Posts Tagged ‘musicology’
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In today’s news: BASCA announces election results. Nadine Sierra explores American opera and song in new album. Musicologist Robert Pascall has passed away. Cambridge Live has announced details of its 29th orchestral series. Ricardo Muti stops Chicago Symphony Orchestra mid-performance after cough from audience member. Richard Strauss Orchestra Academy cancelled this year. Bach reinvented: the Bach music festival with musical saws and nyckelharpa. Music Festival Krzyżowa – how a music festival transformed a sleepy village in Poland.

Rhinegold

Nadine Sierra to release album with Deutsche Grammophon and Decca Gold

Soprano Nadine Sierra has made her first album for Deutsche Grammophon and Decca Gold, having signed a contract with the labels last year.

Basca

Board and Committee Election Results Announced

Over the past few weeks, Professional and Standard members have been voting for BASCA members to represent them on the BASCA Board, and our Classical, Songwriter and Jazz Committees.

Rhinegold

Cambridge Orchestral Concert Series 2018-19 announced

Cambridge Live has announced details of its 29th orchestral series at the Corn Exchange.

The Guardian

Robert Pascall obituary

Robert Pascall, the musicologist and Brahms scholar, has died aged 74. His dedication to Brahms (and slight resemblance to him) was lifelong, from his DPhil at Oxford to the crowning glory of his career: new critical editions of the Brahms Symphonies for the complete edition of the composer’s works published between 1996 and 2012.

The Herald

Obituary: Joyce Blackham, opera singer

Joyce Blackham, who has died aged 84, was a mezzo-soprano who was renowned for her singing of the fiery cigarette girl in Bizet’s Carmen. At the beginning of her career she sang it with Sadler’s Wells Opera (SWO) and joined another young singer, Placido Domingo, in regional opera houses in America and at the New York City Opera.

Limelight

Riccardo Muti stops mid-performance after audience member coughs

The famously stern maestro brought the Chicago Symphony Orchestra to a halt after noise from the audience interrupted a quiet moment in the music.

The Violin Channel

Prizes Awarded at United States’ 2018 Washington International String Competition

Violinist Youjin Lee, violist Muriel Garnet Razavi and cellist Tony Rymer have been awarded 1st prizes at the 2018 Washington International String Competition

klassik.com

Richard-Strauss Orchesterakademie muss abgesagt werden

Die “Internationale Richard-Strauss-Orchesterakademie”, die als eine Säule der Neuausrichtung des Richard-Strauss-Festivals junge Musiker an das Werk von Richard Strauss heranführen sollte, kann in diesem Jahr nicht stattfinden.

NMZ

“Stelzenfestspiele”: Bach mit Obertongesang und Schlüsselfidel

Johann Sebastian Bach bleibt eine unerschöpfliche Inspirationsquelle für Musiker: Bei den “Stelzenfestspielen bei Reuth” im Dreiländereck von Bayern, Sachsen und Thüringen wurden am Samstag Werke des Komponisten in ungewöhnlicher Ausführung geboten – verjazzt oder klassisch, mit Obertongesang und auf Instrumenten wie Schlüsselfidel und Singender Säge.

Concerti

Musikalische Begegnungen

Erst 2015 wurde das Festival Krzyżowa-Music gegründet und hat schon jetzt ein schlesisches 200-Seelen-Dorf zu einem kulturellen Hotspot gemacht.

Twitter

Riccardo Muti conducting the Australian World Orchestra. Photo © David Collins

(Written on June 26, 2018 )

Lately, it seems like the younger generation is divided into two. One half is permanently glued to their digital device, drowning in social media, and can hardly imagine their life without Netflix and Instagram. The other half are rebelling, attempting something easily described as a “digital detox”.

A Digital detox can be defined as a period of time during which a person steps back from using electronic devices such as smartphones or computers in order to disconnect to the online world. By many, it is regarded as an opportunity to reduce stress or focus on real-life social interactions. Stress is proven to be caused by being connected, being online (literally), being available to anyone’s whim 24 hours per day, every day. A recent study from regulator Ofcom concluded that, on average, UK adults spend 25 hours a week online. And that number is constantly increasing.

So can classical music help us to escape the digital chokehold?

Listening to classical music

It is generally accepted that classical music has many positive effects on our brains, sometimes known as “the Mozart effect”. Listening to classical music is proven to boost memory function, sparks creativity, improves productivity and generally makes us feel happier and more relaxed. It can even improve the quality of our (much needed) sleep and help to ease symptoms of depression and melancholy. So why not to turn your phone off, take a deep breath and meditate while listening to classical music after a long working day or just before going to sleep? In our busy and over-connected world it is important to have some time for yourself, to slow things down and classical music is a perfect source of relaxation.

Learning an instrument

From recent research, musical instrument training can have a surprising effect on the structure of our brain. This concerns not only children but also adults and the elderly. Learning an instrument increases the capacity of our memory, enhances spatial reasoning and improves literacy skills. Moreover, musical training requires us to concentrate on one task at once. Concentrating on one task can help us to stay productive; not only while learning an instrument, but one can apply this knowledge to many other crucial tasks.

Attending classical music concerts

Listening to classical music encourages us to think deeply, connect better to ourselves and also connect to the people around us. Going to venues also means connecting to real people, talking to them, and socialising in real life. Sometimes we all need to take a step back from technology now and again. Attending classical music venues reminds us of being fully present in the world. Moreover, classical music concerts are beautiful, not only aurally, but also visually.

Considering all the benefits of classical music, we can utilise it to make our digital detox easier and our life more mindful and deliberate. Likewise, classical music helps us relax and put ourselves in a better mood. So, let’s switch off our mobile phones from time to time and allow us to be unavailable. Or, to put it in in the words of Chris Baréz-Brown: “Get lost in music with others and you might just find yourself.”

(Written on November 29, 2017 )