Posts Tagged ‘Noted’
« Back to E-News

We are happy to announce, that the winner of the 2017/18 Noted Fellowship is Ben Corrigan with his extraordinary podcast “excuse the mess”!

“We chose Ben Corrigan as this year’s winner because his podcast has an innovative and cogent approach to the realities and difficulties of the classical music market today. It is entertaining, intellectually demanding and whets the appetite for classical and contemporary music. I am very pleased to work alongside his project in the coming year.”
(Carolin Denz – Director, Noted Fellowship)

 

 

Ben Corrigan’s podcast is unique in the classical music market. Not only does he invite composers to talk about their new works and discuss their opinions on the classical music industry, but he joins them in composing a completely new piece of music “off the cuff” at the end of each episode.

Corrigan does everything himself – from the conceptual design of the individual podcasts to the recording and technical implementation. His goal is to complete the first podcast series excuse the mess by the end of 2018 and to publish an album with the newly created compositions.

The podcast is currently in development and within the next year, with the support, help and input of selected mentors from Noted Fellowship, Corrigan will further develop his podcast and music album in terms of content and structure. Furthermore, he will receive a financial support from Noted of 5,000€.

Get more information here, or better yet – listen directly to his podcast here!

(Written on April 10, 2018 )

The first podcast from Noted has been released, following the Noted Roundtable on Inclusion and Diversity.

Noted Round-ups are short podcasts that follow the Noted Roundtables – an international series which looks to bring about change in the performing arts industry through discussion and implementation. Through Noted, we want to generate new solutions to industry problems, not just with our own industry members and artists, but with brand leaders from different fields, and also—most importantly—the audience! The Roundtables bring together this unique combination of stakeholders on an equal footing.

The very first Noted Round-ups episode is a discussion on what was originally “diversity”, but now referred to as “inclusivity”. Here we discuss minorities in the performing arts industry, focusing on those backstage (not on stage), covering race, gender, background, and more.

We came out of this session with the following action points:

  • When recruiting, be more explicit about what we don’t want or need (e.g. an arts degree), and present the image of our ideal candidate in the advertising
  • Either ensure that job titles clearly state what the position is, or make them more sexy and fun
  • Create inclusive communities in the performing arts administrative sector, spanning across both audiences and potential employees
  • Showcase the exciting elements of our industry, through podcasts, videos, partnerships with mainstream brands
  • Shake up internal systems – reverse mentoring, creative sessions led by interns, engage more with outside the industry

This episode is hosted by Kathleen Alder and Olivia Brown, produced and edited by Olivia.

Listen on all your favourite platforms now!

(Written on March 27, 2018 )

Guardian

The Simón Bolívar Orchestra – why we should look beyond the music

Reviews of El Sistema’s flagship orchestra’s London concerts missed the bigger picture, writes Geoff Baker.

Classic FM

Exclusive: Gustavo Dudamel answers your questions

We spoke exclusively to hotshot Venezuelan conductor Gustavo Dudamel ahead of the release of his new Wagner recording with the Simon Bolivar Symphony Orchestra, and he found time to answer some of your questions too.

The Stage

Performing arts contributes £5.4 billion a year to UK economy

The music, performing and visual arts sector, which includes theatre, is now worth £5.4 billion a year to the UK economy, new figures from the Department for Culture, Media and Sport have revealed.

International Arts Manager

New fellowship to support emerging arts admin talent

Boutique classical and contemporary music marketing agency WildKat PR has announced the launch of The Noted Innovation Fellowship, a scheme that will introduce industry newcomers to leading arts mangers in order to progress their careers.

Classical Music Magazine

Warwick Thompson: Has the Dane brought something rotten to the state of Covent Garden?

After a slew of suboptimal stagings at the Royal Opera, it seems a good time to mull over the artistic direction of the house under Kasper Holten, who took up his post in 2011.

Zeit Online

Hört doch endlich auf zu jammern

Ja, die Klassikbranche hat nicht mehr so viel Geld wie früher. Dennoch kein Grund zur Resignation: Das Publikum verjüngt sich, und die Musiker sind vielseitiger denn je.

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung

Rap in der Philharmonie

Die neue Pariser Philharmonie wurde beschlossen, als noch niemand an Haushalsdefizite dachte. Nun tobt in Paris ein Kultur- und Klassenkampf um das neue und das alte Konzerthaus: Kostenüberschreitung, weite Anfahrtswege, Programmdiktat.

Spiegel Online

Deutscher ESC-Vorentscheid: Mit Harfe und Dudelsack nach Wien

Von Mittelalterklängen bis Elektropop: Der NDR hat sieben Kandidaten für den ESC-Vorentschied bekannt gegeben.

Klassik.com

Oper Leipzig legt positive Bilanz vor

Die Oper Leipzig befindet sich laut eigenen Angaben hinsichtlicher der Zuschauernachfrage auf einem erfolgreichen Weg.

The New York Times

A Concert Hall in Paris Aims to Bridge Divides

PARIS — The new concert hall here, the Philharmonie de Paris, rises like a flight of doves, its sprawling waves of concrete and steel designed by the star architect Jean Nouvel to symbolize the end of the “eternal ostracism” of the struggling neighborhoods nearby.

Twitter

Icons of Europe ‏@IconsEurope: Great @WeAreNoted @WildKatPR concept! Could off-stage leadership and fresh thinking be built thru Chair at an institution? #NotedFellowship

Classic FM @ClassicFM: The glamour, glitz and high notes of being a soprano all comes at a price http://classfm.co/o3QUer 

London Symphony Orch ‏@londonsymphony: Good wishes to the new @philharmonie in Paris which opens tonight. Looks fabulous, can’t wait to play there in Feb.

834ea8b1-19ef-4a6b-b06c-34a3a7486742-620x372Gustavo Dudamel conducting the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra at the Southbank Centre, January 2015. Photo: Nohely Oliveros/SBC

(Written on January 14, 2015 )

The Guardian

BBC promises ‘strongest commitment to the arts in a generation’

New season will see extra £3m spent on productions of Shakespeare and live broadcasts from Glyndebourne and Hay.

BBC Music Magazine

Chetham’s School of Music announces plans for new concert hall

The school has received funding to build a world-class concert hall in Manchester’s city centre.

Classic FM News

Yoshiki plays piano battle with hologram of himself

Japanese rock star and classical crossover artist Yoshiki has surprised audiences at the annual SXSW music conference by playing a piano duet with a hologram version of himself.

Lost London Underground violin sparks social media campaign

A performer lost her violin ‘in a daze’ on the London Underground and is relying on the kindness of strangers for its safe return.

Lang Lang launches new app challenge with €30k prize

Pianist Lang Lang has created a competition to find the best digital application to encourage learning and discovery of classical music, with a prize of €30,000 for the winning entry.

The New York Times

Minnesota Orchestra Conductor Returns … For Now

Osmo Vänska, who resigned as its music director in October, makes a triumphant return to the newly renovated Orchestra Hall. But if any kind of resolution in the matter of artistic leadership is imminent, no one is yet willing to discuss it.

Paris Match

A 70 ans: Gérard Mortier, mort du roi de l’opéra

Le Belge, qui a dirigé certains des plus grands opéras de la planète, a marqué par son audace.

Il Messaggero

Arriva in Italia “La famiglia Addams”, Elio e Geppi Cucciari calcheranno la scena

La famiglia Addams si trasferisce in Italia. Zio Fester e tutti gli altri personaggi creati negli anni Trenta dal genio del disegnatore statunitense Charles Addams, infatti, saranno protagonisti di una commedia musicale che andrà in scena in molti teatri della Penisola a partire dal prossimo ottobre.

Das Orchester

François-Xavier Roth neuer GMD in Köln

François-Xavier Roth wird Generalmusikdirektor in Köln. Der Dirigent tritt sein Amt am 1. September 2015 für fünf Jahre an.

Classical music on Twitter

International Piano: @IP_mag ‘More than half the pianists I heard in three months used printed music’ writes our US correspondent. Is memorisation out of fashion?

Brooklyn Rider: ‏@Brooklyn_Rider We are thrilled to launch our Kickstarter campaign for the Brooklyn Rider Almanac! Check it out and please share! http://bit.ly/BRAlmanac

Scottish Chamber Orchestra: @SCOmusic We launch our 2014/15 Season today! New brochures are available to view on our website http://bit.ly/1jwlPng  tell us what you think!

Noted:@WeAreNoted If you missed out on a ticket tonight, look out for our blog tomorrow morning of a rundown of tonight’s talk 🙂 #notedtalks #socialmedia

yoshiki-hologram-1395836867-article-0

(Written on March 27, 2014 )

Marc Shelkin
The Social Shop

Kathleen Alder
WildKat PR

Katy Howell
Immediate Future

Last night’s Noted event hosted by WildKat PR and Sane & Able took a creative look at the world of social media, with three professionals from the industry. These speakers were Marc Shelkin – founding director of The Social Shop – Kathleen Alder – founding director of WildKat PR – and Katy Howell – CEO of Immediate Future.

As with previous Noted events, last night the WildKat PR and Sane & Able offices were full of people from a variety of professions, students and enterprising individuals hoping to learn from the experience of the speakers and meet like-minded people. This event was particularly helpful to those aspiring to or already working in social media – whether they were managing the social media for a company, a charity, an artist or another individual. The speakers shared their experience of leading social media and communications agencies and gave advice relevant to people just beginning to use social media and those already seasoned in the area.

All of the speakers agreed that the results of social media can be long term and difficult to monitor. For businesses, good social media does not necessarily translate into monetary value, at least not in an immediate sense. The behaviour pattern of using different sources before making a purchase decision and the increasing rarity of a ‘direct sale’ was discussed – with Katy Howell providing the example of discovering a book in a high street book shop, reading the reviews online and then buying it for her kindle. Given that this is typical of this day and age, the speakers agreed that it is vital for brands to embed their social media into their sales system to help ensure that consumers turn to them when it is time to make a purchase. Kathleen Adler described a problem with integration of social media into classical music PR campaigns – the classical music industry tends to regard a social media campaign as a separate entity to a press or ticket sales campaign and artists could do with embedding their social media as much as brands and businesses.

There was a discussion about how social media has changed over time. Smart phones have had a tremendous impact on patterns of posting and have helped to make social media truly 24/7. The profile of social media users has widened – with the number of users aged 40 to 65 increasing faster than any other age bracket. Katy Howell and Marc Shelkin disagreed about the future of social media: Marc believes that social media does not have a long lifespan as it currently stands whereas Katy thinks that although the platforms of social media may change, social media won’t disappear at all as we have fundamentally changed as people because of it.

There was an interesting audience-lead discussion on individuals, such as celebrities, who do not want to promote themselves on social media but take negative content concerning them off social media. There was a consensus that it is very difficult to control what is said about an individual on social media, but the law is catching up, in terms of libel, concerning what people write on twitter. Katy Howell said that every individual’s priorities are different, but she suggests it is a good idea for celebrities to have a platform to respond to comments made on social media.

Take a look at the next events Noted events on their website.  You can follow Noted on twitter or like their facebook page for more information.Check back soon for a video blog from last night’s guests & speakers!

laughing
IMG_5955
full roomvideo blog board

(Written on March 27, 2014 )

John Sandall

Data Scientist – YPlan

Chris Sheldrick

Founder – what3words

Jack Waley-Cohen

Co-founder – what3words

Last night’s Noted event hosted by WildKat PR and Sane & Able took a creative look at the world of apps and app building, with three professionals from the industry. These speakers included John Sandall – Data Scientist at YPlan – Chris Sheldrick – Founder of what3words – and Jake Waley-Cohen – Co-founder of what3words.

As with previous Noted events, last night the WildKat PR and Sane & Able offices were full to the brim with people from a variety of professions, students and enterprising individuals hoping to learn from the experience of the speakers and meet like-minded people. This event was particularly helpful for those who were interested in building an app, or those with questions about whether an app would be right for their business or idea. The speakers provided helpful and realistic advice and encouragement about what it is like to start, maintain and maintain success with an app as well as insider advice and tips.

When considering the preparations necessary to create a successful app, Jack Waley-Cohen of what3words emphasised the importance of planning: “If you seem to be running low on money (ie 6 months or less) then it will be much harder to get investment – make sure you plan.” Although financial backing is practically very important Chris Sheldrick added how people, team and ideas are also crucial: “If people get your idea quickly as well as being enthusiastic about it, they’re good to get on board with your team.” Given what the professionals from what3words said last night, not only is planning important but certainty of ideas and gaining support for the overall app is also imperative for success, including support found in people close to home: Chris mentioned that great additions to their team were found in people who were recommended or even friends of friends.

For fine tuning app ideas and businesses, YPlan’s John Sandall gave some great advice in stating the importance of focusing on quality not quantity. To really get an app going he said “Your idea HAS to be real and viable”. Jack Waley-Cohen added that getting an outside perspective from an industry professional is a good way to go about doing this: “To find out whether your app idea is good, then talk further with developer and see what they offer for their involvement!” Also, although YPlan is now a great success, John mentioned that YPlan was actually the 50th idea the founders had come up with. Taking time to fine tune the right idea that will get the consumer interested is worth the deliberation before you take your app dreams any further.

A great question raised was: ‘In what way can you get your app out to market and interest from the masses?’ what3words offered that they used a big PR push, however as Chris said: “we initially just put it out there without marketing to make sure we had feedback first”. It seems important not to waste time but instead to get your idea out there in order to get a feel for how the app will be received by the consumer. This is a good start for finding areas and ideas to improve. YPlan’s John Sandall suggested a launch event where people are invited along with speakers talking about the app to get a buzz. In the early stages of launching an app, a concern raised was app ideas being ‘stolen’ and then copied and used by another company, however the speakers were in agreement that it is good to share your ideas to gain feedback. Also, in order to protect an app Chris of what3words explained that you can apply for a patent: “think of it as a buffer for a deterrent – by the time you get approved or not, your idea will be big enough…”  The IdeaSafe was also highly recommended, an online vault that protects your creativity and prevents idea theft.

The evening was an insightful success due to the excellent honest speakers; the atmosphere was alive with creative minds in discussion.

Take at look at our next event ‘Successful Social Media’ on Wednesday 26th March. The April Noted event ‘How To Rebrand’ has also been announced on Eventbrite.

Check out Noted via Twitter or Facebook for more quotes from the speakers and information about the event.

Check back soon for a video blog from last night’s guests!

5

Photos by Oliver Hyde-Tetley

(Written on February 27, 2014 )

Daisy Evans

Opera Director – Silent Opera

Jude Christian

Theatre Director

Dominic Dorin

Film Director – I Owe Youth

Last night’s Noted event hosted by WildKat PR and Sane & Able took an informative and engaging look at the world of Directing, with three professionals from the industry. These speakers included Daisy Evans – Opera Director at Silent Opera – Jude Christian – Freelance Theatre Director who has worked for the Royal Opera House Youth Opera Company and the National Theatre Studio – and Dominic Dorin – Film Director at I Owe Youth.

Discussion at the event was inspiring and helpful to people of a variety of professions that are linked into this area of the industry, ranging from those interested in Directing, to trained or aspiring actors/actresses, film producers and much more. The speakers described their differing beginnings in studying, experience and directing, and how they got to the level of success that they have reached at this stage of their careers. Daisy Evans of Silent Opera trained at the Royal Academy of Music as a singer but soon realised that she wanted to become a director, Dominic Dorin on I Owe Youth came from a background in design and found his way into film through a sound design internship and a directorship in fashion, and freelance director Jude Christian studied English at university where she started directing and then followed up this interest with a directing course at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London.

When asked about financing their dreams and ambitions, the topic of sponsorship was raised along with some helpful ‘dos and don’ts’. Daisy suggested that the Arts Council should not be the first go to for launching a business or production, funds such as sponsorship and bursarys can be imperative for realising directing dreams and generating the finance necessary create a successful production. Jude made the important point that: “when asking people for money, be specific about what it is for”, as you are not likely to be sponsored without having made your creative aims and budget clear. Daisy added that it is important not to “think about sponsorship as money” and instead consider what resources might be useful to you such as the hiring of stage equipment or batteries. Dominic described how using creative ideas and presenting them practically can help the sponsorship process: “To help get sponsors we create beautiful story boards to help us get people on the same page visually”. It’s industry savvy thinking such as this that has aided all three of these young and successful professionals.

How do you as a Director encourage everyone involved to give their interpretation, but also retain the authority to make the final decisions? Ultimately, it seems that the actor/actress has the last say in what happens on ‘the night’ of a production in both theatre and opera as Jude pointed out in an amused tone. She made the quite practical point that as a Director you need to make it your business to get all those involved in a production on board with your aims and vision. However there is a manner in which to do this which is loaded with respect, patience and understanding amongst your ultimate authority. Dominic described how: “When you’re on set the director’s decision should be respected, but the director shouldn’t abuse that position.” The speakers agreed that is important to be authoritative, but ultimately you have to earn the respect and trust of those you are working with and the company at large.

One answer that is only born from a career of learning from success and mistakes is to the question: ‘If you could go back in time. What advice would you give yourself?’ Interestingly a variety of answers arose. A good piece of advice for those still studying came from Dominic who said that he would tell himself: “not to waste time. While you’re at uni, do as much as possible and start making decisions.” Where attitude and approach is concerned Daisy described how pacing yourself is important – be driven but try not to do everything all at once. Jude mentioned how a calm approach helps: “When I came to London I just said yes to everything. I’d definitely tell my past-self to chill out.”

The evening was not just an informative success due to the talk and excellent speakers, but the WildKat PR and Sane & Able offices were a buzz with enthusiastic arts and business individuals who have a passion for the industry and a hunger to learn more.

Take at look at our next event ‘Building your App’ on Wednesday 26th February. The Noted March event on Successful Social Media has also been announced on Eventbrite.

Check out Noted via Twitter or Facebook for more quotes from the speakers and information about the event.

Check back soon for a video blog from last night’s guests!

IMG_4761

(Written on January 23, 2014 )

At last week’s Noted event ‘Music and Advertising,’ we had a chat with two of our fantastic speakers; composer Jeremy Holland-Smith and Imagem group president Natasha Baldwin. They discussed their careers and provided valuable insights for anyone who is aspiring to work in the advertising, music and sync industries. The following videos are an insider’s look into the world of music and advertising from both a creative and business perspective.

For more information, take a look at Noted’s website, facebook and twitter

(Written on November 25, 2013 )

In our second ‘Noted Talks’ event ‘Publishing Across Genres,’ our speakers raised many issues on the effect of new technology on the publishing industry. Kindles, Spotify and internet downloading; literature and music publishing will have to find ways to adapt to these technologies. We asked our guests whether they preferred digital or traditional books and music, check out our video blog to find out what they said!

(Written on September 17, 2013 )

Janis Susskind

Managing Director of Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishing

David McGinnis

Media and Music Manager at Mute Song

Martine Halban

Co-Founder and Director of Halban Publishers for books

Last night’s Noted Talk ‘Publishing Across Genres’ was a captivating event hosted by WildKatPR and Sane & Able. The evening featured three animated experts: Janis Susskind, David McGinnis and Martine Halban, who spoke on their knowledge and experience in Publishing. Throughout the evening, the speakers talked on the role of publishing in the worlds of music and the written word. They also contributed top advice in the area of self-publishing, which was applicable in a variety of ways for the eager attendees.

Many perspectives across the topics covered were highly valuable as light was shed on everything from how our speakers select what to publish, to the affect of new technologies on the industry. The importance of understanding the business was emphasised by Janis Susskind who explained the behind the scenes grass roots provisions needed for success: “For a year I typed index cards and memorized names, and learned the business from the ground up.” David McGinnis highlighted the validity of a gradual rise to the top: “Play some gigs, have some fans. Get some people throwing their underwear at you. Don’t go straight to sync”.

Martine Halban commented on the changes that the industry has undergone in the last twenty or so years: “In the 90s, Amazon started and the whole publishing scene changed. Now we are in the era of e-book publishing”. Interestingly, what arose is that it seems advanced technology has not merely removed older formats for accessing and listening to music, but more the emphasis has changed for these tools. Janis Susskind illustrates this: “I see more CDs being sold at classical venues. At the beginning we could never get a record company to agree to this”. David McGinnis took this one step further by explaining the potential value of CDs: “The physical disc might become like a piece of novelty merchandise”.

The entire evening was an eye opener into music publishing from professionals who were able to divulge valuable advice. It was an atmospheric evening full to the brim with young professionals and keen students, and the experience was both stimulating and informative with a good insight into the future of music publishing.

Take at look at our next event which will take place on Wednesday October 23rd ‘Noted Talks…Music Money Matters’. You can find this via the noted Event Bright.

Check out Noted via Twitter or Facebook for more quotes from the speakers and information about the event.

Check back soon for a video blog from last night’s guests!

1

2

3

4

5

6

Oliver Hyde-Tetley

Oliver Hyde-Tetley

(Written on September 12, 2013 )