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Everyone listens to music. We can surely all agree that music is a big part of our lives, whether that be listening to the radio or a Spotify playlist on the way to work, letting our hair down in a nightclub on a Friday night, or watching a visiting orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall, music is something that everyone can relate to. So why are researchers warning of the extinction of music in secondary schools in England?

The government introduced the English Baccalaureate (EBacc) in 2010, with a goal to increase the take-up of ‘core’ academic subjects like mathematics and science. This move, however, has left the arts lagging behind. The Ebacc does leave space for students to take arts subjects and there is no solid evidence that the new syllabus has affected GCSE arts subject entries. However, in the New Schools Network report on the EBacc and the arts, it has been found that ‘schools have misunderstood the intention behind the EBacc, using its introduction to reduce funding for the teaching of the arts.’ This has therefore led to a decline in the number of qualified arts teachers, correlating with declining figures on music teacher PGCE courses.

The music industry contributes £3.5 billion to the economy, and it is well known that arts education improves job prospects by making young people more creative, tolerant and broad-minded. It is therefore strange that it is not taken as seriously as one of the ‘core subjects’ that the government view as most important to a child’s education. Catherine McKinnell stated in debates on arts subject inclusion and petition in February 2016: ‘I feel that the Government’s policy and approach at the moment fundamentally risks undermining the benefits that can come from that experience… at the most fundamental level, we need these skills for our economy. If we put off children and young people who can flourish in those areas even though they may struggle in some other ones, the evidence shows that that would be a worrying trend.’

Photograph: Newsteam

Not only does music enrich the economy, but it is also good for you. A study from the University of London’s Institute of Education ‘found that exposing children to classical music can aid in developing better concentration levels, self-discipline and social skills.’ Music is both valuable for the economy and for the individual and in Finland, teaching music and learning to play an instrument is the norm. It is, as stated by Stephen Moss in his article, Why not put music at the heart of education?, ‘the foundation of  children’s schooling (in Finland); it should be the model for us to follow.’

So what are we waiting for?

(Written on August 17, 2017 )

In today’s news: The government is stifling the creativity we desperately need, and Music Theatre Wales appoints consultant music director. Eight organs to be restored in Germany, Kimiko Ishizaka launches Kickstarter campaign and summer academy in Ettal launches festival programme.

Opera Now

Music Theatre Wales appoints consultant music director

Music Theatre Wales has appointed Richard Baker as its consultant music director, with immediate effect

Music Teacher

RWCMD announces autumn 2017 season

The Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama’s (RWCMD) autumn 2017 season will launch with Valery Gergiev conducting the Mariinsky Stradivarius Ensemble in the Dora Stoutzker Hall, and will conclude with Carlo Rizzi conducting musicians from the conservatoire and Welsh Opera in an opera gala.

The Times

The government is stifling the creativity we desperately need

The Ebacc removes arts subjects from the core school curriculum and its focus on a severely restricted, unimaginative programme means that the creativity of our children is being stifled at exactly the point Britain needs it most.

Pizzicato

5% more visitors at Verbier Festival

The Verbier Festival ended on 6 August after 17 days, 57 concerts and more than 200 events.

The Irish Times

The new director of New Music Dublin has his work cut out for him

The capital’s biggest new music bash, the New Music Dublin festival, has a new festival director in John Harris.

Mondoweiss
Israel’s siege on Palestinian music

If you love music as much as I do, your heart stopped when you read the Israeli Supreme Court’s decision to keep young musicians from leaving Gaza for the West Bank.

NMZ

Restaurierung von acht Orgeln: Land und Sparkassen geben 100.000 Euro

Der Freistaat und die Sparkassen-Kulturstiftung Hessen-Thüringen fördern die Restaurierung von acht Orgeln in diesem Jahr mit je 50 000 Euro.

Pizzicato

Kimiko Ishizaka: Kickstarter für Bach

Die deutsch-japanische Pianistin Kimiko Ishizaka hat eine neue Ergänzung zu der finalen B-A-C-H Tripelfuge komponiert.

concerti

In der Ruhe liegt der Klang

Zum vierzigsten Jubiläum veranstaltet die Internationale Sommerakademie in Ettal dieses Jahr ein Festival mit abwechslungsreichem Konzertprogramm.

Twitter

in 1891 Birth of Dutch violinist and Max .

Opera Now: Music Theatre Wales appoints consultant music director. Photo credit: Mike Kear

Merken

Merken

Merken

(Written on August 9, 2017 )

Classical News

In today’s classical news, UK government pulls its funding for London concert hall, Hungarian pianist and conductor Zoltán Kocsis dies, and ABRSM joins forces with Classic FM as ‘Partner in Music Education’. Also, the opening of the Elbphilharmonie Plaza attracts over tens of thousands of visitors in Hamburg and “Initiative kulturelle Integration” is launched.

The Guardian

Government pulls its funding for London concert hall

Plans to build a “world-class” concert hall in London have been thrown into disarray after the government pulled its funding on Friday. The project, which was proposed by the conductor Simon Rattle, was not affordable, the government said.

Zoltán Kocsis, pianist and ‘giant of music’, dies aged 64

Virtuoso Hungarian pianist and conductor Zoltán Kocsis, celebrated for his versatile technique, has died at the age of 64, his orchestra, the National Philharmonic, said.

Classic Fm

ABRSM joins forces with Classic FM as ‘Partner in Music Education’

ABRSM, the UK’s largest music education body, has teamed up with the nation’s most popular classical music station, Classic FM, to launch a new music education partnership.

Classical Music Magazine

Liverpool Phil announces second composition prize winner

Richard Miller has won the Liverpool Philharmonic’s second Christopher Brooks Composition Prize.He wins a cash prize of £1,000 and a year’s complimentary membership of the British Academy of Songwriters, Composers & Authors (Basca).

The New York Times

Jean-Jacques Perrey, Electronic Music Pioneer, Dies at 87

Jean-Jacques Perrey, the electronic music pioneer whose jubilant compositions turned up in settings as disparate as Disneyland and “The Simpsons,” died on Friday in Lausanne, Switzerland. He was 87.

Irish Examiner

This Kickstarter campaign wants to help an orchestra reinvent your favourite songs

Orchestras are no longer the reserve of Bach or Beethoven. They are increasingly becoming, dare we say it, cool. So what better time for the orchestra Metamorphestra? Founded in 2016 by Nick Proch, it brings an “oversized, high-energy, film score-esque approach to familiar songs”.

Musicweek

BRITs 2017 Voting Academy overhauled to promote diversity

The 2017 BRITs voting academy has undergone a major overhaul to promote greater gender and ethnic diversity among the awards’ voting body.

Musik-heute

Elbphilharmonie-Plaza lockt zehntausende Besucher

Die Plaza der Elbphilharmonie hat sich in den ersten Tagen ihrer Öffnung als Besuchermagnet erwiesen. Am Samstag haben nach der letzten Zählung rund 13.100 Menschen das Bauwerk besucht, am Sonntag kamen bis 17:00 Uhr 10.100 Besucher.

Klassik.com

Händel-Haus Halle erhält Porträt des Komponisten

Das Gemälde befindet sich im Besitz der Nachfahren von Händels Schwester und wird dem Händel-Haus als Dauerleihgabe zur Verfügung gestellt. Das großformatige Porträt zeigt den Komponisten in höherem Alter, der Maler ist unbekannt.

Musikrat.de

Initiative kulturelle Integration ins Leben gerufen

Anknüpfend an die Diskussionen von Bundeskanzlerin Merkel mit Vertreterinnen gesellschaftlicher Gruppen, Verbänden und Organisationen zum Thema Flüchtlinge, haben die Staatsministerin für Kultur und Medien Grütters, Bundesinnenminister de Mazière, Bundesarbeitsministerin Nahles und Staatsministerin Özoguz gemeinsam mit dem Deutschen Kulturrat die Initiative  ins Leben gerufen.

Twitter

klassik.com @klassikcom Britische Regierung legt Finanzierung für neuen Londoner auf Eis

rbb|24 @rbb24  Paul (1866-1946), Vater der , hätte heute 150. Geburtstag: Wir gedenken dem Komponisten mit seiner .

Music History @today_classical in 1926 Birth of Australian Dame Joan

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Photo Credit: Tristram Kenton for the Guardian.

(Written on November 7, 2016 )

In September at a concert in Turin, lead singer of U2, Bono called for “humanitarian leadership” in response to Europe’s refugee crisis. Whilst Europe’s leaders have been discussing solutions; musicians have also made a concerted effort to raise awareness of the plight of refugees and to give them some pleasure through music.

It was unfortunate that in the wake of the terrorist attacks in Paris this November, Spanish viol player and conductor Jordi Savall had to make the decision to postpone a concert. He was due to perform at the ‘Calais Together’ event with his ensemble Hespèrion XXI on 17th December at the refugee camp in Calais. His safety and the safety of his musicians couldn’t be guaranteed amid fears of unrest, however the event will take place by the Spring.

The Yehudi Menuhin School is also due to perform for refugees in Calais. On 20th January students and staff will work with volunteers at the ‘Jungle’ to distribute food parcels before performing a concert for around 6,000 refugees. The school hopes that it won’t just be a one off event and that they will return to Calais. The project is very much in line with Menuhin’s vision of the relationship the school should have with the outside world.

Yehudi Menuhin/ Yehudi Menuhin School "The violin, through the serene clarity of its song, helps to keep our bearings in the storm, as a light in the night, a compass in the tempest, it shows us a way to a haven of sincerity and respect."

Yehudi Menuhin/ Yehudi Menuhin School
“The violin, through the serene clarity of its song, helps to keep our bearings in the storm, as a light in the night, a compass in the tempest, it shows us a way to a haven of sincerity and respect.”

In October a demonstration and concert took place in Vienna to show solidarity with refugees in Europe, it featured the German punk band ‘Die Toten Hosen’, ‘Conchita Wurst’ and a speech by Austrian President Heinz Fischer. In London this November, Paloma Faith joined forces with Peace for a concert to raise money for Help Refugees; these are just two concerts among many throughout Europe. Rap singer M.I.A. released a track ‘Borders’, which charts the journey of refugees across Europe and criticises governments for not doing enough.

Perhaps the most extraordinary case of music raising awareness of the refugee crisis, is Syrian rock band Khebez Dawle, who made their journey from Lebanon to Germany fun by performing gigs along the way. Syria offered the group no hope of a career in music so they sold their instruments to pay smugglers to get them across the Mediterranean. Through their music, they aim to tell the stories of desperate migrants looking for refuge.

Khebez Dawle/ Yahoo

Khebez Dawle/ Yahoo

These musicians are aware of the power of their music and the hope and comfort it can offer to people with nothing else left. Some of these events have political undertones, whilst some aim to raise awareness of the plight of refugees on a purely humanitarian level. With the Yehudi Menuhin school’s concert in Calais in January and Jordi Savall’s soon to follow, the New Year could bring new hope. We often feel helpless in the face of such crises but whilst governments battle with big decisions, musicians are sharing their music and working according to Yehudi Menhin’s ethos of supporting minority communities.

(Written on December 22, 2015 )

The last minute cancellation of a performance last week by the Tehran Symphony Orchestra at the World Wrestling Cup, infuriated its conductor Ali Rahbari. As the orchestra was about to play the national anthem, it was announced that women weren’t allowed to perform; Rahbari refused to perform if the orchestra could not play all together.  

Since the Islamic revolution in 1979, women have been forbidden from performing solo on stage. Outside the capital, performances are often cancelled if there is a female musician, even when tickets have been sold. To perform music in Iran, it is necessary to have a permit from the ministry of culture, however even with the permit, anti -music groups call off concerts; conservatives and some religious leaders claim music can “excite and cause deviation” among the country’s youth. Last week’s incident was the first time a performance by the Symphony Orchestra had been cancelled because of its female members.

Only this April, after a three year interlude, was the orchestra revived by Alexander Rahbari. According to Rahbari, this is thanks to Rouhani’s relatively moderate administration. Under the previous president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the orchestra was broken up, due to negligence and financial stringency.

Tehran Symphony Orchestra performs in Tehran in March after a 25 month break/ photo: Payvand Iran news

Tehran Symphony Orchestra performs in Tehran in March after a 25 month break/ photo: Payvand Iran news

It is odd that there are such gender issues in Iran’s entertainment industry. In many ways, the country is one of the more progressive middle Eastern countries; 70% of university graduates in Iran are women. The cancellation of concerts which have been permitted by the ministry of culture is considered wrong, and there doesn’t seem to be much clarity or consistency on the issue; Iranian law allows women to perform as part of an ensemble, however sometimes concerts go ahead and on some occasions they are called-off. Women aren’t allowed to sing solo either, as a result many are forced to go abroad in order to pursue careers in music. Are the restrictions on women performing just an extreme method of limiting music in Iran rather than restricting women? It seems that women in other industries aren’t discriminated against as severely, but according to some conservatives, music can “excite and cause deviation.”

The restrictions on the performance of music, the necessity of a permit and the cancellation of concerts because of female performers seem bizarre to Europe. Although females in the European music industry – most notably composers and conductors – do face gender issues, we have progressed considerably. This week, it was announced that Xian Zhang will be guest conductor at BBC National Orchestra of Wales. Although female conductors are still a rarity, the idea of women in this role is becoming normalised.

Conductor Ali Rahbari

Conductor Ali Rahbari

The human rights of women in Iran have been infringed upon; the orchestra was quite right not to perform rather than bow to the demands of the authorities, who prohibited the women from playing. Not only is it a kind of gender segregation, but audiences are deprived of music, which they have paid to hear. The head of the Wrestling Federation, Rasoul Khadem, has asked the orchestra to play the national anthem at another wrestling event in Tehran in January; let’s hope it goes ahead uninterrupted! 

(Written on December 4, 2015 )

Classical News

In today’s news, St. John’s Smith Square joins REMA, a report finds that cities are recognising the benefits of culture and the Vienna Philharmonic is funding a home for asylum seekers. Also, Classical Music Magazine discusses concerns that the BBC’s funding will be cut again

Classical Music Magazine

St John’s Smith Square joins REMA

St John’s Smith Square is now a member of REMA (the European Early Music Network)

Arts Professional

Cities recognise benefits of culture, report finds

Local authorities envisage a shift away from direct provision of cultural services, but are preparing to lead by articulating a vision, brokering partnerships, and sourcing new funding

Classic FM

One of the world’s greatest orchestras is funding a home for asylum seekers

The Vienna Philharmonic is one of the world’s oldest orchestras, best known for its performances of great classical music. But now it’s announced a project to create a home for refugees in Austria

Classical Music Magazine

All who love music should campaign to save the BBC

The Conservative government is preparing its policy on the BBC’s future. The Green Paper published by government raises concerns that the BBC’s funding will be cut again, or that it will be significantly downsized. The effect that this might have on employment opportunities for musicians could be catastrophic

Süddeutsche Zeitung

Avantgardist der Klänge

Der Komponist Helmut Lachenmann wird 80 Jahre alt. Er hat verschiedene Geräusche in seine Arbeiten integriert. Seine Oper “Das Mädchen mit den Schwefelhölzern” gilt als eines der Hauptwerke unserer Zeit

Klassik.com

Drei Musikprojekte mit Junge Ohren Preis ausgezeichnet

Drei Musikproduktionen und -projekte sind am Donnerstagabend in der Villa Elisabeth in Berlin mit dem Junge Ohren Preis ausgezeichnet worden

NMZ

Hontvári Gábor gewinnt 7. Dirigierwettbewerb der Mitteldeutschen Musikhochschulen

Der Weimarer Musikstudent Gábor Hontvári hat den 7. Dirigierwettbewerb der Mitteldeutschen Musikhochschulen gewonnen. Damit habe bereits zum siebten Mal infolge ein Student der «Weimarer Dirigentenschmiede» den Wettbewerb der drei Hochschulen für sich entscheiden können

The New York Times

Andrew Norman on Loving ‘Star Wars’ and Pushing Musical Boundaries

When Andrew Norman was growing up, “Star Wars” was the only film his family owned on video. Fascinated by John Williams’s classic score, Mr. Norman decided when he was young that he wanted to be a composer

Scherzo

El Centro de Investigación y Documentación Musical de la UCLM se asocia al CSIC

La Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM) cuenta con la primera Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) en el ámbito de la Música y la Musicología

Twitter

Top Classical News:  ‏@topcmnews Soprano Hannigan shatters classical music’s glass ceiling – Malay Mail Online http://bit.ly/1IlKtOT  #ClassicalMusic

BBC Radio 3:@BBCRadio3  Music in Time: JS Bach never wrote an opera, but the St. Matthew Passion comes pretty close #EssentialClassics

Classical Orchestras:@OrchestrasToday  BBC Radio Christmas highlights 2015 http://bbc.in/1Q25wwq

Cities recognise benefits of culture

Cities recognise benefits of culture

(Written on November 27, 2015 )

Italy, the country where opera was born around 1600, is home to more than 800 opera houses, many of which have been neglected. A combination of bad management and budget cuts under the Berlusconi government meant that opera houses were severely underfunded, resulting in musicians’ salaries being cut. In some cases, musicians weren’t paid for months on end; many protested and went on strike. By 2013, spending on Italy’s cultural heritage had dropped from €165 million in 2008 to €75 million.

Protests against cuts in Italy's culture budget outside La Scala, Milan in December 2010

Protests against cuts in Italy’s culture budget outside La Scala, Milan in December 2010

Italian opera houses have always relied on state and regional grants, making them more dependent on the state than their counterparts in the UK, which benefit from more private investment. This is however not the case for La Scala in Milan, or Il Teatro Lirico in Turin, as in larger Italian cities, opera houses tend to receive more corporate sponsorship. Opera in smaller cities, such as Florence, has therefore been affected most severely by the cuts in government funding.

The 2013 Italian opera crisis was exasberated by the  financial crisis, and only Milan’s La Scala, Teatro Regio, Turin and La Fenice, Venice were able to pay their bills on time. As a result opera became even less mainstream in the country of it’s birth.

So, how has Italy attempted to solve this crisis? Opera houses are now putting on more modern productions and technology, and social media is being used to show behind the scenes production, via live blogs. La Scala leads the way with translation screens in seats for non Italian speakers, in an attempt to make the art form more accessible.

In May, La Scala premiered ‘CO2’, a contemporary opera which aims to make us acknowledge our responsibility for the planet. It nicely coincided with Expo- Milan 2015, the theme of which was ‘feeding the planet, energy for life’. The opera featured quick scene changes and videos. It was well reviewed.

On a smaller scale, a crowd-funding campaign called ‘adopt a theatre’ has been established by a group of  European singers, to raise money to help bring Italy’s opera houses back to life. So far, the campaign has has resulted in residents of Bevagna, Perugia donating 8,000 to relaunch the Francesco Torti opera theatre. The campaign is now being exported around the country.

The stunning Teatro Francesco Torti in Perugia, saved by the 'adopt a theatre' campaign is launching three new operas.

The stunning Teatro Francesco Torti in Perugia, saved by the ‘adopt a theatre’ campaign is launching three new operas.

Further measures being taken to increase revenues involve opera houses sharing their stages with cinemas and dancers. La Fenice in Venice is adapting its programme to suit the tastes of the huge numbers of tourists who visit the city.

With minimal government support, opera houses in Italy have taken steps to save themselves from collapse, management is being reorganised and as in the UK, modern audiences are being targeted. Opera in Italy may well flourish again, thanks to innovative ideas and initiatives being taken, however these are only first steps, and funding is still short. Perhaps the future of opera houses, particularly those in smaller cities, is not secure just yet.

 

(Written on November 4, 2015 )

 

Classical News

In today’s news, the arts world is being love-blitzed by government ministers, and The Arts Desks discusses music in other cultures. Also, the Sir Karl Jenkins Music Award 2016 is launched, and interviews with Andrea Bocelli and Andrew Shore

The Times

Richard Morrison: Finally the arts world is being love-blitzed by government ministers

David Cameron isn’t the only Tory rushing to seize the centre ground with a show of cuddly, caring conservatism. After years in which his party huffed and puffed about the importance of youngsters getting qualifications in “hard” academic disciplines, the arts world is suddenly being love-blitzed by his education ministers

Telegraph

Andrea Bocelli: ‘It’s beautiful to sing for everybody’

If Andrea Bocelli had his way, he would never speak, only sing. So it seems almost unfair to subject him to an interview

The Guardian

Baritone Andrew Shore: from baring all for Beckmesser, to toupees and timing

He’s always wanted to play a panto dame, eyebrows are crucial, and the best singers are those that simply listen to the music. The great buffo-baritone talks us through some of his greatest comic roles for English National Opera

The Arts Desk

Extract: The Other Classical Musics

Michael Church prefaces a collection of essays on the Great Tradition in different cultures

Classical Music Magazine

Royal College of Music development gets green light

The Royal College of Music (RCM) has been granted planning permission for the development of its site on Prince Consort Road

Classic FM

Sir Karl Jenkins Music Award 2016 launched

The Arts Club has announced details of this year’s Sir Karl Jenkins Music Award 2016

Der Tagesspiegel 

Der Nachwuchs kommt aus Fernost

Alle Finalisten spielten beim Max-Rostal-Wettbewerk an der Universität der Künste das gleiche Werk. Gewonnen hat nur einer: Diyang Mei aus China

Concerti

„Heute will sich das Publikum amüsieren“

Nikolai Lugansky gilt als Exponent der russischen Klavierschule, er selber will von solchen Klassifizierungen jedoch nichts wissen

Pizzicato 

Rare Mozart Letter Sold For $217,000 At Auction

A rare letter written by Mozart sold for $217,000 according to Boston-based RR Auction. The one-page signed note in German is undated, but was probably written in the summer of 1786 to the composer’s close friend, the great Austrian botanist Nikolaus Joseph von Jacquin

Pacific Standard

Music Is a Potent Source of Meaning

But new research finds younger and older people largely listen for different reasons. The source of music’s power has long been debated, with many psychologists concluding its primary benefit is emotional regulation. For many of us, that has always seemed awfully reductive and recently published research suggests we may be right

Le Figaro

Les Gipsy Kings au patrimoine mondial de l’Unesco?

La rumba catalane, musique emblématique de groupes gitans de Barcelone ou Perpignan comme celui de la famille Reyes, est candidate pour être inscrite sur la liste du patrimoine culturel immatériel des Nations unies

Twitter

Arts Council England ‏@ace_national : #culturematters: share our EDM with your MP, recognising economic impact of arts&culture http://bit.ly/1L1tSW3 

Sinfini Music @SinfiniMusic  : Mr @LudovicoEinaud‘s new album dropped today! We quizzed him about Euclid, Eminem & an extremely full iPhone… http://bit.ly/1LQr2ok 

Classic FM ‏@ClassicFM  :10 pieces of classical music that will change your life: http://classfm.co/tzsPBl  (and all of them are on @composed)

news16oct

The Kyrgyz ensemble Tengir Too/The Arts Desk

 

(Written on October 16, 2015 )

Classical News

In today’s news, Classic FM reports on Gramophone Awards highlights, and Sarah Connolly argues that the government neglects arts education and funding at its peril. Also, BBC Music Magazine writes Sir David Willcock’s obituary

Classic FM

Gramophone Awards 2015 – all the action from the ‘Oscars of classical music’

The stars of the classical world and a night of the best music – let us take you there…

The Guardian

‘The arts makes us well-rounded, questioning, lateral-thinking people’

Singer Sarah Connolly – the principal speaker at an Arts Council event at Westminster earlier this week – argues that the government neglects arts education and funding at its peril. We are facing a national disaster

BBC Music Magazine

Sir David Willcocks (1919-2015)

Lengendary King’s, Cambridge choirmaster dies aged 95

BBC

Mozart gets Johnny Rotten makeover

A new portrait of Mozart imagines the composer as a “daring” and “edgy” musician in the mould of Johnny Rotten

Sinfini

Barbican launch Sound Unbound

The Barbican Centre has announced the line-up for a two-day festival aimed at people who have never engaged with classical music before

Pizzicato

Nagano’s Les Troyens from Hamburg available on Arte

Arte concert offers worldwide streaming from Hamburg, in cooperation with Binnenalster Filmfest and City Management Hamburg

Classicalite

Call for Scores: Royal Northern Sinfonia, Lars Vogt Seek Chamber ‘Mozarts of Tomorow’

Having stirred the personnel pot earlier with the appointment of pianist Lars Vogt as music director, the Royal Northern Sinfonia–the United Kingdom’s only full-time chamber orchestra stationed there at Sage Gateshead–is now challenging young U.K. composers to stir up its repertoire

Süddeutsche Zeitung

Feiert die Kassette ein Comeback?

Hersteller von Musikkassetten freuen sich in den USA über einen neuen Boom. Der Grund dafür sei ein Trend bei jungen Hipstern. Gibt es den auch in Deutschland? Eine Spurensuche

Der Tagesspiegel

Aus der Schublade gefallen

Dem Solistenensemble Kaleidoskop wird trotz erfolgreicher Arbeit die Förderung gestrichen. Ein Krisengespräch vor der „Orfeo“-Premiere.

Epoch Times

Gergijew gibt umjubelten Einstand in München als Chef der Münchner Philharmoniker

Der russische Dirigent Waleri Gergijew hat am Donnerstagabend mit Gustav Mahlers „Auferstehungssymphonie“ sein Antrittskonzert als neuer Chef der Münchner Philharmoniker gegeben.

Twitter

GramophoneHere is our full report from last night’s wonderful .

Classic FMA stunning duet from & .

Sinfini Music : Pain for the ears, but perfect for near to the end of the day. Some unfortunate classical music fails.

News 18th

Cellist Matthew Barley, who will perform at the Barbican’s Sound Unbound Classical Weekender. Image © Madeleine Farley/ Sinfini Music

(Written on September 18, 2015 )

On Wednesday evening, the WildKat London team were pleased to attend The Culture Debate in the Linbury Studio Theatre at the Royal Opera House. The debate, organised by the Creative Industries Federation and live streamed by BBC Arts, allowed members from arts industries to question representatives from the UK’s major political parties on their policies. Culture Minister Ed Vaizey and Deputy Labour Leader Harriet Harman were joined by the Martin Dobson, Baroness Bonham-Carter and Peter Whittle, and the debate was chaired by Martha Kearney.

Investment

After hearing from the speakers, social media feeds were overwhelmed with comments about the amount of consensus occurring. All spokespeople professed their support for the arts, but without any real attention towards how key issues can be addressed. In an audience full with teachers, CEOs of PR and advertising agencies and young people new to the sector, many participants gladly shared their own experiences with the panel: mainly highlighting the lack of support they felt they had received from the government.

Untitled

Although we heard about the £7.7 billion that the arts contribute to the economy each year, and the fact that funding in Germany and Sweden has increased every year for the last 7 years in comparison, questions at the beginning of the debate “why say – we love you; here’s less?” were continually avoided. Many of the stories from individuals, including teachers, who had struggled and left their jobs because they felt there was no room for creativity, were dismissed as “anecdotal” by Ed Vaizey. Helpfully, Harriet Harman was able to provide some more evidence of the decline in arts subjects within schools, and followers took to social media to provide some more interesting statistics. The ISM, for instance, cited that in 2007 61,000 pupils studied music for GCSE, whilst in 2014 this had dropped to 47,000 pupils. Baroness Bonham-Carter’s reference to an “inspirational drama teacher” at Eton also irritated the audience, seeming, as Caroline Crampton from the New Statesmen wrote: “to skate over the other benefits private education brings.”

SATS and ArtsEducation remained a great focus of the debate. Ed Vaizey claimed that he does see art as being at the forefront of much primary education, whilst Harriet Harman continued to address the issue that equal opportunities are not provided to children in schools. This was mentioned as an issue within and outside of London, and one that was not addressed with any clear strategy. UKIP’s answer to this was to increase the amount of grammar schools, however as Caroline Crampton tweeted “It is not clear what this does for the arts”. When the conversation moved on to unpaid internships and the cost of living in London, everyone was yet again stuck for any form of solution, most notably Baroness Bonham-Carter, who could only agree with the statement.

Arts

Internships

 

The question of how far we should rely on schools to promote culture was also raised. As Londoners benefit from £69 of arts funding per head, compared with £4.50 in the rest of the country, how can we expect every school to perform equally in the arts? Points about creativity were also raised by the audience more generally. Creativity needs to be applied to our working lives, not merely encouraged vaguely in infant years, and then forgotten about.

Videogames

This Culture Debate left many questions unanswered. Whilst it is difficult to quantify the monetary value of culture on a city or town and its inhabitants, the most pressing question for us was highlighted by Louise Jury, the Evening Standard’s Chief Arts Correspondent, after the debate: “if the arts generate so much revenue, why is it so impossible to invest in them?”

Let’s hope we will not be having an identical conversation in 4 years’ time.

photo-8

(Written on April 10, 2015 )