” in Berlin

Pizzicato 

‘Musikzentrum’ in Bochum im Zeitplan

Das ‘Musikzentrum’ am Marienplatz in Bochum ist am Werden. Um die Marienkirche, gebaut Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts, entsteht ein Neubau mit kleinem und großem Konzertsaal, die neue Heimat der Bochumer Symphoniker

audiophil

BYP

Das Baltic Sea Youth Philharmonic (BYP) öffnet seine Pforten für die nächste Generation junger Musikstudenten: Rund 500 junge Musiker aus der gesamten Ostseeregion haben sich für die Ausbildungsprogramme und Touren des multinationalen Orchesters im Jahr 2016 beworben

El Pais

Adolphe Sax, padre del saxofón

Creador y obra protagonizan el último doodle, por el aniversario del nacimiento del creador y inventor, Adolphe Sax

El Mundo

La JORCAM acerca la música a todos los públicos con un ciclo de 29 conciertos

Los Teatro de Canal y la Joven Orquesta y Coro de la Comunidad de Madrid (JORCAM) han presentado la nueva temporada de Ciclo Ibercaja de música

Twitter

PRS FoundationOur Director blogs on the & the changing dynamics of the industry

AURORA:I sung Half The World Away for the Xmas ad this year!!! 

BBC Music Magazine : Remember remember the 5th of November. Here are 6 of the best pieces inspired by fire…

nov6th

Music makes £4.1 billion for UK economy/BBC Music Magazine

(Written on November 6, 2015 )

Classical News

In today’s news, Rhodri Marsden investigates the story behind Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture cannon whilst the Telegraph argues that, apart from the disco night, the BBC Proms are rather tame this year: exactly what it needs. Sinfini also gives a run down of what the parties are promising for the arts in the General Election. Elsewhere, 2Cellos have had to cancel their tour to the US due to Stjepan Hauser’s neck injury. Also in The StradViolinist Roland Glassl is leaving the Mandelring Quartet after 16 years. Andreas Willwhol, the former principal of the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra will succeed him.

The Independent

Rhodri Marsden’s Interesting Objects: The 1812 Overture cannon

Tchaikovsky’s lack of enthusiasm for his commission prompted the bloody-minded inclusion of a huge brass band, a carillon and, of course, the cannon

The Telegraph

A run-of-the mill Proms is just what we need

Notwithstanding its disco night, there’s nothing to frighten the horses in this season’s programme

The Strad

2Cellos cancel US tour due to injury

Stjepan Hauser of the cello duo has damaged his neck, according to a statement

Violist Roland Glassl to depart Mandelring Quartet after 16 years

His replacement is Andreas Willwohl, former principal violist of the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra

Sinfini

Election 2015 A vote for the arts

The value of the UK arts sector increased ten per cent between 2012 and 2013, and the creative industries are now estimated to be worth nearly £77bn to the UK economy.

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung

Deutsche Sänger räumen in London ab

Zwei Deutsche sind bei den Opera Awards als beste Sänger ausgezeichnet worden. Weder Anja Harteros noch Christina Gerhaher konnten den Preis persönlich entgegennehmen.

Berliner Zeitung

Wird Andris Nelsons Simon Rattles Nachfolger?

Andris Nelsons ist einer der aussichtsreichsten Kandidaten für die Nachfolge von Simon Rattle.

klassik.com

Auszeichnung im Rahmen des Kulturfestivals Euriade

Martin-Buber-Plakette für Thomas Quasthoff

El País

El pequeño  arte de pedir dinero

El triunfo del ‘crowdfunding’ demuestra la fascinación de nuestra cultura por lo mínimo al tiempo que revela cambios profundos en los modelos de negocio tradicionales

The New York Times

Peter Eotvos prepares the opera ‘Senze Sangue‘

Peter Eotvos, the man on the aisle, composed ‚Senza Sangue‘, which will receive its concert premiere on May 1 in Cologne, Germany.

Twitter

The Federation ‏@Creative_Fed: Schools should not be ofsted outstanding without arts + creative engagement says @HarrietHarman #chArter – about diversity and equal access

Culture Republic ‏@culture_public : Over £500k of #economicimpact for Scotland generated every day by #Edinburgh cultural venues http://bit.ly/1Ie4h9I 

The Royal Opera ‏@TheRoyalOpera : A busy week ahead @RoyalOperaHouse – kicking things off with #ROHroger on stage in rehearsal – it opens on Friday! ^C

2CELLOS-electric-cellossuits-1280 News 27th April 2Cellos. Photo: kyso.org

 

(Written on April 27, 2015 )