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In today’s news: Euphonium player mixes it with a sax mouthpiece, and Spotify and Apple Music jumped by more than 69% subscribers in the US during first half of the year. Moritzburg Festival close to Dresden starts today, and Unesco chair for musicology Weimar/Jena inaugurated. How historic bassoons bring together generations, and Federal Minister of Natural Resources Jim Carr shows his oboe skills in public.

Choir and Organ

Psallite Women’s Choir: Sing a Song of Joy

The premiere of a new work by Janet Wheeler was given on 29 June by the female voice choir Psallite at The Old Church, Stoke Newington, in London.

Cmuse

Euphonium Player Mixes it with a Sax Mouthpiece

Brian Wilson, renowned euphonium player introduced us to the most unconventional musical instrument recently when he merged a euphonium with a baritone saxophone mouthpiece.

Music Business World

YouTube loses ground on US subscription music streaming in first six months of 2017

The volume of subscription streams on the likes of Spotify and Apple Music jumped by more than 69% in the US during the first half of this year to 141.3bn – dramatically outperforming the number of online music video streams in the same period.

Classic FM

This is why fast food restaurants play classical music at night

Playing classical music in the late hours of the day appears to be part of the mass fast-food chain effort to combat rowdy behaviour in their branches.

Frankfurter Allgemeine

Das Leben, das Leben, das Leben

Die Berliner Volksbühne verabschiedet sich von Intendant Frank Castorf – und sagt mit Feiern und einer späten Christoph-Schlingensief-Filmpremiere adieu.

Concerti

Musik im Märchenschloss

Am Rande des idyllischen Dresden liegt ein noch idyllischeres Schloss. Dort hob der Cellist Jan Vogler 1993 das Moritzburg Festival aus der Taufe.

Pizzicato

Alexandre Bloch verlängert bei Düsseldorfer Symphonikern

Der französische Dirigent hat seinen Vertrag als Erster Gastdirigent der Düsseldorfer Symphoniker um weitere drei Jahre verlängert.

Kulturradio

Unesco-Lehrstuhl für Musikwissenschaft eingeweiht

Mit einem Lehrstuhl an den Hochschulstandorten Weimar und Jena will die deutsche Unesco-Kommission die Erforschung von Musiktraditionen fördern.

KQED

Historic Bassoon Brings Two Generations of Musicians Together for a Special Concert in Palo Alto

Much like a Stradivarius is to the violin world, a Heckel is considered one of the gold standards in bassoons.

CTV News

Oboe-playing minister trades cabinet duties for centre-stage with WSO

Federal Minister of Natural Resources Jim Carr has hit many high notes in his career. Before he entered politics, he was a journalist, a CEO — and a professional oboe player.

Twitter

: On sunday it’s time again for We’ll be streaming live at Max-Joseph-Platz from 6pm Bring sunshine

: Artcodes. Ólafur Elíasson vs. Krzysztof Warlikowski.

Schloss Moritzburg © Oliver Killig

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(Written on July 5, 2017 )

Account Manager Victoria Cappelletti’s views on working as a PR in Paris and London: Differences, difficulties & evolution

Over one year ago I moved to London to start working at WildKat PR as an Account Manager. I had previously worked for two years in the music industry in Paris, at a major record label and also in an independent PR agency with a similar structure to WildKat.

Being aware of the stakes of promoting independent and emerging artists in Paris, I was curious to see and experience the differences between the industries, seeking new professional challenges and looking forward to tame British journalists.

As I had previously worked with UK and international clients, I already had an insight into some of the differences, however, after a year of working as a press officer in London, I was able to find distinctive quirks.

wildkat-pr-tower-bridge-eiffel-tower

In my opinion, big record labels and majors rule music industries. That’s the case in both the UK and France. Independent, alternative and emergent artists thus struggle (more) to rise and thrive with their art.

As the French government cuts budgets for culture, the media has to focus on bigger artists, or at least on the ones that will gain a more significant audience. I could see that they were sliding dangerously from programming artists that they are personally passionate about, to generating profit for the media. As someone who is, and has always been so passionate about music, spending entire evenings digging for unknown tunes on Soundcloud, it makes me quite sad.

My knowledge of the UK government’s decisions for culture (apart from Brexit which will have an important impact on diversity in my humble French opinion) is limited, but it seems quite obvious that there are way more opportunities for new artist, to perform but also to be featured in the media.

Regarding live performances, for example, maybe it comes from the fact that all things cultural don’t happen in central London, as it is in Paris intra-muros, but alternative, emergent, underground cultural opportunities blossom in zone 2 and 3, whereas it is almost impossible to make Parisians cross the city centre’s limits.

Hence, there is a profusion of music venues, from established concert halls to basements and Pizza Express, that allow emerging bands and underground composers to perform their music or art, get visibility and improve their talent.

It also seems that there are more channels and ways to promote artists in the UK.

For example, I was able to secure a piece in a national newspaper for my first campaign, whereas the journalist had never heard from me before, and my sharp French accent couldn’t fool anyone.

Of course relationships with the media are the key to being a good and efficient PR. But here in the UK, I’ve felt like journalists are more open-minded and if you pitch to them right, offering an interesting idea, they will say yes.

In France, it’s more difficult to offer something original, and journalists are not likely to respond to you unless they know you. Maybe it’s also the case here, but simply in my experience, it’s not.

I’ve learnt that here anything is basically possible, if you put enough creativity and resources into it. This is an integral part of the culture at WildKat and has taught me a new way to approach to PR. The French music industry is obviously still strong, and there are still great things to do – it just seemed to me that without a strong record label behind them, emerging artists had less chances to be promoted in media and programmed in a venue, even the smallest.

 

Note: Beyond the PR and media industry, I think the differences between the two countries are probably beyond business. It’s social, it’s a way of working, communicating, and thinking.

The UK has seen the birth of major underground musical movements such as punk, grime and trip-hop. It’s the home of beautiful weirdos, from Elton John to Boy George to David Bowie, among so many others.

wildkat-pr-david-bowie-vystava-berlinPhoto: DesignMagazin.cz

I believe that all these cultural developments and their leaders ‘used’ people’s minds to be more open, accepting, experiencing and enjoying alternative and underground music and art movements.

Generally, the UK is known for being a cool country, where people won’t judge you for your half-balled turquoise haircut, wearing shorts in January, or the music you are listening to. I’ve seen youngsters sing along to rock songs next to quiet old men in the pub.

I am not saying France is behind in terms of music – it has the 2nd best hip-hop scene, many other amazing weirdos and a new generation of artists that are now making their way across the Channel and beyond – for example, Christine & The Queens whom I’m always glad to see on billboards here in London.

wildkat-pr-christine-and-the-queens-refuse-proposalsPhoto: momo.works/ refuse proposals

We have a great new wave of music, which I think and hope will go far.

I believe Paris should open its ‘borders’ offer more exciting opportunities to emerging artists through reopening old venues, rehabilitating others, and take (some) inspiration in London’s music life’s landscape.

wildkat-pr-victoria-cappelletti

Photo: Victoria Cappelletti

(Written on December 15, 2016 )

WildKat PR are delighted to announce the launch of an exciting and innovative new scheme heralded by our founder Kathleen Alder. The Noted Innovation Fellowship focuses on providing support to talented 22-35 year olds with original ideas in the area of arts administration which will shake up, progress and lead the classical music industry and culture sector into the future; it needs more than just artists.

Whilst there are many funding opportunities dedicated to discovering and supporting new performing talent, Kathleen has recognised a clear need in the industry for financial support to be awarded to young professionals keen to make their mark behind-the-scenes. Currently, aspiring arts prodigies are most likely to be supported by those who have had over 20 years’ experience and although their experience is vital and appreciated, Kathleen believes there is much more untapped potential to attract fresh new talent.

As well as offering £3,500 to help implement the recipient’s idea, the Fellowship will provide industry opportunities and mentorship by some of the most high profile names working for prestigious organisations such as Executive Producer of Opus Arte/Royal Opera House Ben Pateman; Grammy award winning music producer Christopher Alder; and Suzanne Davidson, the Executive Director of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. The list continues to grow. Alongside the standard prize winnings, the Fellowship will be customized around the individual and their idea in order to maximize their full potential.  With this Fellowship, Kathleen aims to educate and inspire a new generation of diverse and creative cultural leaders.

WildKat PR are excited for the talent that will emerge from this venture.

For application details, click here. The deadline is midnight (GMT) on 15th February 2015.

Kat1-11-590x260 Kathleen Alder. Photo: International Arts Manager 

 

(Written on January 13, 2015 )

During this year’s Proms, WildKat PR spent a week outside the Royal Albert Hall asking queuing prommers their opinion on developing technologies vs. the classical music industry. Our findings were maybe not as varied as first predicted, as it was expected that aspects such as age and experience would affect opinion.

We found that across the generations, the most integral part of developed technology, the Internet, is widely accepted, with most people finding classical music online. However, the conventional aspect of classical music, such as the use of sheet music, the live concert and traditional, non-electric instruments is preferred even if some do embrace change as it happens.

Prommers were open to the use of electric instruments in some situations but not universally. Appropriateness was dependent on factors such as the time period of the composition, which instrument was being made electric and whether it was being played by a soloist or a member of the orchestra.

The younger generation of concert goers were positive about the use of social media for artist promotion, saying it increases accessibility. They also find facebook and twitter a useful tool for finding out about classical music events, although this is not a substitute for a personal recommendation from a friend, teacher or family member.

Defying stereotypes, the older generation were not of the opinion that we have ‘lost’ precious concert going traditions to technology. However, they were mostly negative about the practice of filming concerts with phones, saying that it caused unwanted noise, was disrespectful to the artist and prevented full appreciation of the concert. They were cautious about allowing reviews to affect their concert going habits and opinions were mixed as to whether they would trust a review from a professional journalist in a respected publication more than a review from a blogger.

With regards to television, most people find concerts on TV less engaging than the live experience, but like the idea of being able to see conductors and musicians close up, which is a view that wouldn’t be possible in the concert hall. Also, all prommers asked said they saw the benefit in televising concerts as it reaches out to a new audience, who then might want to see a concert live. However, the live performance remains the most vital part of a classical music experience.

(Written on September 6, 2013 )