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In today’s news: Dubai and BBC Proms strike for the globalisation of classical music, Maestro Anton Coppolla (100) leads Opera Tampa in concert, finalists for Windsor Festival International String announced, Spotify signs new licensing deals, New Bedford Symphony Picks Israeli Conductor, an interview with Generalmusikdirektor of Deutschen Oper Berlin Donald Runnicles, and International Bach Academy will perform on Bach’s 332 birthday on next Tuesday. Wednesday was a big day for the New York Philharmonic, both onstage and in its offices, and Nottingham elementary school student Matthew Smith is dreaming of conducting his own orchestra.

The National

Dubai and BBC Proms strike a chord for the globalisation of classical music

In Nairobi, children kick a football down the street pretending to be Ronaldo. In London, K-pop is on MTV. And in an Abu Dhabi mall, a queue forms outside the latest bubble-­tea cafe. We have all become familiar with the continuous creep of globalisation. So it’s not surprising that, like other industries, classical music hasn’t been left behind.

Musicalchairs

100 Year Old Conductor, Maestro Anton Coppola to Lead Opera Tampa in Concert, 3/25

March 21, 2017 marks the 100th birthday of Maestro Anton Coppola, the conductor and composer whose career has spanned from singing in the Metropolitan Opera Children’s Chorus for the American premiere of Puccini’s Turandot at age 9 to – 91 years later – conducting his own an alternate ending for Puccini’s unfinished masterpiece, one of two new works to be premiered on March 25th at Coppola Conducts: 100 Years Young.

The Strad

Windsor Festival International String Competition names three finalists

The sixth Windsor Festival International String Competition has announced the three violinists selected to perform in tomorrow’s final, held in the Waterloo Chamber of Windsor Castle, UK.

Music Business Worldwide

Spotify to sign new licensing deals with major labels ‘within weeks’?

It’s been nearly two years since Spotify fell out of a long-term licensing deal with Universal Music Group.

Rhinegold

Britten-Pears Foundation appoints Sir Vernon Ellis as chair

The Britten–Pears Foundation has appointed Sir Vernon Ellis as its new chair. He will succeed Nick Prettejohn, who is to step down in early June after eight years in post.

Pizzicato

New Bedford Symphony Picks Israeli Conductor

The New Bedford Symphony Orchestra (Massachusetts) has announced Yaniv Dinur as its new music director.

Der Tagesspiegel

„Wagner machte mich zu dem, der ich bin“

Abschied von Götz Friedrichs „Ring“: Donald Runnicles, Generalmusikdirektor der Deutschen Oper Berlin, über alte und neue Nibelungen, die Liebe zu Benjamin Britten und seine Vertragsverlängerung

Süddeutsche Zeitung

Das ist sehr sadistisch

Er spielt Beethoven und Strawinsky, nebenbei entwirft er Schuhe und Parfums. Theodor Currentzis gilt als Ausnahme unter den Dirigenten und reist mit eigenem Ensemble.

concerti

„Mont Blanc der Kirchenmusik“

Am 21.3.2017 feiert Johann Sebastian Bach seinen 332. Geburtstag. Die Internationale Bachakademie begeht diesen Tag mit der Aufführung eines seiner bedeutendsten Werke, der „h-Moll-Messe“

The New York Times

New Concerto, New Leader: A Big Day at the New York Philharmonic

Wednesday was a big day for the New York Philharmonic, both onstage and in its offices.

WQXR.org

This 11-Year-Old British Boy is Set to Make his Conducting Debut (Video)

While his fellow 11-year-olds are playing video games or daring one another to eat stomach-churning food combinations, Nottingham elementary school student Matthew Smith is dreaming of conducting his own orchestra.

Twitter

Classical Music News  John Malkovich: ‘Politics has gone through a portal into an alternate universe’

klassik.com Haydn Bozen und Trient 2017 erhält 2,7 Millionen Euro

Image: Broadwayworld

(Written on March 17, 2017 )

The UK voted yesterday in a historic referendum and made the decision to leave the European Union by 51.9%. Not only is the country still hugely divided in opinion, but the immediate reaction came with the pound dropping to its lowest level against the dollar since 1985, followed by Prime Minister David Cameron announcing his resignation earlier this morning.

What implication does Brexit have on the arts industry?

There is one thing that is certain at this time: the outcome and impact of Brexit is unknown.  We have summarised several key points from industry experts (as long as we’ve not “had enough” of them yet) and industry professionals, so that we can begin to evaluate the effect on the arts & culture industry as we begin to move forward.

The Association of British Orchestras released their statement earlier today. They noted that the “prospects for the nation’s public finances are worrying, and may affect the implementation of Orchestra Tax Relief, which has not as yet received Royal Assent, and lead to further reductions in public funding for the arts and local authorities.” As well as finances, the ABO also highlight the problems that could be caused by restrictions to freedom of movement across Europe’s borders, which is an incredibly important issue for many orchestras, ensembles and even solo musicians.

Will UK acts require a visa for each country they want to perform in and, in return, will European acts be able to tour through Britain as they did before? Rob Hallett, CEO of Robomagic states: “Anyone who has ever tried to go from the EU into Russia to perform will be having nightmares about six-hour border crossings with additional, expensive days off between shows in order to allow for possible delays.” (Music Week). As well as touring and performing restrictions, there will be serious implications for copyright protection throughout Europe (Billboard). BPI’s Geoff Taylor previously stated that as the music business is founded on copyright, copyright rules are fundamental to its future success.

Arts and culture businesses will feel the consequences amongst their employees, as they often have a high percentage of European staff. Universal Music and Beggars Group has previously stood up to encourage the remain in the EU and warned that “a victory for Brexit would be economically, politically, socially and culturally disastrous – for all of us” (Music Business Worldwide).

Here at WildKat PR, we are a truly international company. We have offices in London, Berlin and New York. Our team is made up of people from the UK, France, Germany, Spain, Canada and the US. Our clients are based all across the world. We are very lucky to enjoy the perks of European travel and a multi-national community. As with many other businesses in the arts & culture industry, we are anxious to hear what will come from this result.

The UK arts & culture industry has responded in the same way as most, with hope yet concerns for the future:

“Referendum result – Royal College of Music remains committed to our global community of talented students and staff” – The Royal College of Music

“We are very, very good at adapting and surviving. I am absolutely convinced that the British music scene will put its best foot forward and come out of this in the best possible state. But that’s not the same thing as saying, ‘It’s all fine for everyone’.” – Stephen Maddock, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra

“Within the UK, we will play our part in helping to bridge divides within and between the nations and regions of the country.”  John Kampfner, Creative Industries Federation

“The worst outcome for our members will be additional uncertainty, bureaucracy and expense, allied to a worsening of their financial viability. The ABO’s next step is to build on our existing good relations with the government and engage positively with whichever Ministers take responsibility from here on, to ensure the best possible outcome for our members.” Association of British Orchestras

Not only the music industry will be affected by Brexit; the entertainment industry is heavily reliant on funds from the EU. Hit series Game Of Thrones relies, amongst others, on an injection of money from the EU’s European Regional Development Fund, which is designed to stimulate economic growth across the EU (The Guardian). With these funds cut off, hundreds of jobs created by the series in Northern Ireland are in danger. Game Of Thrones is, of course, only the most popular of a wide range of projects that have until now received funding from the EU in order to keep them running.

With the decision made, the United Kingdom will now face major changes with an unpredictable outcome.

What are the biggest positives and challenges that Brexit will bring? Comment below or tweet your thoughts to @WildKatPR.

Tweets

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Via @ClassicFM

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Via The Stage

(Written on June 24, 2016 )