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In today’s news: Tory MP Bernard Jenkin urges visa deal for EU musicians, possible improvement on school results by extra music lessons, and the hearing and visually impaired to get captions through smart glasses in National Theatre trial. Composer Klaus Huber has died, successful 31st edition of music festival “Niedersächsische Musiktage”, and Berlin State Opera is officially re-opened.

BBC News

New music ‘at risk’ through music education ‘neglect’ in England

The success of British music is at risk because the subject is being neglected in schools, says the head of UK Music.

Tory MP Bernard Jenkin urges visa deal for EU musicians

Eurosceptic Conservative MP Bernard Jenkin has urged the UK government to guarantee free movement for top EU musicians after Brexit.

The Guardian

How to improve the school results: not extra maths but music, loads of it

A Bradford primary school wants the world to know its newfound Sats success is down to giving all children up to six hours of music a week.

Musical Instrument Professional

‘Every child has a right to music education’ – ISM launches Primary Music Toolkit

The ISM Trust, supported by the Schools Music Association (SMA), has commissioned the Primary Music Toolkit to help primary school teachers further their self-assurance in teaching music in the classroom.

The Times

Deaf to get captions through smart glasses in National Theatre trial

Smart glasses are being tried out by the National Theatre in an attempt to make performances accessible to the hearing and visually impaired.

Limelight

Nominations for the 2017 ARIA Fine Arts Awards announced

Slava Grigoryan and ABC Music’s labels dominate the nominations, while a Kate Miller-Heidke inclusion raises eyebrows.

Pizzicato

Three French orchestras collaborate for the employment of an assistant conductor

Three French orchestras, Orchestre de Picardie, Orchestre National d’Île-de-France and Orchestre National de Lille have signed a partnership for the common employment of an assistant conductor.

Zeit Online

Komponist Klaus Huber gestorben

Klaus Huber war einer der letzten Großen der modernen Zwölftonmusik. Jetzt ist der Schweizer Komponist, Dirigent und Geiger mit 92 Jahren in Perugia gestorben.

Klassik Heute

31. Niedersächsische Musiktage erfolgreich abgeschlossen

Die 31. Niedersächsischen Musiktage beschäftigten sich vom 2. September bis 1. Oktober 2017 mit dem Thema „Raum“.

KlassikInfo.de

Wiedereröffnung der Berliner Staatsoper

Wiedereröffnung der Staatsoper Unter den Linden am Tag der Deutschen Einheit mit der Premiere von »Zum Augenblicke sagen: Verweile doch!« mit Robert Schumanns »Szenen aus Goethes Faust« unter der musikalischen Leitung von Generalmusikdirektor Daniel Barenboim und in der Regie von Intendant Jürgen Flimm.

Twitter

3sat Kulturzeit @kulturzeit

Dirigent Kent Nagano und Intendant Georges Delnon bleiben bis 2025 an der :

Klaus Huber © Charlotte Oswald/dpa

 

Merken

Merken

Merken

Merken

(Written on October 4, 2017 )

Everyone listens to music. We can surely all agree that music is a big part of our lives, whether that be listening to the radio or a Spotify playlist on the way to work, letting our hair down in a nightclub on a Friday night, or watching a visiting orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall, music is something that everyone can relate to. So why are researchers warning of the extinction of music in secondary schools in England?

The government introduced the English Baccalaureate (EBacc) in 2010, with a goal to increase the take-up of ‘core’ academic subjects like mathematics and science. This move, however, has left the arts lagging behind. The Ebacc does leave space for students to take arts subjects and there is no solid evidence that the new syllabus has affected GCSE arts subject entries. However, in the New Schools Network report on the EBacc and the arts, it has been found that ‘schools have misunderstood the intention behind the EBacc, using its introduction to reduce funding for the teaching of the arts.’ This has therefore led to a decline in the number of qualified arts teachers, correlating with declining figures on music teacher PGCE courses.

The music industry contributes £3.5 billion to the economy, and it is well known that arts education improves job prospects by making young people more creative, tolerant and broad-minded. It is therefore strange that it is not taken as seriously as one of the ‘core subjects’ that the government view as most important to a child’s education. Catherine McKinnell stated in debates on arts subject inclusion and petition in February 2016: ‘I feel that the Government’s policy and approach at the moment fundamentally risks undermining the benefits that can come from that experience… at the most fundamental level, we need these skills for our economy. If we put off children and young people who can flourish in those areas even though they may struggle in some other ones, the evidence shows that that would be a worrying trend.’

Photograph: Newsteam

Not only does music enrich the economy, but it is also good for you. A study from the University of London’s Institute of Education ‘found that exposing children to classical music can aid in developing better concentration levels, self-discipline and social skills.’ Music is both valuable for the economy and for the individual and in Finland, teaching music and learning to play an instrument is the norm. It is, as stated by Stephen Moss in his article, Why not put music at the heart of education?, ‘the foundation of  children’s schooling (in Finland); it should be the model for us to follow.’

So what are we waiting for?

(Written on August 17, 2017 )

Classical News

In our news today, schools are pushing classical music to the margins, Gramophone reports, Sir Nicholas Serota has been offered a role as Chairman of the Arts Council, and a rotating group of musicians bring classical music to the club scene. Also, dutch violinists Martin Norgaard and Tim Kliphuis believe that all string players should learn how to improvise.

Gramophone

Why are our schools pushing classical music to the margins?

Growing within our schools today is a disturbing trend; increasingly, music is viewed as an optional subject – something equivalent to a passion that merely runs parallel to ‘academic’ subjects – that leads to contempt for classical music borne out of an ignorance of all it contains.

Classical Music Magazine

Sir Nicholas Serota tipped as next Arts Council chairman

Sir Nicholas Serota, director of the Tate Galleries, has been offered a role as Chairman of the Arts Council, the Times has reported. After 28 years running the Tate, Serota is reportedly considering whether to accept the new job, offered by the Department of Culture, Media and Sport.

New York Times

Bringing Classical Music to the Club Scene

Welcome to The Night Shift, a regular feature of London’s music scene. A rotating group of musicians from the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, the resident orchestra at the Southbank Center in London, stages these events on the last Tuesday of each month in a different pub.

The Telegraph

Bobby Hutcherson, jazz vibraphonist – obituary

Bobby Hutcherson, who has died aged 75, was one of the finest players of the vibraphone in jazz; his distinctive style combined brilliant technique with a bold imagination and great delicacy of expression.

The Strad

Should all string players learn how to improvise?

Dutch violinists Martin Norgaard and Tim Kliphuis believe teaching children improvisation and alternative styles of music should be a requirement of string lessons in the 21st century.

WQXR

ICE Members Compete in ‘Stupid Musician Tricks’

Musicians from the International Contemporary Ensemble strove to find out who among them possessed superlative skills. Called “Stupid Musician Tricks,” or “the biggest dork fest imaginable” according to some of ICE’s members,  the competition featured three categories.

nmz

Musikfest Berlin: Hollywood-Klänge und neuer Philharmoniker-Chef

Filmmusik aus Hollywood, ein Riesenwerk des Komponisten Wolfgang Rihm und der Auftritt des künftigen Chefs der Berliner Philharmoniker: Zum Musikfest Berlin treten vom 2. bis 20. September rund 20 Orchester zu fast 30 Konzerten auf.

Musik heute

Geiger Arzberger ab Ende August in München

Der Leipziger Geiger Stefan Arzberger wird ab Ende August ein Engagement in München antreten. Näheres wolle er dazu noch nicht mitteilen. Zunächst wolle er sich jedoch bei der amerikanischen Botschaft in Berlin darum bemühen, wieder ein Visum für die USA zu bekommen. Er ist dort mit einer zehnjährigen Einreisesperre belegt.

klassik.com

Tickets für Bayreuth? Kein Problem (mehr)!

Die diesjährigen Bayreuther Richard-Wagner-Festspiele konnten nicht alle Veranstaltungskarten verkaufen. Laut Aussage des Geschäftsführers Holger von Berg belaufe sich die Zahl der nicht veräußerten Karten allerdings auf unter 40.

Twitter

BBC Radio 3 @BBCRadio3 Start your Wednesday with a massive brassy bang and the Balkan brilliance of

Classic FM @ClassicFM An extraordinary one-woman opera, with , is on at – find out more here:

nmz @musikzeitung Till Brönner: „Trump hätte wohl kein -Ständchen verdient“: Jazz ist Nischen- und…

24iht-rfrcclubbing-1-master768

Welcome to The Night Shift, a regular feature of London’s music scene. Credit: Joe Plommer

(Written on August 24, 2016 )

Classical News

In today’s news, the Classical 100 launches across the UK, Audiences Europe Network considers rethinking it’s future and Stagescreen Global announces a new musical venture. Also, Indian classical music guru Ustad Abdul Rashid Khan dies at 107

Classic FM

Classical 100: now every child in the UK can have access to some of the greatest music ever written

Following its success in English schools, the Classical 100, a partnership between Classic FM, the ABRSM and Decca Classics, is launching across the UK. Here’s the low-down

Arts Professional

Audiences Europe Network to rethink it’s future

After a failed bid to the Creative Europe programme and the end of a previous strand of European funding, network organisers are considering scaling back activities

Classical Music Magazine

Stagescreen Global announces new musical venture

Stagescreen Global, a transatlantic alliance of digital pioneers and Broadway theatre producers, is aiming to take event cinema to a new level by bringing relays of musicals to picture theatres, tablet computers and smartphones

The Times of India

Classical music guru Ustad Abdul Rashid Khan dies at 107

The grand old guru of Indian classical music, Ustad Abdul Rashid Khan, breathed his last in Kolkata on Thursday

Der Tagesspiegel

Das todernste Spiel

Magische Gesten, flüchtige Konstellationen: Zum 90. Geburtstag des ungarischen Komponisten György Kurtág

NMZ

Anhaltisches Theater feiert 250 Jahre Anhaltische Philharmonie

Das Anhaltische Theater Dessau stellt seine nächste Spielzeit in das Zeichen von 250 Jahren Anhaltische Philharmonie Dessau

Klassikakzente

Film ab: Rolando Villazón kürt den talentiertesten Musikvideokünstler

Nachdem Anfang Oktober Rolando Villazóns neues Album “Treasures of Bel Canto” erschienen ist, hat sich die Deutsche Grammophon mit dem Sänger auf die Suche nach einem talentierten Filmemacher für ein Musikvideo gemacht

Arizona Public Media

José Luis Gomez Named Tucson Symphony’s Music Director

The Tucson Symphony Orchestra announced the appointment of its 17th music director to thunderous applause Wednesday.

The Economist

Where have all the young Italian opera singers gone?

In January the Royal Opera House announced the new slate of Jette Parker artists. With its five year-long positions, the Jette Parker Young Artist programme is a sought-after destination among emerging opera stars

Twitter

 Mashable ‏@mashable  Adele wasn’t as chill as we thought about her Grammys performance: http://on.mash.to/1Ttioi9 

Moritz Eggert ‏@MoritzEggert  Wer die NMZ nicht hat, kann hier meinen letzten Artikel über den Kompositionsunterricht nachlesen: http://www.nmz.de/artikel/komponieren-ist-handwerk …

Bristol Plays Music ‏@BPMbristol   Know a young musician or singer aged 13-17 with a love of jazz? Join our free @Tom_Warriors workshop @Colston_Hall! http://www.colstonhall.org/shows/jazz-experience …

Classical 100/ Classic FM

Classical 100/ Classic FM

 

(Written on February 19, 2016 )

We are now in #Vlogtober so throughout the month we will be posting interesting videos as well as creating some of our own.

Take a look at this video about Opera North’s work at a school in Leeds where they have helped improve children’s ability in English and Maths by giving free music lessons.

Keep an eye out on this page tomorrow for the second video of #Vlogtober!

BBC Look North (Yorkshire)

(Written on October 1, 2015 )

Classical News

In today’s news Clemens Trautmann has been appointed as the new president of Deutsche Grammophon. BBC Music have launched the Ten Pieces Secondary film, with presenters including James May and Pixie Lott. Also, Yo-Yo Ma has won a prestigious award given by the Academy of Music for his promotion of the works of Dvořák.

Classic FM

Yo-Yo Ma wins top Czech music prize

Cellist honoured for his promotion of the works of Dvořák

Classical Music Magazine

Clemens Trautmann appointed president of Deutsche Grammophon

Senior media executive and award-winning Juilliard scholar Clemens Trautmann is to take over operational management of the classical label.

Classical Source

BBC Music Launch Ten Pieces Secondary Film

BBC Music has today announced the presenters for its brand new Ten Pieces Secondary film, which will launch for schools in cinemas across the UK in October.

Arts Professional

Jeremy Corbyn plans to reverse arts funding cuts

The Labour leadership candidate has outlined his national strategy for the arts, which includes reversing arts cuts, introducing minimum fees for performances and exhibitions and setting up a cabinet committee on the arts.

The Spectator

Orchestral conductors would be much better if they tried performing Renaissance music

Peter Phillips on his not entirely successful attempts to persuade orchestral conductors to take on the great choral masterpieces of the Renaissance

Der Tagesspiegel

Musikfest Berlin: Wolfgang Rihm im Interview “Schönberg knirscht vor Kraft und Gegenwart”

Ein Gespräch mit dem Komponisten Wolfgang Rihm über Arnold Schönberg, zeitlose Klassiker und das Sinnliche in der Musik.

Die Welt

Auschwitz-Prozess mit Streichquartett

Der Komponist Frederic Rzewski ist ein noch zu entdeckender Unbequemer der Moderne. Sein Kammermusiktheater “Der Triumph des Todes” erlebte beim Kunstfest Weimar seine deutsche Erstaufführung.

Musik heute

Barenboim erfreut über Publikumszuspruch – Plädoyer für moderne Musik – Musikfest Berlin beginnt

Der argentinisch-israelische Dirigent und Pianist Daniel Barenboim (72) freut sich über das “wunderbare Geschenk”, dass seine Konzerte noch immer besucht werden. “Man könnte denken, dass nach 65 Jahren das Publikum sagt: ‘Es reicht, warum sollen wir noch einmal kommen, das habe ich schon gehört, lass uns etwas Neues hören.’

France Musique

Zubin Mehta s’émeut du sort des réfugiés en Europe

Le chef d’orchestre indien Zubin Mehta fustige les leaders occidentaux pour leur absence de réaction concrète. Le maestro  se dit très touché par le sort de ces millions de réfugiés fuyant la  Syrie et l’Irak.

The New York Times

The National Music Museum, an Unlikely Eden in South Dakota

As you walk toward the cello believed to be the oldest in the world, the nearly 500-year-old instrument has its back turned to you. But the discourtesy grows forgivable on approach: The Amati “King” cello’s rear side is its most seductive feature, with richly colored paintings — crowns, winged putti, columns, fleurs-de-lis, Justice hoisting a sword — that take on glowing depth beneath the varnish.

Twitter

The Royal Opera : Es Devlin, the designer who works with , and… us ^E

BBC Press Office: . launches Secondary film with presenters incl &

Classical Music: . director on the city’s need for a new medium-sized concert hall (via ):

Kunstfest-Weimar-2015-6-

An opera about Auschwitz… Kunstfest Weimar welcomes Frederic Rzewski’s disturbing work. Photo: Nationaltheater Weimar/© Candy Welz

(Written on September 3, 2015 )

Classical News

In today’s news, Rhodri Marsden investigates the story behind Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture cannon whilst the Telegraph argues that, apart from the disco night, the BBC Proms are rather tame this year: exactly what it needs. Sinfini also gives a run down of what the parties are promising for the arts in the General Election. Elsewhere, 2Cellos have had to cancel their tour to the US due to Stjepan Hauser’s neck injury. Also in The StradViolinist Roland Glassl is leaving the Mandelring Quartet after 16 years. Andreas Willwhol, the former principal of the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra will succeed him.

The Independent

Rhodri Marsden’s Interesting Objects: The 1812 Overture cannon

Tchaikovsky’s lack of enthusiasm for his commission prompted the bloody-minded inclusion of a huge brass band, a carillon and, of course, the cannon

The Telegraph

A run-of-the mill Proms is just what we need

Notwithstanding its disco night, there’s nothing to frighten the horses in this season’s programme

The Strad

2Cellos cancel US tour due to injury

Stjepan Hauser of the cello duo has damaged his neck, according to a statement

Violist Roland Glassl to depart Mandelring Quartet after 16 years

His replacement is Andreas Willwohl, former principal violist of the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra

Sinfini

Election 2015 A vote for the arts

The value of the UK arts sector increased ten per cent between 2012 and 2013, and the creative industries are now estimated to be worth nearly £77bn to the UK economy.

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung

Deutsche Sänger räumen in London ab

Zwei Deutsche sind bei den Opera Awards als beste Sänger ausgezeichnet worden. Weder Anja Harteros noch Christina Gerhaher konnten den Preis persönlich entgegennehmen.

Berliner Zeitung

Wird Andris Nelsons Simon Rattles Nachfolger?

Andris Nelsons ist einer der aussichtsreichsten Kandidaten für die Nachfolge von Simon Rattle.

klassik.com

Auszeichnung im Rahmen des Kulturfestivals Euriade

Martin-Buber-Plakette für Thomas Quasthoff

El País

El pequeño  arte de pedir dinero

El triunfo del ‘crowdfunding’ demuestra la fascinación de nuestra cultura por lo mínimo al tiempo que revela cambios profundos en los modelos de negocio tradicionales

The New York Times

Peter Eotvos prepares the opera ‘Senze Sangue‘

Peter Eotvos, the man on the aisle, composed ‚Senza Sangue‘, which will receive its concert premiere on May 1 in Cologne, Germany.

Twitter

The Federation ‏@Creative_Fed: Schools should not be ofsted outstanding without arts + creative engagement says @HarrietHarman #chArter – about diversity and equal access

Culture Republic ‏@culture_public : Over £500k of #economicimpact for Scotland generated every day by #Edinburgh cultural venues http://bit.ly/1Ie4h9I 

The Royal Opera ‏@TheRoyalOpera : A busy week ahead @RoyalOperaHouse – kicking things off with #ROHroger on stage in rehearsal – it opens on Friday! ^C

2CELLOS-electric-cellossuits-1280 News 27th April 2Cellos. Photo: kyso.org

 

(Written on April 27, 2015 )

Radio 4’s Front Row hosted a very interesting debate yesterday morning addressing questions such as: are artists owed a living by the state? What is the place of art in our lives? Is culture always a middle class luxury? And, do politicians ever take culture seriously? Hull’s Truck Theatre was the location, a suitable choice seeing as it is the 2017 City of Culture, and the panel was made up of a variety of different voices which ensured a lively debate: playwright Richard Bean, economist Philip Booth, sociologist Dr Tiffany Jenkins and dancer Deborah Bull, amongst others and audience interjections.

Throughout the programme, the discussion returned to the idea of what the purpose of arts and culture is. The case was made that the arts are beneficial to people both health-wise and in society whilst also attracting economic benefits. Of the nearly £4 billion of public money spent on culture every year, this puts £77 billion back into the economy. Equally, Rosie, the representative from the City of Culture scheme argued that through it, 1,300 more jobs in Hull would be created and attract big business. Economist Philip Booth contested this point saying that whilst there had been no research into the relationship between investment and culture, there had been such investigations into sport and this had shown that there is no connection between sport and the level of economic investment.

Moving past the economic arguments, cultural commentator Ekow Eshun argued that the point of the arts was not to please everyone but rather to prompt people to ask questions about life, existence and to challenge themselves.

An interesting angle discussed was from a school’s perspective. Whose responsibility are the arts? Headteacher Kevin McCallion from Brooksbank School noted that the accountability measures that Ofsted and league tables set out do not include the arts: English, Maths and Science, understandably, are prioritized. The Warwick Commission’s recommendation that schools cannot be marked as ‘outstanding’ without evidence of the school providing an excellent cultural education would just render the arts another tick box for schools.

Despite all of these expert opinions, I think that one of the pupils in the audience, Emma, touched upon one of the most important purposes of the arts: ‘it builds me up as a person.’ Giving space to creativity and performance in schools develops self-confidence in young people and builds the skills needed for employment: giving presentations, talking to clients and being articulate are among many desirable qualities that are developed through the arts. Deborah Bull backed this up: many of today’s jobs are about creatively solving problems so cultivating creativity in schools, especially, will create better doctors, scientists, politicians…

Nodding to this year’s General Election, journalist Martin Bright, said that he was worried that we would have no department of culture at all after May; the arts have no political traction. Predictably, Philip Booth, believed that the state should not intervene in the arts and even went as far to say that Great Britain would be culturally richer if this was the case. To this, Deborah replied, that we would not necessarily be richer, the cultural landscape would just look different: we would see a lot more of the standard repertoire and much less of new, contemporary works.

The state certainly has a role to play in funding the arts; it would aid the continuation of new repertoire, and the arts are a large part of our national identity. However, with many sectors vying for money and claiming their area is beneficial and deserving of government money, it is also vital that any funds are also supported privately.

To the future government of the United Kingdom, please consider the arts in your budget. Aside from all the economic, health, social and employability arguments, quite simply, life would be boring without them.

You can catch up with the whole debate here.

UK City of Culture 2017

 

(Written on February 24, 2015 )

BBC News Wales

Horizons new music talent search launched by BBC Wales

A search for new musical talent with the promise of recording sessions and BBC airtime has been launched.

News Observer

Wake County schools to discuss new music partnership, technology and Read To Achieve

A new partnership with the music industry, the status of implementing the state’s Read To Achieve law and the district’s technology plan are scheduled to be on the agenda for the meeting of the Wake County school board’s student achievement committee.

The Vancouver Sun

Classical music is changing with the times

It used to be that a Jascha Heifetz or a Fritz Kreisler was known just for performing; today it seems the engaged artist has so many more different responsibilities and roles. When, and why, did it become necessary for an artist to consider these different demands?

Al.com

Classical music alive and well, Leon Botstein tells UAB music students; will conduct Alabama Symphony on Thursday

Birmingham, Alabama – Contrary to predictions of its early demise, classical music is not dead, or even dying.

Stuff

Apple pushes labels for iTunes exclusives

Apple has begun pressuring the major record companies to offer new releases exclusively through its iTunes store – a move that would initially block availability on streaming services such as Spotify or Beats Music, according to several people familiar with the matter.

Chicago Tribune

Ray Still, legendary CSO oboist and teacher remembered

Ray Still was famous for being the best of the best, one of the finest and longest-tenured orchestral oboe players of all time. He played oboe in the Chicago Symphony Orchestra for an astonishing 40 years, 39 of them as principal oboe. He served with distinction under four CSO music directors, from Fritz Reiner to Daniel Barenboim, until his retirement in 1993.

Detroit Free Press

Jazz artist Marcus Belgrave reunited with stolen trumpet, doesn’t have to pay pawnshop

Marcus Belgrave’s custom-made trumpet, which was stolen from the trunk of his car on Friday night in Eastern Market in Detroit, was recovered at Zeidman’s pawnshop, a few blocks east of the market area. The trumpeter picked up the horn at the downtown police station this afternoon, blowing a few choruses of “Oh Happy Day” for the assembled media as his wife, Joan, sang along.

Epoch Times

Jazz-Legende Thielemans beendet Karriere

Der belgische Jazz-Musiker Jean-Baptiste „Toots“ Thielemans beendet seine Karriere.

BBC News

BBC News

(Written on March 13, 2014 )

Buffalo News

Gerard Catalano: everybody knows some classical music

Why do we say we do not know classical music when it is everywhere in movies, television shows and commercials?

Global News

Katy Perry applauds Chinese orchestra’s version of ‘Roar’

Pop superstar Katy Perry was brought to tears Saturday by a unique rendition of her smash hit “Roar.”

GMA News

Italian violinist strikes a chord with street kids

A leading Italian violinist has swapped gilded concert halls for audiences of street children around the world, using music therapy to help those less fortunate

The Telegraph

Why opera directors must stop patronising people

Rupert Christiansen hopes that financial constraints might herald the end of directors who want to shock rather than entertain

Gramophone

The Menuhin Competition returns to London in 2016

Just five weeks ahead of the 2014 Menuhin Competition – the world’s most prestigious competition for violinists, taking place this year in Austin, Texas – plans were announced last night for the 2016 event, marking the centenary of Yehudi Menuhin’s birth

The Guardian

Arts head: Mark Tinkler, English Pocket Opera Company

The artistic director on opera as a learning tool and why schools, not hubs, need to be the main deliverer of music education

Classic FM Online

How I Wrote… Breaking Bad — Ozymandias – Sung Jin Hong

You know you’re addicted to Breaking Bad when you’re compelled to write an opera about it

Die Welt

Abbados Mozart-Orchester steht vor dem Aus

Der Traum des Star-Dirigenten ist zu Ende: Wegen finanzieller Schwierigkeiten und der Dauer-Krankheit des Dirigenten und Gründers musste das Orchestra Mozart “vorläufig” seine Aktivitäten einstellen

The Telegraph

The Telegraph

(Written on January 15, 2014 )