Posts Tagged ‘Gender Equality’
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Today, March 8, marks International Women’s Day, a globally-recognised chance to celebrate and recognise the challenges and opportunities facing women across the world.

Along with our design partners Sane & Able, we have produced an infographic with stats and facts about the role women play in professional music, and how they are represented across the classical music industry. The theme of ‘space’ was chosen to highlight the light years we need to travel in order to achieve gender parity, as women are still vastly under-represented in the media for their achievements in composing and conducting.

We’ve highlighted that at the current rate, it won’t be until 2186 – 169 years away – that 50% of pieces composed and conducted by women will be the norm at the BBC Proms. Currently, only 4 of the 61 accredited ABO orchestras have women undertaking titled roles. This week we have compiled a Spotify playlist of 169 of our favourite pieces created or performed by women in celebration of the incredible contribution women make to the music industry, including those who have been overlooked by history.

The World Economic Forum’s ‘Global Gender Gap Report 2016‘ provides interesting – and sometimes difficult – reading for anyone interested in finding out the facts and statistics behind women’s role in areas such as education, economics, health and politics. From looking at the data collected it is clear that, like with classical music, we still have a long way to go to ensure that the female half of the population are given the same opportunities as their male equivalents.

It’s not all bad news. Serious efforts are being made to ensure fairer representation for women in the classical music industry. ‘Sound and Music‘ are aiming for a 50/50 split between male and female-identified composers as part of their vision for 2020, which is a short three years away. Later today, BBC Radio 3 are to broadcast a piano sonata by composer Fanny Mendelssohn, which up until recently had been falsely attributed to her brother Felix. Tomorrow, as part of HeForShe Arts Week, ‘Yes She Can’ are providing young women opportunities to network and discover more about careers in music, particularly in roles generally underrepresented by women such as tech and management.

Follow the hashtags #BeBoldForChange and #InternationalWomensDay on Twitter to find out more about how you can get involved in the campaign for gender equality.

 

(Written on March 8, 2017 )

In today’s news, a free online music app, Classical 100 increases its popularity in over 3,000 UK primary schools. Royal Albert Hall conducts study on gender association with various instruments, and Classical:Next announces the 2017 live performances at their conference. The Music Institute of Chicago appoints Venezuelan cellist Horacio Contreras to their Academy programme for gifted pre-college students, and today John Williams celebrates his 85th birthday. Yasuhisa Toyota’s unique concert hall designs engage audiences on a higher level.

Rhinegold

Royal Albert Hall survey reveals instrument gender bias

A study conducted by the Royal Albert Hall has revealed that brass instruments are associated with men, and string instruments with women. Of the 2,000 adults who took the survey, only 2% linked the trumpet with women and 3% thought that women were likely to play the French horn and the tuba.

Two thousand schools in England signed up for Classical 100

Over 3,000 schools and 5,000 teachers have now signed up for Classical 100 – a free online music app for UK primary schools created by ABRSM, Classic FM and Decca, and supported by the Department for Education.

The New Yorker

THE ARDOR OF JANE LITTLE, A WORLD-RECORD-SETTING ORCHESTRA MUSICIAN

Jane Little died like a warrior on the field of valor, clutching her bow so tightly that it had to be pried from her cold fingers. Her field was the stage of the Atlanta Symphony, in which she had played the bass from the age of sixteen until she keeled over in the middle of a performance, last year, at eighty-seven, having won a title that she had long coveted: the American musician with the longest tenure in any orchestra.

International Arts Manager

Classical:NEXT’s new adventure

Classical:NEXT has announced that its 2017 conference will include a new mini-festival. Titled ‘Seriously? – Adventures in Music’, it will see six showcase artists from Classical:NEXT’s programme perform for a public audience, along with groups such as Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra. The selected artists are collectif9 (Canada), Jerez Le Cam Quartet (Argentina/France/Belgium), Park Jiha (South Korea), Sven Helbig (Germany), Trip Trip Trip (Columbia) and Zwerm (Belgium).

The Strad

Venezuelan cellist Horacio Contreras joins Music Institute of Chicago faculty

The Music Institute of Chicago has appointed Venezuelan cellist Horacio Contreras to the faculty of its Community Music School and Academy programme for gifted pre-college students.

The Guardian

Study challenges view of arts subjects being pushed out of education

Arts subjects remain as popular as ever among pupils taking GCSEs in England, research has found, challenging the view that the government’s policies are forcing subjects such as drama and music out of classrooms in favour of subjects considered more academic.

Merkur

Klage gegen Konzertsaal-Wettbewerb

Kommentar: Kulturkrampf um Braunfels

Neue Musikzeitung

Dresden rechnet mit «sportlichem Finale» bei Umbau des Kulturpalastes

Dresden will den Umbau seines Kulturpalastes pünktlich abschließen, rechnet aber mit einem «sportlichen» Finale.

Deutschlandradio Kultur

Grand Prix of Nations in Berlin

Seit 1988 trägt Interkultur internationale Chorwettbewerbe aus. In der vergangenen Woche fand der Grand Prix of Nations erstmals in Berlin statt: Dreißig Chöre aus 15 Ländern präsentierten in der Philharmonie ihr Können und ihre jeweilige Gesangskultur.

The Washington Post

Concert halls call on this Japanese engineer to shape sound

Behind some of the world’s most reputed concert halls is a Japanese engineer whose finesse in shaping sound is so perfectly unobtrusive that all listeners hear is the music — in all its subtlety, texture and fullness.

Pizzicato

Moscow’s Subway Organizes Competition For Musicians

A professional jury has been set up to select musicians who will be allowed to play in the subway stations in Moscow.

Twitter

Music History  in 1908 FP of ‘s Symphony No. 2 in St. Petersburg. Composer conducting.

Classic FM  Happy 85th birthday to the great John Williams! Tune on now for an hour of his epic music!

Elbphilharmonie_Großer-Saal_c_Iwan_Baan-14

Image: Yasuhisa Toyota

 

(Written on February 8, 2017 )

In the run up to International Women’s Day this Sunday (8th March), WildKat PR are turning the spotlight onto influential and inspiring female figures in classical music, past and present.

Today’s focus is on Dame Ethel Smyth, a female composer of the late 19th and early 20th Centuries, who was also an extremely active suffragette. Such was her devotion to women’s rights that she gave up her music for two years to fight for the cause.

As common to many women of middle class origins at the time, music and music theory lessons were undertaken only as part of a ‘ladylike’ education and not a serious career option. Yet, for Ethel, these inspired her to relocate to the Leipzig Conservatoire when she was 19 where she studied composition, much to her Father’s disapproval who preferred for her to marry.

Ethel Smyth Picture

Bassano. Dame Ethel Mary Smyth Image: National Portrait Gallery, London

In Leipzig she studied under Carl Reinecke and Heinrich von Herzogenberg and it was around this time that her work was introduced to Brahms. He commented, with what she realised afterwards was not a compliment but actually ‘scathing irony,’ ‘So, this is the young lady who writes sonatas and doesn’t know counterpoint.

Despite Brahms’ comments, Smyth’s works were received with critical acclaim, particularly her String Quintet in E Major. Highly respected critic, Wilhelm Altmann, wrote ‘this quintet clearly showcases the composer’s tremendous talent.’ Her Symphonic Serenade in D, secured her recognition with both public and press.

Her introduction to Emmeline Pankhurst in 1910 sparked her passionate involvement in the Suffragette movement. Indeed, she was sentenced to two months in jail for breaking an anti-suffrage politician’s window with a brick! The movement also influenced her music: she wrote The March of the Women which became an anthem for suffrage and was sung by the women on marches.

So, what can we learn from Ethel today? Clearly, her uncompromising commitment to women’s rights is something which is still very important (although we do not condone her violent methods). Whilst there are many wonderfully talented female musicians, there is still a distinct lack of women composers and conductors and Ethel’s determination to buck the trend in 20th Century England is something our industry should celebrate and encourage.

Check back here tomorrow for the next in our series on Marin Alsop!

suffragettes_372

A Suffragette protest in London. Photograph: PA

Sources: WomenComposers.org

Spartacus Educational

The Telegraph

(Written on March 4, 2015 )