Posts Tagged ‘London 2012’
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Arts Beat, New York Times

Abbado, Blaming Health Problem, Cancels Plans for Japan Concerts

Citing ill health, Italian conductor Claudio Abbado has canceled plans for a series of concerts in Japan with the Lucerne Festival Orchestra — including one at an inflatable concert hall in Matsushima that was to be dedicated to a region recovering from the 2011 earthquake.

Annie Proulx Writes Libretto for ‘Brokeback Mountain’ Opera

Author of  Brokeback Mountain will turn her short story into the libretto for Charles Wuorinen’s opera.

Pacific Standard

Playing Prokofiev is a Pain:  The Physical Toll of Being a Musician

A new study from Australia finds working as an orchestral musician takes an intense physical toll.  It reports 84% of professional orchestral musicians in that nation have experienced “performance-impairing pain” at some point, and 50% were experiencing symptoms at the time of the survey.

BBC News

Does music in the workplace help or hinder?

Police in England and Wales paid £660,952 for licences so staff could listen to music in offices in the past year, a Freedom of Information request has revealed. But does music played at work help or hinder employees, asks Vanessa Barford.

Liverpool choirboy Jack Topping, 11, lands record deal

Choirboy is the youngest person to be signed by the Decca label who turned down the Beatles and will release his debut album in November.

Times

Sir Simon Rattle tipped to take top job with the LSO

Sir Simon Rattle’s performance as he conducted Mr Bean and the London Symphony Orchestra at the Opening Ceremony of the London Games last year may be a hint of things to come after he steps down from the Berlin Philharmonic in 2017.

Classic FM Online

Opera-singing hot dog vendor is sacked

A hot dog salesman in Kansas who is famous for his unique opera-singing style of salesmanship has been sacked.

The Telegraph

Film composers: a director’s best friend

“Hitchcock only finishes a picture 60 per cent,” the composer Bernard Herrmann liked to say. “I have to finish it for him.” As the BBC begins its Sound of the Cinema season, Sean Macaulay celebrates the fine art of the film composer.

Der Tagesspiegel

Fluch der Gießkanne

Berlins Freie Szene braucht neue Fördermodelle und klare kulturpolitische Bekenntnisse. Das ist nicht schwierig – und auch nicht teuer.

BBC News

BBC News

 

(Written on September 12, 2013 )

This week at the Proms we talked to many young Prommers about their thoughts on the link between fashion and classical music. Many of them were attending the Proms for the first time, so had really thought about what to wear to the Royal Albert Hall.

We really enjoyed talking to 17-year-old twins, Shannon and Jo, who visited Prom 32 to see their sister perform Bernstein’s Mass. They normally attend pop or rock music concerts but admitted that the change in musical styles for them that evening meant that they dressed smarter than usual. As both girls are interested in fashion, they said they would be looking out for what the performers were wearing, and hoped it wouldn’t be distracting or inappropriate.

Two musicians, Justin and Joe, had contrasting views on the fashion of performers and the audience. As Joe doesn’t care about the audience’s style when he is on stage, he tends to wear exactly what he likes to a concert. On the other hand, Justin really considered the details of the repertoire when choosing his outfit for the Proms. As he had performed the piece of music before, he thought about the meaning of it and how he could express that himself as a spectator in the Royal Albert Hall.

Read more about the Prommers’ opinions, with many more photos and stories, on our Fashion at the Proms Pinterest Board.

(Written on August 7, 2012 )

It is nigh on impossible to be in London this week and avoid the Olympics; whilst the Big Smoke may be quieter than usual in some parts of the town, there still seems to be an Olympic official, a fan or #teamGB T-shirt-wearer in every (nearly deserted) tube carriage.
And so the world of Classical Music has been infiltrated by the Olympics, too. Or rather, Classical Music has infiltrated the Olympics.

Nineteen members of the Canadian Olympic team have this week been revealed to be classical musicians, members of Conservatoires back in Canada but are, this month, just focusing on the sporting side of their talents.

There was no nod to popular music in the selection of Olympic flag bearers of 2012 but it was conductor Daniel Barenboim, who proudly stood as one of the eight great humanitarians, chosen for his services to music and peacekeeping. This was most notably due to his creation of the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, bringing together young musicians in his home country of Israel regardless of their political position or origin either side of the Palestine/Israel border.

The Arts Desk

During a celebration of ‘England’s green and pleasant lands’, Parry’s Jerusalem was touchingly sung by 11-year-old Humphrey Keeper, leading The Dockhead Choir. Handel’s Water Music and Elgar’s Nimrod both featured at the dramatic moments of the event, whilst Ode to Joy was a debated contender for the show’s repertoire after David Beckham performed it in a Samsung advert using just his feet, talent and a football; however it never made the bill.

Speaking of Ode to Joy, this week Barenboim proclaimed Beethoven to be a ‘bit of an Olympian’ himself after conducting his medal worthy First to Ninth Symphonies all in eight days at the BBC proms. After the performance of the Ninth last Friday Barenboim was then rushed (most certainly using those Olympic traffic lanes!) to get to the Olympic stadium to carry the all-important flag.

Classical music was also given the chance to show its modern face and its sense of humour, with Sir Simon Rattle conducting whilst Mr. Bean was on the keyboard, contributing to the famous Vangelis music from Chariots of Fire. Whilst Rattle’s role was small, it featured a wonderful combination of classical music from the London Symphony Orchestra with Bean’s electronic input – probably the most crucial part of Vangelis’ wonderful theme tune. And so a famous Maestro and Britain’s famous comedian shared the stage. With even the Queen herself showing a sense of humour in her James Bond sketch, it was great to see Sir Simon Rattle dispersing stereotypes of stuffiness within classical music courtesy of his witty performance with Mr. Bean.

Classical music and its musicians actually feature in the most important moment for every single Olympian out there.  This year the London Philharmonic Orchestra recorded all 205 Olympic countries’ anthems in the legendary Abbey Road Studios with just 12 minutes allocated to record each individual piece. Despite the tight schedule that the anthems were completed in, they sound fantastic and boost every nation’s spirits each time a Gold is won. We just hope to hear ‘God Save the Queen’ a lot more over the next week…

The Daily Mail

(Written on August 3, 2012 )