Posts Tagged ‘networking’
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In today’s news: Restoration of Beethoven Concert Hall in Bonn to be more expensive than anticipated. Take a look at how Europe’s opera houses have won over under-30 audiences. Musical director and composer Samuel Adler who fled under Nazi rule returns to Berlin on visit. Fresh crisis at English National Opera as key figure quits. Why musicians struggle with mental health problems. Melbourne International Chamber Music Competition – take a look at what is in store. YouTube music now available in UK.

Wall Street Journal

How Europe’s Opera Houses Won Over Millennials

With an escape game and networking events, La Scala and the Paris Opera are attracting under-30 audiences.

Limelight

Melbourne International Chamber Music Competition

Sixteen ensembles will battle it out in Melbourne this July. We take a look at what’s in store for competitors and audiences at one of the world’s great chamber music launching pads.

The Guardian

Fresh crisis at English National Opera as key figure quits

Producing director Terri-Jayne Griffin to leave, with others claiming ENO ‘lacks ambition’.

Rhinegold

University of Glasgow Chapel Choir honour former director

The University of Glasgow Chapel Choir has released a new recording, We Were Glad, in memory of former director Dr Stuart Campbell.

The Guardian

Perfectionism and poverty: why musicians struggle with mental health

Mental illness claims the lives of too many in music. A new helpline seeks to change that. 

iNews

NHS at 70: How Art, from Andy Warhol to Brian Eno, has helped to heal patients

Introducing uplifting art into that environment brings therapeutic benefits for both staff and patients, the NHS has long recognised.

What Hi Fi

YouTube Music is now available in the UK…

Last month, YouTube announced a new, Spotify-rivalling music streaming service that looks set to replace Google Play Music. And now it has launched in the UK, as well as sixteen other countries including US, Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Spain and Sweden.

Pizzicato

Sanierung der Beethovenhalle Bonn wird noch teurer

Die Kostenspirale bei der Sanierung der Beethovenhalle dreht sich weiter. Die aktuelle Kostenberechnung belaufe sich auf rund 84 Millionen Euro, teilte die Stadt mit.

Klassik Heute

Wiener Staatsoper trauert um Hubert Deutsch

Die Wiener Staatsoper trauert um ihren ehemaligen Vizedirektor Reg. Rat. Professor Hubert Deutsch, der am Samstag, 16. Juni 2018 im Alter von 93 Jahren in Wien verstorben ist.

Der Tagesspiegel

Vergeben, ohne zu vergessen

Die Nazis verbrannten die Partituren seines Vaters, die Familie floh in die USA. Jetzt ist der Komponist und Dirigent Samuel Adler zu Besuch in Berlin.

Le Monde

La Sacem déploie ses trésors en ligne

La société des auteurs de musique a créé un musée virtuel pour mettre en valeur ses archives.

Twitter

University of Glasgow Chapel (c) Rhinegold

(Written on June 20, 2018 )

We’re delighted to announce the next Noted Roundtables in Berlin and London on 12th and 14th March 2018 respectively.

Following our initial roundtable on entrepreneurship, which attracted lots of interesting and detailed feedback, we’re very happy to announce our second topic for discussion:

International Women’s Day took places on Thursday 8 March 2018 and with it comes a huge number of initiatives and opportunities for women with the aim of equality across the sector. We want to explore these initiatives and start to develop solutions on how to diversify the administrative structure of the classical music industry to include more minorities.

As part of this discussion we want to find out how to target, engage, and support minorities (including those from BAME backgrounds, low socio-economic backgrounds, those with disabilities, women, and more).

Questions to be answered:

  • How can women in the industry help to diversify the sector even more, helping and supporting other minority groups?
  • What can “woke” male-led companies do to bring in a more diverse workforce?
  • Where does the lack of diversity in the classical music industry start? Is it in the classroom? How can we remedy that?

Rather than discussing the problem, we want to find the solutions.

A huge thank you to our client, the Royal Over-Seas League, for hosting us in one of their beautiful rooms in London. Why not check out ROSL’s Annual Music Competition on Tuesday? Details here.

Also we’re very grateful to Idagio for hosting us in Berlin. We’re sure that you know them already but if you’ve somehow missed this impressive, sleek streaming platform, check them out here.

Sign up for Berlin and London and let’s #PressForProgress!

(Written on March 9, 2018 )

Are you a young graduate who is eager to network, meet new people, try something new and do business? Orpheus Sinfonia, themselves outstanding recent graduates, are hosting a networking event alongside their next concert Beneath The Score: The Love Triangle on 23rd March. There will be opportunities to meet other like-minded people before the concert, during the interval, and also afterwards over a drink or two.

There are many networking events out there but this one will be unique in its combination of business and culture. The concert’s theme focuses around classical music’s most famous love triangle between husband and wife Robert and Clara Schumann and their friend Johannes Brahms. Who will win over Clara in the end? Far from being your stereotypical concert, the music will be explained in a simple yet informative way, perfect for the classical music novice. Armed with this knowledge, you will be able to talk intelligently about culture when entertaining your clients back at the office. The concert is also a great excuse to take time out of your busy schedule to relax: being a young graduate can be tough if you are in a new city, job and routine.

So, come along, enjoy some great music, get noticed and make connections for yourself and your company.

Don’t forget your business cards!

Beneath The Score: The Love Triangle, St George’s Hanover Square, 19:30, 23rd March. Reserve your £5 tickets by emailing clara@wildkatpr.com

Orpheus Networking Blog

(Written on March 12, 2015 )

Last night, WildKat PR attended ‘Shape-shifting: Classical Music in the Media’ an event organised by YPIA (young people in the arts), an organisation which aims to provide regular networking opportunities for young people working in the arts. Last night’s panel discussion focussed on the changing ways in which audiences consume classical music beyond the concert platform and explored the evolving media through which the genre is promoted and developed in the age of the Internet. The four inspirational panellists were John Bridcut, Steve Long, Ben Pateman and Hannah Taylor.

The event achieved its aim of attracting a notably young audience. The panellists agreed that the classical music industry has changed remarkably in the last twenty years – improved recording technology has made it far easier and cheaper for people to make recordings, therefore reducing the label market. It is also harder for musicians to make money; they are having to look to alternate ways of making a living including teaching and outreach.

Despite this, there was a consensus amongst the panellists and audience that live music is alive and well, compared to the deteriorating recording industry. Where there is diminishing classical music audiences, it is not the fault of the music but perceptions of the audience – in the UK classical music is seen as a kind of club for the elder and elite; the ‘rules’ of a concert often put newcomers off. This was compared to Berlin where a speaker had attended a concert packed with young people where audiences were allowed come and go, drink beer and check their phones; and San Francisco, where the city orchestra has a twitter zone where audiences can tweet about the performance uninterrupted. It was pointed out that audiences vary widely between types of performance: ballet audiences are often younger and in their 20s, whereas opera audiences are much older.

“What is wrong with opera?”
“Where can we begin!?”

The speakers encouraged young artists, agents and PR managers in the audience to make use of new technologies availabel to promote themselves and in turn keep the industry moving. Social media is very accessible, youtube was highly recommended by the panel – anyone can build up a following over time. The Aurora orchestra and composer Eric Whitacre were given as examples of social media-savvy members of the classical music industry.

The speakers were all extremely well-informed in their fields and successfully engaged their young audience. WildKat PR wishes YPIA well with their event series – you can join them for networking drinks on April 9th.

YPIA photo 1

YPIA photo 2

(Written on March 21, 2014 )

John Sandall

Data Scientist – YPlan

Chris Sheldrick

Founder – what3words

Jack Waley-Cohen

Co-founder – what3words

Last night’s Noted event hosted by WildKat PR and Sane & Able took a creative look at the world of apps and app building, with three professionals from the industry. These speakers included John Sandall – Data Scientist at YPlan – Chris Sheldrick – Founder of what3words – and Jake Waley-Cohen – Co-founder of what3words.

As with previous Noted events, last night the WildKat PR and Sane & Able offices were full to the brim with people from a variety of professions, students and enterprising individuals hoping to learn from the experience of the speakers and meet like-minded people. This event was particularly helpful for those who were interested in building an app, or those with questions about whether an app would be right for their business or idea. The speakers provided helpful and realistic advice and encouragement about what it is like to start, maintain and maintain success with an app as well as insider advice and tips.

When considering the preparations necessary to create a successful app, Jack Waley-Cohen of what3words emphasised the importance of planning: “If you seem to be running low on money (ie 6 months or less) then it will be much harder to get investment – make sure you plan.” Although financial backing is practically very important Chris Sheldrick added how people, team and ideas are also crucial: “If people get your idea quickly as well as being enthusiastic about it, they’re good to get on board with your team.” Given what the professionals from what3words said last night, not only is planning important but certainty of ideas and gaining support for the overall app is also imperative for success, including support found in people close to home: Chris mentioned that great additions to their team were found in people who were recommended or even friends of friends.

For fine tuning app ideas and businesses, YPlan’s John Sandall gave some great advice in stating the importance of focusing on quality not quantity. To really get an app going he said “Your idea HAS to be real and viable”. Jack Waley-Cohen added that getting an outside perspective from an industry professional is a good way to go about doing this: “To find out whether your app idea is good, then talk further with developer and see what they offer for their involvement!” Also, although YPlan is now a great success, John mentioned that YPlan was actually the 50th idea the founders had come up with. Taking time to fine tune the right idea that will get the consumer interested is worth the deliberation before you take your app dreams any further.

A great question raised was: ‘In what way can you get your app out to market and interest from the masses?’ what3words offered that they used a big PR push, however as Chris said: “we initially just put it out there without marketing to make sure we had feedback first”. It seems important not to waste time but instead to get your idea out there in order to get a feel for how the app will be received by the consumer. This is a good start for finding areas and ideas to improve. YPlan’s John Sandall suggested a launch event where people are invited along with speakers talking about the app to get a buzz. In the early stages of launching an app, a concern raised was app ideas being ‘stolen’ and then copied and used by another company, however the speakers were in agreement that it is good to share your ideas to gain feedback. Also, in order to protect an app Chris of what3words explained that you can apply for a patent: “think of it as a buffer for a deterrent – by the time you get approved or not, your idea will be big enough…”  The IdeaSafe was also highly recommended, an online vault that protects your creativity and prevents idea theft.

The evening was an insightful success due to the excellent honest speakers; the atmosphere was alive with creative minds in discussion.

Take at look at our next event ‘Successful Social Media’ on Wednesday 26th March. The April Noted event ‘How To Rebrand’ has also been announced on Eventbrite.

Check out Noted via Twitter or Facebook for more quotes from the speakers and information about the event.

Check back soon for a video blog from last night’s guests!

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Photos by Oliver Hyde-Tetley

(Written on February 27, 2014 )

The Guardian

Polish tenor hits back after a ‘fanatical minority’ boos La Scala production

Piotr Beczala says he will not take another role in Italy after section of audience boos new production of La Traviata

Limelight Magazine

What’s the value of sacred music in a secular age?

Is sacred music past is sell-by? Religious leaders, musicians and non-believers share their views

Classic FM Online

Joseph Calleja hangs out with Snoop Dogg at Kennedy Center Honors

Maltese tenor Joseph Calleja performed an aria from Verdi’s Aïda last night at the Kennedy Center Honors ceremony

Andrea Bocelli Foundation donates $500k to MIT

Tenor Andrea Bocelli’s charity foundation has donated a sum of around $500,000 to aid MIT in researching new technology products for the blind

ABO

New Directions – Conference 2014

In 2014, after a break of 25 years, the ABO Conference returns to the capital for three days of crucial debate and discussion, networking and learning, and analysing of the future of the orchestral sector in the UK and around the world

Manassas Patch

Holiday Flash Mob: Manassas Cellist Leads First-Ever By Air Force Band

The flash mob took place in the middle of the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum

Drowned in Sound

Drowned in sound reveal their Top 20 albums of this year

A mix of genres and styles for the ‘ listmas’ of 2013

Der Tagesspiegel

Wuschelköpfe

Hat der 32-jährige Gustavo Dudamel das Zeug dazu, 2018 Sir Simon Rattles als Chefdirigent der Berliner Philharmoniker zu beerben? Jetzt war der Dirigent aus Venezuela mit Werken von Schubert, Beethoven und Strawinsky bei dem Orchester zu Gast

The Guardian

The Guardian

(Written on December 10, 2013 )

Chloe Wright

Partner and Head of the Music Group, Harbottle & Lewis LLP

George Babbington

Consultant at Harbottle & Lewis LLP

Last night’s Noted Talk ‘Music Money Matters’ was a truly engaging event, packed out with professionals keen to learn, hosted by WildKat PR and Sane & Able. The speakers for this talk were legal gurus: Chloe Wright and George Babbington from Music Law powerhouse Harbottle & Lewis. They offered advice and explained the basic legal processes which are key to the music business and are of the utmost importance for young musicians to learn.

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Advice came in all forms for our audience, from ‘if you are a professional musician, you should join the Musicians’ Union, as through them you can get free legal advice’ to ‘if you want to use a recording that a record company owns for a mixtape/remix, you have to go their licensing department’. As the audience ranged from DJs, Producers and musicians to those in PR, Marketing and Merchandise, all bases were truly covered by Chloe and George’s blanket of advice.

The talk was structured around four main areas which can be the main sources of income in the music industry: Recording (including advice on the best deals and how to be protected legally), Publishing, Merchandise and Live Performance (by far the biggest earner in the current industry).

Merchandise was a topic of the talk which leant itself to great advice for up and coming musicians, as it can be a great earner, a trend that was noticed in the last few decades: ‘With the rise of big indie bands in the 90s, the bands and managers were very quick on merch being a good source of income’. Merchandise company AMP Merchandise attended the event, and informed the audience about their services, they then enquired about the timing of starting to sell merch in an artists’ career, our speakers gave the advice that this should be as early as possible and as creative as you like!

The entire event was very informative, with engaging and articulate speakers, described by attendees as an ‘inspirational talk’, an ‘honest insightful night’ as well as a ‘great event… nice to meet some lovely people’.

Take at look at our next event which will take place on Wednesday November 20th ‘Noted Talks…Music and Advertising’. You can find this via the noted Eventbrite. The January event has also been announced on Eventbrite.

Check out Noted via Twitter or Facebook for more quotes from the speakers and information about the event.

Check back soon for a video blog from last night’s guests!

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Photos by Oliver Hyde-Tetley

Photos by Oliver Hyde-Tetley

 

 

(Written on October 24, 2013 )

In our second ‘Noted Talks’ event ‘Publishing Across Genres,’ our speakers raised many issues on the effect of new technology on the publishing industry. Kindles, Spotify and internet downloading; literature and music publishing will have to find ways to adapt to these technologies. We asked our guests whether they preferred digital or traditional books and music, check out our video blog to find out what they said!

(Written on September 17, 2013 )

Janis Susskind

Managing Director of Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishing

David McGinnis

Media and Music Manager at Mute Song

Martine Halban

Co-Founder and Director of Halban Publishers for books

Last night’s Noted Talk ‘Publishing Across Genres’ was a captivating event hosted by WildKatPR and Sane & Able. The evening featured three animated experts: Janis Susskind, David McGinnis and Martine Halban, who spoke on their knowledge and experience in Publishing. Throughout the evening, the speakers talked on the role of publishing in the worlds of music and the written word. They also contributed top advice in the area of self-publishing, which was applicable in a variety of ways for the eager attendees.

Many perspectives across the topics covered were highly valuable as light was shed on everything from how our speakers select what to publish, to the affect of new technologies on the industry. The importance of understanding the business was emphasised by Janis Susskind who explained the behind the scenes grass roots provisions needed for success: “For a year I typed index cards and memorized names, and learned the business from the ground up.” David McGinnis highlighted the validity of a gradual rise to the top: “Play some gigs, have some fans. Get some people throwing their underwear at you. Don’t go straight to sync”.

Martine Halban commented on the changes that the industry has undergone in the last twenty or so years: “In the 90s, Amazon started and the whole publishing scene changed. Now we are in the era of e-book publishing”. Interestingly, what arose is that it seems advanced technology has not merely removed older formats for accessing and listening to music, but more the emphasis has changed for these tools. Janis Susskind illustrates this: “I see more CDs being sold at classical venues. At the beginning we could never get a record company to agree to this”. David McGinnis took this one step further by explaining the potential value of CDs: “The physical disc might become like a piece of novelty merchandise”.

The entire evening was an eye opener into music publishing from professionals who were able to divulge valuable advice. It was an atmospheric evening full to the brim with young professionals and keen students, and the experience was both stimulating and informative with a good insight into the future of music publishing.

Take at look at our next event which will take place on Wednesday October 23rd ‘Noted Talks…Music Money Matters’. You can find this via the noted Event Bright.

Check out Noted via Twitter or Facebook for more quotes from the speakers and information about the event.

Check back soon for a video blog from last night’s guests!

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Oliver Hyde-Tetley

Oliver Hyde-Tetley

(Written on September 12, 2013 )

Screen Shot 2013-04-05 at 17.47.16

Today is WildKat PR’s fifth birthday and we have been reflecting in the office on some of the many highlights – events and concerts we have attended, as well as musicians and organisations we have been privileged to work with.

An almost impossible task would be to narrow these past years down to just five highlights, as there have been so many, but we have done our best:

Kathleen: Blogging with Ivor Bolton

One of my earliest clients was the conductor Ivor Bolton. We were working with him over a particularly busy season at Salzburg Festival and encouraged him to keep a behind the scenes blog while he was there. At the time, no-one else was doing this, and Ivor  received so much interest and positive feedback for his writing – it opened him up to a much wider, international audience and led to press coverage across Europe.

Vesna: Working with AyseDeniz Gokcin

When we began working with AyseDeniz, she had very little press in the UK, but since working with her, her classical reworking of Pink Floyd pieces have gone viral online and helped draw a huge ‘non-classical’ audience to classical music, and she’s shown that projects can be unusual and innovative without being gimmick-y. AyseDeniz is an example of a brilliant classical artist who happens to love her instrument and other musical styles so much that she tried to extract all possible sounds from it.

Fleur: Visiting the IAMA Conference 

When I began working with WildKat PR as an intern I was fortunate to be able to attend some of the networking events at the IAMA Conference. I was able to meet leading members of the industry, and to talk about WildKat. It was nerve-wracking but enjoyable and opened up a whole new world to me, making me even more eager and inspired to pursue a career in the classical music industry.

Victoria: Attending a performance of Don Giovanni in Baden Baden

In 2011 I was lucky enough to attend one of the performances of Don Giovanni in Baden Baden which was recorded and later released on Deutsche Grammophon. There are so many reasons that this concert sticks out as one of the highlights of my WildKat career, firstly because of its incredible cast: Ildebrando D’Arcangelo, Luca Pisaroni, Rolando Villazon, Joyce DiDonato, Mojca Erdmann and Diana Damrau conducted by Yannick  Nézet-Séguin. This was also the first time I’d travelled outside of the UK for work, Don Giovanni is my favourite opera of all time, AND afterwards I met my idol, Joyce. It’s the first and only time I have been professionally speechless.

Harriet: Silent Opera

As far as transport to concerts go, being taken by boat from Festival Pier to deepest darkest East London was a lovely experience and a great way to have a collective buzz from the whole audience before the show had even begun. The views down the Thames were breath taking and a hassle free trip meant for huge excitement for all when we finally arrived at the mysterious venue.

 

 

(Written on April 5, 2013 )