Posts Tagged ‘Tehran’
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In today’s news: Winners of 2017 BBC Proms Inspire Competition announced, and conductor Riccardo Muti to lead joint Italian and Iranian orchestral concerts. Final spurt at the construction site of the Staatsoper Berlin, and musicians at the G20 summit.

Music Teacher

Winners of 2017 BBC Proms Inspire Competition announced

Five young composers have won across three categories in this year’s competition. They will have their compositions performed at the BBC Prom in 2018, and they also win a broadcast on BBC Radio 3 and a bbc commission throughout the 17/18 season.

The Strad

Conductor Riccardo Muti to lead joint Italian and Iranian orchestral concerts

Celebrating 20 years of Muti’s ‘Roads of Friendship’ initiative, the performances by Italian and Iranian musicians take place in Tehran on 6 July and in Ravenna on 8 July

Cmuse

Saxophonist Floats Paper Inside Saxophone

Check out this cool trick by saxophonist and hobbyist, David Pope. He put a video of a piece of paper floating mid-air inside the bell of a saxophone.

Pizzicato

Denis Matsuev cancels concerts due to exhaustion

Under his doctor’s orders, Russian Pianist Denis Matsuev, 42, had to reduce his schedule due to exhaustion and therefore withdraw from several concerts during summer.

Berliner Morgenpost

Endspurt auf der Baustelle der Staatsoper Unter den Linden

In der Staatsoper Unter den Linden wird Optimismus verbreitet: Die Handwerker versichern, Ende Juli fertig zu sein.

NMZ

Dünne moralische Luft auf dem Gipfel

Orchestermusiker sind auch nur Bürger in Uniform, sie haben zu exerzieren, was man ihnen auf die Pulte stellt, was ein Regisseur ihnen vorinszeniert.

Klassik.com

Richard-Strauss-Festival 2017 zieht positive Bilanz

Das Richard-Strauss-Festival hat eine positive Bilanz der diesjährigen Festspielausgabe gezogen. Die binnen sieben Festivaltagen 25 ausgerichteten Veranstaltungen wurden von knapp 7.000 Zuschauern besucht.

BBC News

The sisters who have sung in the same church choir for 80 years

A pair of sisters have been singing in their church choir for more than 80 years.

Twitter

Music Teacher: BBC Proms

Merken

(Written on July 6, 2017 )

The last minute cancellation of a performance last week by the Tehran Symphony Orchestra at the World Wrestling Cup, infuriated its conductor Ali Rahbari. As the orchestra was about to play the national anthem, it was announced that women weren’t allowed to perform; Rahbari refused to perform if the orchestra could not play all together.  

Since the Islamic revolution in 1979, women have been forbidden from performing solo on stage. Outside the capital, performances are often cancelled if there is a female musician, even when tickets have been sold. To perform music in Iran, it is necessary to have a permit from the ministry of culture, however even with the permit, anti -music groups call off concerts; conservatives and some religious leaders claim music can “excite and cause deviation” among the country’s youth. Last week’s incident was the first time a performance by the Symphony Orchestra had been cancelled because of its female members.

Only this April, after a three year interlude, was the orchestra revived by Alexander Rahbari. According to Rahbari, this is thanks to Rouhani’s relatively moderate administration. Under the previous president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the orchestra was broken up, due to negligence and financial stringency.

Tehran Symphony Orchestra performs in Tehran in March after a 25 month break/ photo: Payvand Iran news

Tehran Symphony Orchestra performs in Tehran in March after a 25 month break/ photo: Payvand Iran news

It is odd that there are such gender issues in Iran’s entertainment industry. In many ways, the country is one of the more progressive middle Eastern countries; 70% of university graduates in Iran are women. The cancellation of concerts which have been permitted by the ministry of culture is considered wrong, and there doesn’t seem to be much clarity or consistency on the issue; Iranian law allows women to perform as part of an ensemble, however sometimes concerts go ahead and on some occasions they are called-off. Women aren’t allowed to sing solo either, as a result many are forced to go abroad in order to pursue careers in music. Are the restrictions on women performing just an extreme method of limiting music in Iran rather than restricting women? It seems that women in other industries aren’t discriminated against as severely, but according to some conservatives, music can “excite and cause deviation.”

The restrictions on the performance of music, the necessity of a permit and the cancellation of concerts because of female performers seem bizarre to Europe. Although females in the European music industry – most notably composers and conductors – do face gender issues, we have progressed considerably. This week, it was announced that Xian Zhang will be guest conductor at BBC National Orchestra of Wales. Although female conductors are still a rarity, the idea of women in this role is becoming normalised.

Conductor Ali Rahbari

Conductor Ali Rahbari

The human rights of women in Iran have been infringed upon; the orchestra was quite right not to perform rather than bow to the demands of the authorities, who prohibited the women from playing. Not only is it a kind of gender segregation, but audiences are deprived of music, which they have paid to hear. The head of the Wrestling Federation, Rasoul Khadem, has asked the orchestra to play the national anthem at another wrestling event in Tehran in January; let’s hope it goes ahead uninterrupted! 

(Written on December 4, 2015 )

In a fantastic article for International Arts Manager released today, Soosan Lolavar talks about the music, rehearsal process and travels behind her project Stay Close, an artistic exchange between Iran and the UK. The yearlong project will result in a new piece of music composed by Soosan that considers ethnic identity through the lens of the British-Iranian community.

Soosan Lolavar is a British-Iranian composer and sound artist. As part of the project, Soosan explored her own cultural heritage by travelling to Iran where she met with composers at Hermes Records, a Tehran-based record label. On returning to the UK, Soosan lead a series of workshops at the IYDA, (Iranian Youth Development Association), a community group for Iranian diaspora and migrant Farsi-speakers in South-East London.

You can find out more about Soosan’s travels to Iran, the combining of Iranian and Western music, the outreach that is an essential and special part of Stay Close and the beginnings of the rehearsal process for the first project concert at the V&A on 11th April by reading the full International Arts Manager article here.

Soosan-Lolavar

(Written on April 1, 2014 )