Posts Tagged ‘Haydn’
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Tickets for harpsichordist Eddy Grossenstein’s UK concerts are now on sale!

Eddy’s European concerts have enjoyed considerable success, and now he is bringing his performing talents to the UK. From the end of March to the end of May he will undertake a series of concerts in England and Scotland.

On his decision to perform in the UK and the venues he will be playing in, Eddy commented:
“I have chosen the venues because they are beautiful and historic places with amazing acoustics. I have played prolifically on the continent and now I am choosing to come to the UK because the concert-going public here are one of the most enthusiastic in the world. In the UK, people go to concerts to listen to good music. And just for it.”

Eddy’s first concert will be on March 29th in the beautiful St Andrew’s Church, Cheltenham.

For a full list of dates and to buy tickets, please see Eddy’s website.

Eddy Gro, 1

 

(Written on March 3, 2014 )

It’s a long-long weekend, it’s the Jubilee Weekend – it’s a WildKat party!

The Jubilee Weekend is upon us, London is decked out in flags and all things festive and we feel compelled to share our favourite regal and patriotic music with you. That bunting would just look so out of place if it weren’t for some royal tunes to go with it.

So here are some of our favourite (some seriously superb, some simply fun) musical choices for the royal weekend! Wave those flags, get the beverages and the food out and let’s sing and sway along!

Handel – Music for the Royal Fireworks

Composer under contract of George II for the fireworks in London’s Green Park on 27 April 1749 Handel’s Music for the Royal Fireworks celebrated the end of the War of the Austrian Succession. When published, Handel wished to present the work as an overture but the Crown had it given the title “Music for the Royal Fireworks” as propaganda in favour of an otherwise unpopular Treaty and monarch.

Thomas Arne’s – Rule Britannia! 

Rule Britannia was  was originally composed for Alfred, a masque about Alfred the Great, and first performed at the country home of Frederick, Prince of Wales (the eldest son of George II and father of the future George III, as well as the great-grandfather of Queen Victoria), on 1 August 1740, to commemorate the accession of George II and the third birthday of the Princess Augusta.

We know several people who are huge fans of this diva-off:

 

Walton – Crown Imperial

Despite being composed for King George VI’s brother, Edward VIII, Crown Imperial was first performed at the coronation of King George VI in 1937.

Widor - Toccata from Symphony No 5

Probably one of Widor’s best known works, the Toccata from Symphony No. 5 for Organ has been performed at the weddings of many members of the Royal Family, including Princess Anne, Prince Edward and Prince William.

Haydn – “Kaiser” Quartet

To round off our playlist, we’re recommending Haydn’s String Quartet Op. 76 No. 3, which was composed while he was employed at the court of Prince Nicolaus Esterházy II and boasts the nickname ‘Emperor’ because Haydn quotes the melody from ‘God Save Emperor Francis’.

(Written on June 1, 2012 )

Jessica Duchen’s Classical Music Blog

Hooray For Haydn.

Haydn is named a member of the top ten most performed composers of 2011.

The Guardian

Delius: Beauty In The Ear Of The Beholder.

His life was as romantic and colourful as his exquisite music, yet his works are rarely performed today. Delius deserves better, writes Julian Lloyd Webber.

LA Times

Gustavo Dudamel’s Mahler Project.

The Los Angeles Philharmonic’s mammoth tribute to the composer is an unprecedented musical feat for the conductor.

New York Times

New York City Opera Declares Rehearsal Lockout.

Talks break down at City Opera.

The Independent

Twenty Years Of Brahms & Liszt: Meet The Classic FM DJs Who Have Made Fugues Funky.

For decades, classical music was considered fusty and exclusive. One broadcaster has changed all that.

Sergei Prokofiev: Beyond ‘Peter And The Wolf’ – The Rehabilitation Of Stalin’s Composer.

Prokofiev followed ‘the bitch goddess success’ back to Soviet Moscow – or so the story goes. Think again, Vladimir Jurowski tells Andrew Stewart.

The Times

Gabriel Prokofiev Takes On The Family Business.

Fancy a classical club night? The composer Sergei Prokofiev’s grandson’s is a dab hand at making worlds collide.

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/arts/music/classical/article3278958.ece

 

(Written on January 9, 2012 )

Following the huge success of the 2011 Music@Malling Festival, Thomas will conduct a one-off Christmas concert on 17th December 2011 conducting the highly-acclaimed ensemble, Chamber Domaine. Featuring music by Mozart and Sibelius in a candle-lit venue, this concert promises to be the perfect occasion to enjoy some festive music in an exquisite setting.

Programme:

Sibelius – Romance

Mozart – Divertimento in D K. 136

Sibelius – Rakastava

Interval 

Sibelius – Valse Triste

Mozart – Divertimento in B K137

Sibelius – Andante Festivo

Mozart – Divertimento in F K 138

Tickets are £15 for adults and free for children. For booking more information please call 01732 770 929.

Next year Music@Malling Festival will feature the work of Huw Watkins and Judith Bingham alongside MendelssohnMozart and Haydn.

(Written on December 7, 2011 )

Every day the WildKat team scan the newspapers and blogs online to bring you a digested list of the day’s classical music.

Gramophone Blogs

500 years of St. Johns College, Cambridge

Andrew Nethsingha looks to the future as The Choir of St John’s College, Cambridge marks the 500th anniversary of the College.

Gramophone News

Tears as Helsinki Philharmonic plays Sibelius’ Eighth fragments

Extraordinary scenes as composer’s own orchestra plays controversial sketches for the first time.

The Guardian -Tom Service

Leif Segerstam: weird and wonderful symphonic master

Maverick, eccentric? Words can’t describe this prolific Finnish composer – which probably explains his symphonies’ titles.

The Telegraph

ENO’s new Eugene Onegin is a great show: shame about the casting though.

Eugene Onegin is the perfect opera in search of the perfect production, which it rarely gets. I’ve seen some stinkers in my time – including the infamous Brokeback Mountain staging in Munich several years ago, which transformed Lensky and Onegin into cowboy lovers and the grand ball in St Petersburg into a nightclub dance routine done by all-male chorus line in big hats, boots, and little else.

The Times

Takács Quartet: Haydn String Quartets

Nothing in Haydn is innocuous. This isn’t music for multi-taskers: the more closely you listen, the more gripping and mischievous it becomes…

 

(Written on November 18, 2011 )

BBC Music Magazine

Too much emphasis on recordings?

Nick Shave asks what’s happened to the traditional concert experience

LA Times

Technology is infringing on classical music

Invite smartphones and iPads into the music hall? That overlooks the point that a concert is a chance to untie the digital umbilical cord and replace it with chords that resonate.

The Telegraph

Edinburgh 2011: Orlando Paladino, Usher Hall

This Haydn performance made up in style what it lacked in substance.

The Guardian

Classical Machynlleth festival: Haffner Wind Ensemble – review

That Janáček in old age could write music so life-affirming seems miraculous; the intensity with which the Haffner players invested their playing suggested they felt as much, writes Rian Evans

The Times

On-screen opera: when do I clap?

As performances are increasingly transmitted live to cinemas, a dilemma raises its head: is it OK to applaud?

(Written on August 31, 2011 )

Cosa? Hélène Grimaud

Dove? Conservatorio G. Verdi, Milano

Quando? Mercoledì 1° Dicembre Email per le prenotazioni!

Pianista e scrittrice francese, Hélène Grimaud dimostra sin dai primi anni di studio uno spiccato talento che, all’età di 13 anni, la porta al Conservatorio di Parigi e poi alla registrazione del primo disco, il Secondo Concerto di Sergei Rachmaninov con il quale si aggiudicherà il Grand Prix du Disque dell’Accademia Charles Cros. Comincia giovanissima la sua carriera da pianista professionista a Parigi nel 1987 per essere in seguito diretta dai più rinomati maestri d’orchestra.

Per la presentazione in Italia del suo nuovo CD, la Grimaud ha scelto il Conservatorio G. Verdi di Milano.

Cosa? George Gershwin- Porgy & Bess

Dove? Auditorium di Milano Fondazione Cariplo

Quando? 2-3-5 Dicembre

L’Orchestra Sinfonica di Milano, conosciuta anche come La Verdi, viene fondata nel 1993 e tra i suoi direttori vanta il nome di Riccardo Chailly, oggi Direttore Onorario. Nel corso di questi anni si è esibita presso le più rinomate città europee e in Sud America.

Questo dicembre, per tre date diretta da Wayne Marshall, eseguirà dal repertorio di Gershwin, Porgy & Bess, nella versione per due soprani, tenore, baritono e coro. Ad accompagnare i soprani Indira Mahajan, Angela Renée Simpson, il tenore Ronald Samm e il baritono Kevin Short, sarà il coro sinfonico di Milano Giuseppe Verdi.

Cosa? Quartetto Auryn

Dove? Sala dei Notari, Palazzo Priori ,Perugia

Quando? Venerdì 3 Dicembre ore 21,00 Domenica 5 Dicembre ore 17,30 Email per le prenotazioni!

Insieme da ben 29 anni, il quartetto Auryn può vantare la partecipazione ai più importanti centri di musica classica internazionale, restando probabilmente l’unico ad aver eseguito in concerto tutti i quartetti di Haydn. L’ensamble di Colonia ha inoltre eseguito prime mondiali di numerosi e noti compositori; tra le partecipazioni più rilevanti si ricordano quella a Salisburgo nell’estate 2003 e ai festival di Edimburgo e delle Fiandra nel 2004.

In quest’appuntamento perugino il quartetto continua il ciclo integrale dei quartetti di Beethoven inaugurato lo scorso Gennaio.

Cosa? Gala Rachmaninoff- Concerto per pianoforte e orchestra

Dove? Auditorium Parco della Musica, Roma

Quando? 4-6-7 Dicembre

La Sala Santa Cecilia dell’auditorium Parco della Musica fa da cornice a questo appuntamento che vede l’orchestra dell’accademia nazionale di Santa Cecilia, il direttore Diego Mathieuz e il pianista Yefim Bronfman eseguire dal repertorio di Rachmaninoff la Sinfonia n°1 e il concerto per pianoforte n°3.

L’appena 25enne Diego Mathieuz è senza dubbio uno dei più promettenti talenti provenienti dall’America (il suo paese d’origine è il Venezuela). Stabilitosi in Italia, ha debuttato a Bologna con la Mozart Orchestra di Claudio Abbado. Nel 2009 è cominciata la collaborazione con l’Orchestra dell’Accademia Nazionale di santa Cecilia e continuano performance in tutta la penisola.

Yefim Bronfman, pianista di origine russa, è conosciuto per il suo virtuosismo e si è esibito con le più importanti orchestre americane ed europee.

Cosa? Roberto Cominati

Dove? Associazione Scarlatti,Napoli

Quando? Giovedì 9 Dicembre ore 21,00 Email per le prenotazioni!

Roberto Cominati  è un nome da ricordare nell’elenco dei pianisti italiani contemporanei e, senza dubbio, un talento da ascoltare. Comincia prestissimo, all’età di 8 anni, presso il conservatorio di Napoli San Pietro a Majella per poi continuare in giro per l’Italia e vincendo concorsi internazionali. Si è esibito presso le principali società concertistiche italiane ed è stato diretto da celebri maestri d’orchestra.

Il pianista napoletano presenterà il 9 dicembre presso l’Associazione Scarlatti di Napoli il primo di due concerti dedicati all’esecuzione integrale delle musiche per pianoforte di Maurice Ravel.

Cosa? Orchestra Sinfonica Nazionale- Concerto n°8

Dove? Auditorium RAI, Torino

Quando? 9 e 10 Dicembre

L’Orchestra Sinfonica della RAI nasce nel 1931 a Torino e nel corso di tutti questi anni ha visto succedersi i più importanti direttori d’orchestra del momento. Suona anche in concerti sinfonici e da camera nelle principali città e nei festival più importanti d’Italia. Da ricordare le sue presenze abituali a Torino Settembre musica, alla Biennale di Venezia e alle Settimane Musicali Internazionali di Stresa, insieme ai prestigiosi impegni all’estero.

(Written on November 4, 2010 )