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The findings of the Panic! survey published by Create this week painted a bleak picture as they confirmed what has already been suspected – that the arts are dominated by the middle class, as people from working class backgrounds aren’t given the same opportunities to work in cultural industries.

Create London

Create London

The survey revealed some shocking statistics: on average men working in cultural industries earn 32% more than women working in the sector and nearly 90% of respondents have worked for free at some point in their career. This suggests that it is essential to have parents who are able to lend financial support, just to get a foot in the door of the arts industry.

So how can the arts sector broaden the diversity of its workforce? Schools could play a pivotal role in encouraging and educating children in culture. Many parents don’t have the time or inclination to do so themselves and arts organisations and classes outside of school are expensive.

Indeed, all children should have the right to an education in the arts. Not only can it bring happiness, but music, drama and art classes are also linked to emotional and social development, as well as academic achievement. Apart from this, if state educated children are never offered an education in the arts, they may never be able to consider employment in cultural industries. Surely diversity is essential for the arts to progress?

There are organisations which do a fantastic job promoting diversity and exposing less privileged people to culture. JazzUK, focuses on learning and participation, and aims to reach out to young people from diverse cultures and backgrounds, particularly those who are disadvantaged. Opera North sets a great example; it believes in giving all young people access to opera and always ensures children from poorer areas have priority. James Rhodes’ Instrument for every child initiative has put over 7000 instruments into the hands of Britain’s children. If schools can’t afford to offer such opportunities, such initiatives are vital.

Opera North, Children's Chorus/ Opera North

Opera North, Children’s Chorus/ Opera North

At a later stage in our education, universities play an important role in encouraging young people to explore the arts industry; internships in the cultural sector can be organised and funded by universities during summer holidays. All too often students are unaware of opportunities in the arts, as universities focus almost purely on promoting careers in non-arts sectors, such as law and accounting. 

A career in the arts should not just be for those who can afford it. Talent is everywhere so the opportunities to use it, should be everywhere too. Not only does everyone deserve to benefit from and experience the joy of working in the cultural sector, diversity in the workforce is essential to the future of originality in the arts. 

 

 

 

(Written on November 25, 2015 )

Are you a young graduate who is eager to network, meet new people, try something new and do business? Orpheus Sinfonia, themselves outstanding recent graduates, are hosting a networking event alongside their next concert Beneath The Score: The Love Triangle on 23rd March. There will be opportunities to meet other like-minded people before the concert, during the interval, and also afterwards over a drink or two.

There are many networking events out there but this one will be unique in its combination of business and culture. The concert’s theme focuses around classical music’s most famous love triangle between husband and wife Robert and Clara Schumann and their friend Johannes Brahms. Who will win over Clara in the end? Far from being your stereotypical concert, the music will be explained in a simple yet informative way, perfect for the classical music novice. Armed with this knowledge, you will be able to talk intelligently about culture when entertaining your clients back at the office. The concert is also a great excuse to take time out of your busy schedule to relax: being a young graduate can be tough if you are in a new city, job and routine.

So, come along, enjoy some great music, get noticed and make connections for yourself and your company.

Don’t forget your business cards!

Beneath The Score: The Love Triangle, St George’s Hanover Square, 19:30, 23rd March. Reserve your £5 tickets by emailing clara@wildkatpr.com

Orpheus Networking Blog

(Written on March 12, 2015 )

John Sandall

Data Scientist – YPlan

Chris Sheldrick

Founder – what3words

Jack Waley-Cohen

Co-founder – what3words

Last night’s Noted event hosted by WildKat PR and Sane & Able took a creative look at the world of apps and app building, with three professionals from the industry. These speakers included John Sandall – Data Scientist at YPlan – Chris Sheldrick – Founder of what3words – and Jake Waley-Cohen – Co-founder of what3words.

As with previous Noted events, last night the WildKat PR and Sane & Able offices were full to the brim with people from a variety of professions, students and enterprising individuals hoping to learn from the experience of the speakers and meet like-minded people. This event was particularly helpful for those who were interested in building an app, or those with questions about whether an app would be right for their business or idea. The speakers provided helpful and realistic advice and encouragement about what it is like to start, maintain and maintain success with an app as well as insider advice and tips.

When considering the preparations necessary to create a successful app, Jack Waley-Cohen of what3words emphasised the importance of planning: “If you seem to be running low on money (ie 6 months or less) then it will be much harder to get investment – make sure you plan.” Although financial backing is practically very important Chris Sheldrick added how people, team and ideas are also crucial: “If people get your idea quickly as well as being enthusiastic about it, they’re good to get on board with your team.” Given what the professionals from what3words said last night, not only is planning important but certainty of ideas and gaining support for the overall app is also imperative for success, including support found in people close to home: Chris mentioned that great additions to their team were found in people who were recommended or even friends of friends.

For fine tuning app ideas and businesses, YPlan’s John Sandall gave some great advice in stating the importance of focusing on quality not quantity. To really get an app going he said “Your idea HAS to be real and viable”. Jack Waley-Cohen added that getting an outside perspective from an industry professional is a good way to go about doing this: “To find out whether your app idea is good, then talk further with developer and see what they offer for their involvement!” Also, although YPlan is now a great success, John mentioned that YPlan was actually the 50th idea the founders had come up with. Taking time to fine tune the right idea that will get the consumer interested is worth the deliberation before you take your app dreams any further.

A great question raised was: ‘In what way can you get your app out to market and interest from the masses?’ what3words offered that they used a big PR push, however as Chris said: “we initially just put it out there without marketing to make sure we had feedback first”. It seems important not to waste time but instead to get your idea out there in order to get a feel for how the app will be received by the consumer. This is a good start for finding areas and ideas to improve. YPlan’s John Sandall suggested a launch event where people are invited along with speakers talking about the app to get a buzz. In the early stages of launching an app, a concern raised was app ideas being ‘stolen’ and then copied and used by another company, however the speakers were in agreement that it is good to share your ideas to gain feedback. Also, in order to protect an app Chris of what3words explained that you can apply for a patent: “think of it as a buffer for a deterrent – by the time you get approved or not, your idea will be big enough…”  The IdeaSafe was also highly recommended, an online vault that protects your creativity and prevents idea theft.

The evening was an insightful success due to the excellent honest speakers; the atmosphere was alive with creative minds in discussion.

Take at look at our next event ‘Successful Social Media’ on Wednesday 26th March. The April Noted event ‘How To Rebrand’ has also been announced on Eventbrite.

Check out Noted via Twitter or Facebook for more quotes from the speakers and information about the event.

Check back soon for a video blog from last night’s guests!

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Photos by Oliver Hyde-Tetley

(Written on February 27, 2014 )

The Guardian

Spotify to take on iTunes Radio with free tier for its music apps

11 December event expected to expand free mobile access from US, although on-demand streams will be limited

The New York Times

Kennedy Center Names New Chief

Deborah F. Rutter, who as president of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra helped it navigate the financial shoals that have sunk other orchestras, will become the president of the Kennedy Center next fall, the center announced on Tuesday

Voice of America

San Francisco Musicians Create ‘New’ Classical Music

A group of young artists in San Francisco are continuing that trend, giving new life to an old field: opera and European classical music

Star Tribune

Italian opera house La Scala: Riccardo Chailly to replace Barenboim as musical director

The Milanese opera house La Scala took another step in its artistic and managerial transition on Tuesday by confirming that Riccardo Chailly will be its new musical director, replacing Daniel Barenboim

Minnesota Orchestra: Board reports deficit of $1.1 million for fiscal 2013

Minnesota Orchestral Association reported revenue of roughly $12 million, nearly all through contributions and investment income

New Music Box

FAIR AND BALANCED

“Until we rid ourselves of the notion that the best music of all time was created by a handful of men who lived an ocean away from us and who all died more than a century before any of us were born, we will never have programming that truly reflects the vast array of musical creativity all around us.”

Digital Music News

A Tiny Percentage of Artist Income Comes from Copyright, Study Finds…

According to a study conducted by Peter DiCola of the Northwestern University School of Law, artists are now, on average, deriving a relatively tiny percentage of their income directly from copyrights

FONO FORUM

“Reden – das kann ich einfach so”

Die Pianistin Mitsuko Uchida ist nicht nur eine weltweit gefeierte Mozart-Interpretin, sondern weiß auch sachkundig und unterhaltsam über Musik zu erzählen. Im Januar gibt sie ein Gesprächskonzert zu Beethovens „Diabelli-Variationen“ in der Essener Philharmonie

FONO FORUM

FONO FORUM

(Written on December 12, 2013 )

The Telegraph

Classic show tunes provide boost for dementia patients

Care homes should be filled with the sound of music, researchers claim after discovering benefits of singing Broadway hits

Classic FM Online

Choirs compete to sing in The Shard

Amateur singers are competing for the chance to perform at the top of Western Europe’s tallest building

Andris Nelsons painting unveiled in Birmingham

The CBSO music director has been immortalised by artist Norman Perryman as part of the Symphony Hall collection

Limelight Magazine

The Concertgebouw: Are they the world’s best orchestra?

The Dutch orchestra frequently tops the rankings. Limelight Magazine finds out why

Global News

Kent Nagano to stay on at Montreal Symphony Orchestra until 2020

The Montreal Symphony Orchestra has extended the contract of music director Kent Nagano until 2020

The Guardian

Brands pump more than £100m into the UK music industry

Figures show brands were responsible for investing £104.8m in the UK music industry during 2012, an increase of 6% on 2011

Die Zeit

“Musik meint: Zurück zur Muttersprache!”

Schon als Kind grübelte Anne-Sophie Mutter über den Tod nach. Bis heute lindert Musik für sie jeden Schmerz

 

Classic FM Online

Classic FM Online

(Written on November 12, 2013 )

The Telegraph

Sakari Oramo: ‘Britain was my destiny’

Finland’s Sakari Oramo talks to Ivan Hewett about the challenges of becoming the BBCSO’s new chief conductor – and his uncanny sense of homecoming

Gramophone

Setting up a classical ensemble in the current climate is hard, but bowing to popular tastes is not the way

The London International Players are helping to bring classical music to new audiences

Arts Journal

Renée Fleming cancels UK for family emergency

Renée Fleming has cancelled a keenly-awaited orchestral concert in Oxford today. Her replacement will be Sylvia Schwarz

The Guardian

Just don’t call it ‘indie classical’

Nico Muhly, Olafur Arnalds and new generation of composers are successfully transposing classical tropes to a rock setting

ABQ Journal

New classical music organization debuts

Led by Artistic Director David Oberg, ‘Orchestra of Discovery’ in Albuquerque debuts Tuesday, Nov. 5 as small chamber ensemble

Incorporated Society of Musicians

HMRC agrees to reverse National Insurance rules

Good news for professional musicians as HMRC agrees to reverse National Insurance rules

Digital Music News

Head North: Ontario Sets Aside $45 Million to Fund Its Music Industry…

The province of Ontario has set aside $45 million CAD (~$43M USD) for a new Ontario Music Fund

Süddeutsche Zeitung

Zeitlos überwältigend

Es klingt wie ein wehmütiges, spätes Wiedersehen: Anne-Sophie Mutter hat nach fast 30 Jahren wieder ein Studioalbum mit den Berliner Philharmonikern aufgenommen. Auf “Dvořák” interpretiert die große deutsche Geigerin ein leidenschaftlich-romantisches Violinkonzert

The Telegraph

The Telegraph

 

(Written on November 4, 2013 )