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In today’s classical news: Roman Totenberg’s stolen Stradivarius is reintroduced by Mira Wang, and PRS for Music celebrates the first birthday of its Member Anti-Piracy System. Duelling’ violin brothers Vladimir & Anton discuss the lost art of classical improvisation. Researchers have found that accelerometers in smart devices can be hacked using sound waves. Are non-profits a sustainable system for classical music?

The Times 

Conductor more minor than Barenboim

Daniel Barenboim first conducted an orchestra at the age of 12 while Sir Simon Rattle was 13.

Rhinegold

PRS for Music announces anti-piracy successes

PRS for Music is celebrating the first birthday of its Member Anti-Piracy System (MAPS), which allows music creators to remove their repertoire from unlicensed online services and platforms.

Robert Murray withdraws from ENO’s Partenope

Robert Murray has withdrawn from ENO’s production of Partenope following a fall. He is suffering from severe concussion and has been advised to rest as far as possible.

Cmuse

Harness the Power of Classical Music: Five Reasons Why Classical Music should be on your Playlist

Classical music is powerful, and that’s no secret. May it be playing the piano, a Cremona violin perhaps, or cello amongst others, there’s always a certain beauty in putting together a beautiful piece and making a whole music out of it.

Pizzicato

Plagiatsvorwurf gegen designierten Wiener Staatsopernchef

Bogdan Roscic, dem designierten Intendant der Wiener Staatsoper wird vorgeworfen, sich in einer Arbeit über Theodor Adorno, mit der er 1988 in Wien promovierte, des Plagiats schuldig gemacht zu haben.

Music Business Worldwide

Deezer strikes major partnership with french retailer FNAC

Interesting news out of France: The market’s No.1 physical music retailer, FNAC, is getting into bed with its No.1 streaming music provider, Deezer.

Classic FM

How do you memorise music?

The Norwegian Chamber Orchestra first played a piece of music from memory in 2010. It was Grieg’s five-part Holberg Suite. And while it was normal to see soloists performing from memory, it was something else to see a whole orchestra without music.

Musicalchairs

Is nonprofit the best way to do classical music?

Is non-profit status a good thing for classical music? It’s the standard model in the United States, but does that mean it’s the best model?

The Guardian 

The Damnation of Faust review – Liverpool Phil moves from loftiest speculation to the lowliest taverns

Berlioz’s “dramatic legend” eludes any single genre – is it a philosophical oratorio? An opera of the imagination? A macabre, metaphysical satire featuring lowbrow songs about fleas and a eulogy to a dead rat?

The Strad

Whatever happened to improvisation in classical music?

‘Duelling’ violin brothers Vladimir & Anton grew up surrounded by Romani music and use a variety of Romani techniques in their performances – including writing their own variations and cadenzas. Here they discuss the lost art of classical improvisation.

The New York Times

Misha Mengelberg, Bold and Spirited Jazz Pianist, Dies at 81

Misha Mengelberg, a Dutch pianist and composer who approached the jazz tradition with an adventurous spirit and an antic sense of humor, died on March 3 in Amsterdam. He was 81.

The Washington Post 

Roman Totenberg’s stolen Stradivarius was once lost forever. Now, it plays again.

No two Strads are alike, they say, but the violin that Mira Wang reintroduced to the world Monday night is truly special. It was gone for decades, stolen after a concert in 1980, and its owner, Roman Totenberg, died in 2012 thinking it would never be seen again.

Pitchfork

Music Can Be Used to Hack Phones, Computers, and Cars, New Research Shows

“It’s like the opera singer who hits the note to break a wine glass, only in our case, we can spell out words.”

Twitter 

Sound and Music Watch “The Iris Murder” an award winning new chamber opera by Alasdair Nicolson and librettist John Gallas. https://t.co/DsIvOw2Iu0

Classical Music News CD Spotlight. Brilliantly Performed
Image: The Times

(Written on March 15, 2017 )

In today’s news: a guide to newly opened Pierre-Boulez hall, a short profile of baritone Sir Bryn Terfell, and conductor Václav Luks is awarded Mozart Prize, the ICMA trophy revealed in Paris, Cheltenham festival programme for this year announced, New Order at Manchester international Festival, something different: Music tasting of Handel’s compositions, IGC winners 2017, Sirena Huang Awarded 1st Prize at NY Concert Artists Debut Auditions

The Guardian 

Opera for babies joins New Order at Manchester international festival

An opera for babies, Jane Horrocks singing about Lancashire’s cotton industry and New Order reworking their back catalogue with a 12-member synthesiser ensemble are some of the highlights of this summer’s Manchester international festival (MIF).

BBC News

Works to listen to after Handel’s Messiah

With 50-plus recordings, and thousands of performances every year, Handel’s Messiah is, without doubt, one of the most popular works ever written. But does its popularity overshadow other great music? Here are six similar works to explore…

Rhinegold

Cheltenham Festival 2017 programme announced

Highlights include performances by Bryn Terfel, the Hallé, Chineke! Orchestra, the CBSO with Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, anniversary Monteverdi from I Fagiolini and Academy of Ancient Music, a new BBC Young Musician series including Sheku Kanneh-Mason, and the first outing of the Philharmonia’s Virtual Orchestra outside of London.

Pizzicato

New ICMA Trophy Revealed In Paris

Yesterday, with ICMA President Remy Franck attending, the new trophy of the International Classical Music Awards was revealed in Paris.

The Violin Channel 

Young Artist Sirena Huang Awarded 1st Prize at NY Concert Artists Debut Auditions

22 year old VC Young Artist Sirena Huang has been awarded 1st prize at the 2017 New York Concert Artists Worldwide Debut Auditions

The Strad

International Grumiaux Competition for Young Violinists names 2017 prize winners

The tenth International Arthur Grumiaux Competition for Young Violinists, which took place in Brussels, Belgium from 2 to 5 March, has named its 2017 category prize winners.

Der Tagesspiegel

Gibt es noch Karten?

Wer den neu eröffneten Saal sehen will, kann das noch im März tun. Auch für April gibt es Plätze. Für welche Veranstaltungen genau und worauf man sich bei einem Besuch einstellen sollte, verrät unser Autor

concerti

Der sympathische Bösewicht von der britischen Insel

Für den Bariton Sir Bryn Terfel ist nur eine Sache wichtiger als die Musik: seine Familie

kulturradio rbb

Mozartpreis für böhmischen Entdecker

Der tschechische Cembalist und Dirigent Václav Luks erhält den Mozartpreis 2017 der Sächsischen Mozart-Gesellschaft.

musicalchairs

Meurig Bowen delivers stellar Cheltenham Music Festival To mark his 10TH anniversary as director

Commenting on this year’s Festival, Meurig Bowen said: “I am delighted to be celebrating ten years as director of Cheltenham Music Festival. Living here all this time, and culturally connected to the local community, I have come to appreciate Cheltenham’s many discrete, receptive and questioning audiences,…

Construction News

From opera singer to site manager

Having left the Guildhall School of Music & Drama in 2012, I began to take my first steps on the road to what promised to be a successful career as an opera singer.

Twitter

Sound and Music@soundandmusic: This weekend in Manchester – , curated by – Exciting!

klassik.com@klassikcom: Szene aus unvollendeter erklingt in London

 

Image: The Guardian

 

(Written on March 10, 2017 )

 Classical News

In today’s classical news, in order to raise money for young musicians facing challenging circumstances, National Orchestra for All is inviting members of the public to play as part of a professional orchestra. Winners of International Classical Music Awards 2017 have been announced and applications are now open for the 1st Bartok World International Violin Competition, taking place in Budapest, Hungary, later this year. Festival Ultraschall is underway in Berlin, which this year focuses on the voice, and The Elbphilharmonie’s first piano evening featured Mitsuko Uchida. Also, listen to the Konzerthausorchester Berlin’s recreation of the sounds of Berlin.

Classical Music Magazine

NOFA announces Musical Chairs event details

The National Orchestra for All is offering members of the public the chance to play as part of a professional orchestra and raise money for young musicians facing challenging circumstances.

The Violin Channel

Applications Open for Inaugural Bartok World International Violin Competition

Applications are now open for the inaugural 2017 Bartok World International Violin Competition, which is to be held at Budapest, Hungary from September 10th to 17th.

Pizzicato

ICMA Awards 2017: The Winners

The Jury of the International Classical Music Awards (ICMA) today announced the winners for 2017.

CMUSE

Berlin orchestra recreates the sounds of the city

Most classical music fans, when asked their opinion of the sound of Berlin, would likely assume you meant the acoustics in the Berlin Philharmonie or the sound of the city’s world famous Berlin Philharmonic. But, the Konzerthausorchester Berlin has different ideas.

The Strad

Man arrested for throwing mobile phone at orchestral musicians

The Madrid Community Orchestra was performing at National Auditorium of Music in Spain when the incident took place.

Music Teacher Magazine

University of Liverpool launches MA course with Royal Liverpool Philharmonic

The University of Liverpool and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic are launching a new postgraduate course in the business of classical music.

The New York Times

Obama Understood the Power of Art. And He Wanted You to Get It, Too.

Mr. Obama brought all kinds of art and culture into the White House, and he sought culture out.

Broadwayworld

Seoul Philharmonic to Perform Asian Premiere of Rediscovered Work by Stravinsky

The Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra (SPO) presented the program of its subscription concerts on January 20-21, featuring the recently rediscovered work by Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971).

Deutschlandradio Kultur

Die Stimme als Spiegel der Gesellschaft

Ganz im Zeichen der Stimme steht das diesjährige “Ultraschall”-Festival von Deutschlandradio Kultur und RBB-Kulturradio. 14 Veranstaltungen präsentieren das “persönlichste aller Instrumente”: vom Liederabend bis zur experimentellen Performance, sagt Rainer Pöllmann.

Musik heute

Erster Klavierabend in der Elbphilharmonie: Mitsuko Uchida umjubelt

Der erste Klavierabend in der Hamburger Elbphilharmonie ist am Mittwoch vom Publikum gefeiert worden. Mitsuko Uchida, britische Pianistin japanischer Herkunft, spielte im 2.100 Besucher fassenden Großen Saal Werke von Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Robert Schumann und dem zeitgenössischen deutschen Komponisten und Klarinettisten Jörg Widmann.

klassik.com

Goldmünzenschatz in altem Klavier entdeckt

In einem rund 110 Jahre alten Klavier ist im englischen Shrophire ein versteckter Goldmünzenschatz entdeckt worden. Die Entdeckung wurde beim Versuch gemacht, das Instrument zu stimmen.

Twitter

Ultraschall Berlin @UltraschallB Bis heute Abend:Karten gewinnen für Abschlusskonzert am So mit #MarisolMontalvo, @DSOBerlin & #DennisRussellDavies! https://ultraschallberlin.de/kartenverlosung/ …

Music History @today_classical in 1955 Birth of English Simon

Classical Music @ClassicalMusic8 Hitting the right note: the orchestra helping stroke survivors recover – video – The Guardian https://t.co/9vXxhWAw3P

wildkat-pr-icma-2017-winners

Photo: International Classical Music Awards

(Written on January 19, 2017 )

Alle sprechen darüber. In der Klassikwelt gibt es in diesen Tagen kaum ein anderes Thema als das neue Wahrzeichen Hamburgs: Am vergangenen Mittwoch wurde die neue Elbphilharmonie feierlich eröffnet und damit eine neue Ära eingeläutet.

Die Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg © Thies Raetzke

Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg © Thies Raetzke

Die Vorgeschichte

Für viele Diskussionen sorgte die Philharmonie bereits lange vor ihrer Eröffnung. 2001 fanden die ersten Überlegungen über eine neue Konzerthalle auf dem Kaispeicher statt und damit auch der erste Streit über die Finanzierungsfrage. Die Baukosten sollten zum Teil aus öffentlichen Geldern (77 Millionen Euro) und zum anderen Teil von Privatinvestoren getragen werden. 2007 wurde die Grundsteinlegung gefeiert, kurz danach aber schon Verspätungen und Kostenerhöhungen angekündigt. Schließlich verspätete sich die Eröffnung um sieben Jahre und die Gesamtkosten stiegen von 80 auf 800 Millionen Euro. Die wichtigsten Etappen mit Zeitangaben gibt es auf NDR nachzulesen. In ihrem Artikel „Der dunkle Weg zum hellen Glanz“ schrieb die taz: „Die Vorgeschichte [der Elbphilharmonie] ist ein Paradebeispiel dafür, wie man’s nicht macht.“ Kritisiert wurde die anfängliche Leichtgläubigkeit der Politik und der Bürger, die die unrealistischen Vorhaben ignorierten, um stattdessen die Vision der Weltklassearchitekten Herzog & de Meuron zu zelebrieren.

Elbphilharmonie Hamburg, Mai 2011, Dacharbeiten

Elbphilharmonie Hamburg, Mai 2011, Dacharbeiten

Erfüllt die Philharmonie die hohen Erwartungen?

Mit umso größerer Spannung (und Druck!) wurde die Elbphilharmonie am Mittwoch, dem 11. Januar 2017 eröffnet. Dabei lautete die wichtigste Frage: Wird der Saal die versprochene, weltbeste Akustik liefern können?

Am Tag nach der Eröffnung äußerte sich zunächst Manuel Brug (Artikel in der Welt), leider enttäuscht. Der Klang scheint vorerst nicht zu halten, was die Architektur verspricht: „Der Orchestersatz wird komplexer, und auf einmal höre ich nur noch Bässe. Oder Hörner. Und unangenehm aus der Mitte trötende Klarinetten. Der Klang spreizt sich auf, verflacht dann, vieles dringt nicht mehr durch. Es atmet zu wenig, denke ich.“ Liegt es vielleicht daran, dass der Redakteur nicht am richtigen Ort saß? Vielleicht. Jedoch warb man genau damit, dass unabhängig davon, wo der Zuhörer sitzt, jederzeit der beste Klang garantiert sei.

Mit ihrem Artikel „Dieser Konzertsaal kennt keine Gnade“ stößt Eleonore Büning von der FAZ ins selbe Horn. Die Elbphilharmonie sei eine Augenweide, leider höre man nicht mit den Augen: „Dieser Saal, so wunderschön er auch auf den ersten Sinn wirkt (…)– den zweiten Sinn enttäuscht er. Dieser Saal klingt gnadenlos überakustisch.“ Jeder Fehler, jeder tiefe Atemzug, jeder schiefe Bogenstrich und auch die Publikumsgeräusche würden sich in die Musik mischen.

Elbphilharmonie, Grosser Saal, Pausenapplaus am 11.01.2017 © Michael Zapf

Elbphilharmonie, Grosser Saal, Pausenapplaus am 11.01.2017 © Michael Zapf

Obwohl Rabea Weihser in ihrem Artikel für die Zeit die gnadenlose Akustik des Saals ebenfalls bestätigt („Exzellenz im Spiel wird belohnt, Mittelmäßigkeit und Schwächen treten umso deutlicher hervor“), wird das finale Ergebnis gelobt: „ein glasklarer Klang von erstaunlicher dynamischer Bandbreite, überdeutlich in den Akzenten, voll und weich im Tutti“.

Ebenfalls begeistert schrieb Frederik Hanssen vom Tagesspiegel: Trotz eines schlechten Platzes (in höchster Höhe hinter dem Orchester), ist der Klang fantastisch. Dank des einzigartigen Schallbrechers, der „wie ein Ufo durchs Deckengewölbe dringt“ werden die Töne des Orchesters beispielhaft reflektiert: „Selbst das feinste Pianissimo hat hier noch eine enorme Präsenz. Klarheit und Wärme verbinden sich auf ideale Weise, das Blech entfaltet festlichen Glanz, die Streicher sind brillant, ohne allzu poliert zu wirken, und selbst bei voller Orchesterpower entsteht nie der Eindruck des Wuchtigen.“

Reinhard Brembeck von der Süddeutsche Zeitung sieht die Schwäche nicht in der Akustik des Saales: „Bei Mendelssohn und Brahms wird nach und nach deutlich, dass dieses Defizit nicht der Saalakustik anzulasten ist, sondern Hengelbrock und seinen Musikern.“

Doch letztlich ist die Frage der Akustik eine Frage des persönlichen Gefühls jedes Einzelnen. Der Akustiker der Elbphilharmonie, Yasuhisa Toyota sagt: „Mit der Akustik ist es ähnlich wie mit Whiskey: Selbst Experten können nicht erklären, warum der eine gut schmeckt und der andere nicht.“

Parallel dazu fragte sich die Presse (wie z.B. die Welt in ihrem Artikel „Die Elbphilharmonie beendet eine andere große Ära“), was aus der Laeiszhalle wird, die bis jetzt die begehrteste Stelle für Klassikliebhaber in Hamburg war. Optimal ist der Saal zwar nicht mehr, jedoch wird die künstlerische Leitung versuchen, durch ein neues Programm mit u.a. mehr Weltmusik und Jazz die Zuhörer weiterhin zu locken.

Thomas Hengelbrock / Hanna-Elisabeth Müller / Wiebke Lehmkuhl / Pavol Breslik / Sir Bryn Terfel © Michael Zapf

Thomas Hengelbrock / Hanna-Elisabeth Müller / Wiebke Lehmkuhl / Pavol Breslik / Sir Bryn Terfel © Michael Zapf

Und was sagt Europa dazu? Einblicke in die ausländische Presse

Auch im Ausland sorgt die Elbphilharmonie für Bewunderung und Kritik. Doch interessiert sich die Presse weniger für die Akustik-Frage, als vielmehr für das Gesamtprojekt und die Bedeutung des Saales für die Stadt.

Das gewagte Programm, mit einem Potpourris aus Werken der Romantik, des Barocks und der Neuen Musik, wirkt laut France musique kohärent und sehr gut umgesetzt. Gelobt wird die Innen- und Außenarchitektur des Gebäudes, die Meisterleistungen in Sachen Tontechnik hervorgebracht hat.

The Guardian wundert sich, dass ein so teures und kontrovers diskutiertes Projekt von der Politik und Gesellschaft schlussendlich so gut empfangen wird. Die Anwesenheit von Angela Merkel bis zum Ende der Veranstaltung sieht die Zeitung als Zeichen dafür, wie wichtig die Kultur und die Investition in Kunst für Deutschland ist.

Für The New York Times hat das Gebäude das Potential, einen „Bilbao-Effekt“ auszulösen. Die Zeitung spielt dabei auf die baskische Stadt Bilbao an, die heute dank des einzigartigen Designs des Guggenheim-Museums Touristen aus der ganzen Welt anzieht. Laut des Redakteurs wird die größte Herausforderung für das Gebäude sein, für alle einen Platz zu schaffen. Neben dem Anspruch, Musik zugänglicher zu machen, sollten Bildungsprojekte Vorrang haben, die weiteren gesellschaftlichen Zielen dienen, so z.B. der Integration von Flüchtlingen durch Konzerte, die Einwohner und Zugezogene zusammenbringen können.

El Pais macht einen kurzen Vergleich zwischen der Baustelle des Berliner Flughafens BER und der Elbphilharmonie. Beide seien Beweise dafür, dass die deutsche Effizienz nicht immer das ist, was es in der Theorie vorgibt zu sein. Trotz der Länge des Abends, der insgesamt über viereinhalb Stunden dauerte, wird die Akustik des Raumes und das gewagte Programm der musikalischen Leitung gelobt.

Großer Saal / Die "weiße Haut" der Decke © Oliver Heissner

Großer Saal / Die “weiße Haut” der Decke © Oliver Heissner

Kreativität in den Sozialen Medien

Viel Aufmerksamkeit erreichte die Elbphilharmonie auch in den Sozialen Medien, wobei es eher selten ist, dass Projekte aus der klassischen Musikwelt so viele Leute engagieren und gleichermaßen viel Kreativität in den Sozialen Medien hervorrufen.

Lohnenswert ist das Twitter-Konto der Elbphilharmonie @elbphilharmonie, das unzählige Einblicke in die Gebäude-Geheimnisse, in das Orchester und in die Vorbereitungen der Eröffnung gibt. Viele lustige Videos feiern die baldige Premiere, wie beispielsweise das Countdown Video Sounddown in yellow. Insgesamt ein gelungenes Story Telling, das sich zum Nachlesen empfiehlt.

Kreativ werden auch die Redaktionen vieler Rundfunkanstalten. Der SWR 2 glaubt, überall die Form der Elbphilharmonie zu sehen, sogar in Schokoladentafeln. BR Klassik hingegen transportiert die Elbphilharmonie mit einem lustigen, mithilfe von Photoshop bearbeiteten Video nach Bayern. In einem Video von NDR freuen sich die Musiker des NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchesters über den schönsten Weg zur Arbeit. Über Deutschland hinaus werden Meldungen mit einem Augenzwinkern aus dem Ausland gesendet, so z.B. aus Island. Außerhalb der Musikwelt erfährt das Projekt aber auch viel Kritik, insbesondere wegen der vermeintlich unfairen Verteilung von Staatsgeldern.

Einen sehr guten Überblick über die Debatte in den Sozialen Medien rund um die Elbphilharmonie liefert ein kürzlich erschienener Artikel von Crescendo.

Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg © Maxim Schulz

Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg © Maxim Schulz

(Written on January 17, 2017 )

2016 – what a year it has been! 

It’s been a year full of political and cultural changes and we look forward what 2017 holds in store. 

We have also had to adapt WildKat’s set up and services towards the current climate. Artists and organisations, as well as independent projects, look for even more value for money, and for smarter, more effective approaches towards reaching audiences. 2016 is the year we truly went into number crunching, exploring what and how coverage converts into ticket sales, which platform drives different types of traffic, what will guarantee a sell-out and what is worth an investment for the future. 

We have brought in a new set of Account Managers and created new roles to cater to a renewed interest in broader press and online targets. 

I am optimistic about 2017. Change always means opportunity. It means we are in motion, and the arts are the first place we will see that. I look forward to new pieces being created, new companies being formed and new ideas coming to fruition.

Thank you to all our partners, clients, journalists and the wonderful staff across all our WildKat offices. We finish the year on a high with our annual skiing trip to Austria! Let’s slide merrily into the New Year.

Managing Director, Kat Alder

Processed with VSCO with a6 preset

Photo of London Team

In 2016, WildKat PR continued to expand our roster with lots of diverse projects and campaigns, from Ancient Academy of Music to Metal’s production of Steve Reich’s Different Trains with the London Contemporary Orchestra. We also worked with a wide range of fantastic organisations on unique projects, including projects with The European Union Youth Orchestra, Help Musicians UK and Live Music Now. Also, across the Atlantic Ocean in our New York office, we began campaigns with the world-renowned The Cliburn and Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra.

WildKat

Here are some highlights from our fantastic year:

In Spring 2016, Sacconi Quartet and Sacconi Chamber Music Festival returned to WildKat, and it was another very successful year for them, highlights include a 5-star review by The Guardian and also an awesome review by Financial Times. They also premiered Jonathan Dove’s ‘In Damascus’, a brand new work for Tenor and String Quartet.

Photo: Emilie Bailey

In Summer 2016, another year, another weird and wonderful set of Tête a Tête performances, including Toni Castells‘ ‘2045: The Year Man Becomes Immortal?‘, which featured in The Guardian‘s top classical picks, and on BBC Radio 3: In Tune, amongst other outlets. They also ran six productions, forming part of the Cubitt Sessions at the heart of King’s Cross this year. Looking ahead to 2017, lots are going to happen in January with Tête a Tête, so keep reading our blog to follow their latest news!

Photo: Tête a Tête

In August, BitterSuite launched their crowd-funding campaign on Kickstarter, and successfully reached their target. They were featured in Vice, and they also debuted in New York at Brooklyn Academy of Music in December.

Photo: BitterSuite

In Autumn 2016, we worked with Metal Liverpool on Steve Reich’s Different Trains. We gained a huge range of alternative coverage, including The Sunday Times, live-streaming on Boiler Room, and BBC Radio 6 Music.

wildkat-pr-martin-godwin-steve-reich-composer-007

Photo: Martin Godwin

In Winter 2016, Ailie Robertson‘s classical debut single ‘Haven’ was a big hit, reaching No.2 on iTunes Classical Chart. She also made appearances on BBC Radio Scotland and BBC Radio 3: In Tune.

wildkat-pr-ailie-haven

The Academy of Ancient Music received a very strong set of reviews for our first concert with them, recording 4 and 5 stars.  They also continue to receive excellent reviews for their disc of music by Dario Castello, which proves to be increasingly popular following the concert and broadcast and is encouraging in supporting their aim to bring neglected music to a wider audience.  We now very much look forward to the release of the second volume in 2017.

wildkat-pr-front_cover-aam

Accentus Music also has had an incredible year with us, with over 50 pieces of coverage throughout the year, and several productions nominated in several categories for the International Classical Music Awards 2017, including a CD by the Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra and Alban Berg’s opera ‘Wozzeck’ DVD performed by Opernhaus Zürich. We look forward to further collaborations with Accentus in the new year.

wildkat-pr-berg-wozzeck

Photo: Accentus Music/ Berg Wozzeck

We also had a great year with Dartington – this year’s festival saw musicians, writers and artists of all ages and abilities descend upon the beautiful medieval Dartington estate, to take part in courses, watch and participate in masterclasses, create new works, and attend concerts and performances, of which there were over eighty over the four week period!  We are excited to have the chance to work with them again for their International Summer School and Festival 2017, which promises to be just as, if not even more exciting.

wildkat-pr-dartington

Besides our usual Press and Promotion service, we are also developing a wider range of services. We introduced our full Social Media packages and more Creative Campaigns.

We have recently worked with ECC100, a vinyl-only record label founded by Lush, on their release of ‘Set in Stone‘, music inspired by ancient stone circles in Dorset, UK. As well as a press campaign, we also organised a creative campaign, inviting journalists and bloggers to travel on a journey through their senses, with fragrances created by Gorilla Arthouse, which were inspired by the music from the album, live performance from Simon Richmond and John Metcalfe, and the screening of a film by Patrick Dunn.

wildkat-pr-set-in-stone

Photo: ECC100

Now that the year is almost over, we are very much looking forward to announcing new partnerships in January 2017! To follow our latest news and updates, keep reading WildKat PR Blog, or follow us on our Facebook page and Twitter.

Have a very Merry Christmas and a great start to 2017!

(Written on December 21, 2016 )

WildKat PR wishes Steve Reich a very Happy Birthday today!

wildkat-pr-martin-godwin-steve-reich-composer-007Photo: Martin Godwin

 

WildKat PR recently worked with Steve and Metal Liverpool on their “Different Trains” project, which took place last week. The performance was given a five-star review by The Times, who described the performance as “an exuberant, sometimes dark blend of music and film — this was a superb performance of one of Steve Reich’s most poignant works.” “Different Trains” was performed as an open-air concert at Metal’s Liverpool home at Edge Hill station, the oldest active passenger railway station in the world, with a film accompaniment, which was  a newly commissioned work by artist and filmmaker Bill Morrison. Take a look at Steve’s interview with the London Contemporary Orchestra on Boiler Room, where he talked about the production.

Besides the Different Trains project, Steve also collaborated with The Royal Ballet’s Resident Choreographer, Wayne McGregor, to create a new one-act work, in celebration of Reich’s 80th birthday as well as Wayne McGregor’s ten years as Resident Choreographer at Royal Opera House. The world premiere performance will take place in November 2016. For more details about the performances, please refer to ROH’s website.

In addition, Steve Reich recently collaborated with Kristjan Järvi on his Sound Project and released a double CD “Steve Reich Duet,” in celebration of Reich’s 80th birthday.

Steve Reich will also be presenting his works with the Barbican. “Steve Reich’s music changed the way we hear our world,” as said by the Barbican. In his 80th birthday year, the Barbican begins a year-long celebration, with Britten Sinfonia launching the festivities with the European premiere of his work “Pulse”: just part of an evening of music and visuals that demonstrates his profound engagement with the events of our time: air travel, atomic testing, and genetic engineering. Visit the Barbican’s website for more details.

 

wildkat-pr-steve-reich

Photo: WildKat PR. Steve speaks with Radcliffe and Maconie for their BBC 6Music show

 

“Without Steve Reich’s rhythms, pulses and phasing, contemporary culture would be a much poorer place,” says the Guardian. Reich has given the contemporary musical world a licence to groove. He created a model of a self-sustaining ensemble, Steve Reich and Musicians, to play, record and remain a living laboratory for his music, and he has inspired musicians from Michael Gordon to Nico Muhly, from Björk to DJ Spooky. And that means that we all live in a Reichian musical world.

WildKat is also very excited to work with Berlin-based label, FILM, on their release of Reich’s “Six Pianos,” with pianists Gregor Schwellenbach, Volker Bertelmann alias Hauschka, John Kameel Farah, Erol Sarp from Grandbrothers, as well as Daniel Brandt and Paul Frick from the techno ensemble Brandt Brauer Frick, read more about it here.

(Written on October 3, 2016 )

WildKat PR are excited to announce our new client BitterSuite!

“BitterSuite symphonies allow you to remain powerfully in the moment by teasing your senses in time with the music…This is a concert where you don’t just listen to the music – you taste it, smell it and feel it as well.” Lyndsey Winship, The Guardian

BitterSuite are exploring how to re-imagine the classical concert through the use of all of the senses. Inspired by graphic notation and synaesthesia, Creative Producer Stephanie Singer created the company to explore new ways of thinking about and approaching classical music. Their concerts are intimate: audience members are blindfolded and led by a performer through a personal multi-sensory experience.

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Collaboration is key to BitterSuite’s ethos – partnerships to date include creating a multi-sensory experience by and for deaf and blind audiences with Sense UK, and engaging vulnerable young people and disadvantaged communities through workshops using innovative sensory techniques. All their performances have sold out including venues such as Vaults in London, Wilderness 2015, Nesta’s Future Fest 2015, Arcola Theatre, Round House 2015 and Rich Mix London. Their next concert will be on 23rd July at The Other Art Fair in Bristol. Further performances will be at  Wilderness Festival, Old Truman Brewery London and Brooklyn Academy of Music.

BitterSuite_Concert

Keep up to date with news from BitterSuite through their websiteTwitter, Facebook, Instagram and, as always, through the WildKat PR blog.

(Written on June 20, 2016 )

In today’s news, the BBC is calling for amateur musicians to perform at the Proms, the New York City Opera announces its first full season following its emergence from bankruptcy & Graham Parker announced to become the new president of Universal Classics USA. Also, Spotify surged 80% last year to nearly €2bn and Yamaha offers free Clavinova lessons.

BBC News

Amateur musicians to play Last Night of the Proms

The BBC is calling for amateur musicians to perform Bizet’s Toreador song, from Carmen, at the Proms. A “virtual orchestra” will be created to play the piece, conducted by Marin Alsop and supported by musicians from the Royal Academy of Music.

Daily Mail

NYC Opera announces 1st full season after bankruptcy

The revived New York City Opera announced its first full season following its emergence from bankruptcy, planning 28 performances of six works in 2016-17 that include the U.S. debut of Antonio de Literes’ “Los Elementos” and area premieres of Peter Eotvos’ “Angels in America” and Tobin Stokes’ “Fallujah.”

WQXR

Graham Parker, WQXR GM, to Head Universal Classics, USA

Tuesday morning, the general manager at WQXR, Graham Parker, announced that after six years at New York Public Radio, he will be stepping down to become the president of Universal Classics, U.S.A. Music.

The Guardian

Spotify revenues surge 80% to more than £1.5bn

Revenues at Spotify, the world’s biggest music streaming service, surged 80% last year to nearly €2bn (£1.5bn) but losses widened as it invested heavily amid tough competition from the likes of Apple Music and Tidal.

Classical Music Magazine

Yamaha offers free Clavinova lessons

Yamaha is offering free 45-minute Clavinova lessons throughout Saturdays and Sundays in June. During each one-to-one session, a Yamaha pianist will demonstrate the features of the Clavinova which can help pianists to learn and improve.

The Irish Times

Classical music: Printed programmes are a convention worth keeping

The world of the classical concert is a highly ritualised affair. The dress code for performers is as formal as it is for weddings, although there are, of course, performers who shun it. Austrian pianist Friedrich Gulda took shunning to an extreme when he once appeared on stage nude.

Classicalite

New Book ‘Sounds and Sweet Airs’ Details Female Composers Consigned to Oblivion

Anna Beer’s new book, Sounds and Sweet Airs: The Forgotten Women of Classical Music, highlights overlooked but important female composers of the classical music genre.

The Telegraph

Royal Opera’s Oedipe is yet another revived gem to thank Kasper Holten for

Those who deplore the current vogue for shock-horror productions may be rejoicing at the early departure next year of the Royal Opera’s Director Kasper Holten, but there are several things to thank him for – notable among them being his commitment to programming fully staged performances of significant but unjustly neglected repertory of the 20th century.

Musik heute

Berliner Philharmoniker und Simon Rattle kämpfen für EU-Jugendorchester

Das Orchester in Berlin und sein Chefdirigent in München – gleich doppelt haben die Berliner Philharmoniker am Dienstag gegen eine Auflösung des European Union Youth Orchestra (EUYO) protestiert.

Klassikinfo.de

Große Abwanderung beim Bayerischen Staatsballett

Nach dem Ende der Spielzeit 2015/2016 wird Ivan Liška nach 18 Jahren sein Amt als Direktor des Bayerischen Staatsballetts an Igor Zelensky übergeben. Mit Liška werden sich einige bekannte Gesichter von der Bühne des Nationaltheaters und vom Münchner Publikum verabschieden.

Klassik.com

Nordrhein-Westfalen fördert Musikhochschule Detmold mit 14 Millionen Euro

Das Land Nordrhein-Westfalen fördert die Hochschule für Musik Detmold in den nächsten sieben Jahren mit rund 14 Millionen Euro.

Twitter

Top Classical News @topcmnews Bad news for Boston criticism

Classic FM @ClassicFM The 12 cellists of the Berlin Philharmonic are playing tangos on our Album of the Week:

BR_Klassik @BR_KLASSIK 25. Mai 1887: Die Opéra-Comique in Paris steht in Flammen

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Photograph: AFP / Getty Images

(Written on May 25, 2016 )

In our news today, Royal Philharmonic Society (RPS) has announced the winners of its 2016 awards for live music, awarding a car park orchestra one of the top prizes. Three core team members at Ingpen & Williams will leave over the next few months, and Graham Vick comments that opera’s need to break out of their comfort zone to recruit new audiences.

BBC News

Car park orchestra wins classical award

An orchestra that plays in a multi-storey car park in south London has won a top prize at the prestigious Royal Philharmonic Society Music Awards. The Multi-Story Orchestra was praised for its “ingenuity and impact in the local community” as it picked up the audience engagement prize.

Classical-music.com

Royal Philharmonic Society Awards announced

The Royal Philharmonic Society (RPS) has announced the winners of its 2016 awards for live music at a ceremony this evening at The Brewery, London, hosted by Radio 3 presenters Sara Mohr-Pietsch and Suzy Klein and presented by Canadian baritone Gerald Finley.

Classical Music Magazine

Major changes at Ingpen & Williams

Three core team members at Ingpen & Williams will leave over the next few months.

The Guardian

Opera companies urged to break out of ‘ghetto’ to find new audiences

Opera companies need to get out of their “ghetto” where they are protected by concepts of excellence and artistic integrity and find new audiences on their own ground, the director Graham Vick has told a gathering of the movers and shakers of Britain’s classical music world.

Music Week

Freddie Mercury scholarship at ACM announced

The Academy of Contemporary Music (ACM) and Metropolis Studios have announced the introduction of a Freddie Mercury Scholarship, backed by Queen’s Roger Taylor and Brian May. The award will be presented later this year, in honour of the singer’s 70th birthday on September 5.

Classic FM

Man plays Eiffel Tower like a monumental drum kit for his new percussion piece

An American composer is embarking on a new project, harnessing the sounds of the Eiffel Tower in his latest composition. ‘Tower Music’ by Joseph Bertolozzi uses sounds created by hitting different surfaces of the iconic landmark with mallets.

pizzicato

Libeskind To Present A Unique Concert Project in Frankfurt

Architect Daniel Libeskind has developed a very special concert project for Frankfurt: On May 21 and 22, One Day in Life will present more than 75 individual concert events at 18 locations in Frankfurt, featuriung 18 basic conditions of life.

Die Welt

Pollini-Konzertbesucher buhen Flüchtling aus

Beim Konzert der Klavierlegende Mauricio Pollini in der Hamburger Laeiszhalle kam es zum Eklat: Der Darbietung eines 18-jährigen Flüchtlings aus Afghanistan über religiöse Unfreiheit folgten Buh-Rufe.

Musik heute

Rundfunkchor Berlin startet Lounge-Konzerte

Der Rundfunkchor Berlin startet in der Saison 2016/17 eine Reihe mit Lounge-Konzerten. An drei Abenden kann das Publikum mit Chormitgliedern und wechselnden Gästen ins Gespräch kommen, teilte der Klangkörper am Dienstag in Berlin mit.

nmz

Musik als Dauerzustand, als Lebensgarantie

Am 11. Mai jährt sich der Todestag Max Regers zum 100. Mal. Susanne Popp, Leiterin des Max-Reger-Instituts Karlsruhe, hat aus diesem Anlass eine knapp 550 Seiten starke Biographie bei Breitkopf & Härtel vorgelegt.

Twitter

Bamberg Symphony @bambergsymphony  baton has been glued several times – he simply won’t give it up

TownHallSymphonyHall @THSHBirmingham  Conductor of the Year goes to…! See you in May 2017 with

Top Classical News @topcmnews How to be HIP – from listening to Adelina Patti to an 18th century Scots dance band

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Photograph: Amber Vernuccio

(Written on May 11, 2016 )

Classical News

In today’s news, a video of an opera singer performing during a scan revealed, NHS choir that beat Justin Bieber to the UK’s Christmas number one spot in 2015 signs film deal & Glastonbury’s Pyramid Stage will be decorated with a giant lightning bolt in tribute to David Bowie.

The Telegraph

Real-time MRI captures incredible video of opera singer performing during scan

Researchers at the Freiburger Institute for Musician’s Medicine have revealed what really goes on inside an opera singer’s mouth when they perform.

BBC News

NHS choir signs film deal after topping chart at Christmas

The NHS choir that beat Justin Bieber to the UK’s Christmas number one spot in 2015 has signed a film deal to tell its story. The Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Choir beat the Canadian singer after he urged his 72 million Twitter followers to buy its charity single, A Bridge Over You.

Glastonbury to honour David Bowie and Prince

Glastonbury’s Pyramid Stage will be decorated with a giant lightning bolt in tribute to David Bowie, organiser Emily Eavis has told the BBC. The metal sculpture, inspired by the sleeve for Bowie’s Aladdin Sane album, will hang above acts like Coldplay and Adele when they play the stage in June.

The Guardian

The best classical concerts and opera of summer 2016

Oedipus finally reaches Britain, there’s a Messiaen marathon in Suffolk, Opera North’s Ring hits the road – and John Luther Adams summons up a deluge.

The Strad

Banff International String Quartet Competition 2016 names 10 shortlisted ensembles

The 12th Banff International String Quartet Competition has named the 10 string quartets shortlisted to take part in its live rounds.

Classical Music Magazine

Monteverdi Choir & Orchestras announce plans to mark Monteverdi’s 450th anniversary

The ensembles will present L’Orfeo, Il ritorno d’Ulisse in patria and L’incoronazione di Poppea in concert performances. They will also perform the Vespers at Basilica dei Frari, Venice, as well as working alongside musicologists and experts in Monteverdi during the anniversary year.

Roger Vignoles announced as accompanist for 2016 International Opera Awards

Roger Vignoles will be accompanist at the 2016 International Opera Awards ceremony, which will take place on 15 May at the Savoy Theatre. He will accompany Stuart Skelton, Anna Bonitatibus and a number of other past and present International Opera Awards finalists and winners.

The Spectator

Royal Opera’s Tannhäuser is one of the ugliest stagings I have set eyes on

Cursed, or perhaps blessed, with almost no visual memory at all, I had almost completely forgotten what the Royal Opera’s current Tannhäuser, directed by Tim Albery and with set designs by Michael Levine, looks like. Or perhaps it was the natural tendency to repress the memory of unpleasant experiences.

Klassik Heute

Dirigentenwettbewerb “The Mahler Competition” beginnt in Bamberg

Vom 6. bis 13. Mai 2016 veranstalten die Bamberger Symphoniker – Bayerische Staatsphilharmonie zum 5. Mal ihren Dirigentenwettbewerb The Mahler Competition. Der Wettbewerb ist ab der Hauptrunde am 9. Mai öffentlich. Der Eintritt zu den öffentlichen Runden in der Konzerthalle Bamberg ist frei.

Music Heute

Staatstheater Nürnberg: Neue Saison mit Wagner-Opern und Brahms-Konzerten

Die Nürnberger Oper eröffnet die Spielzeit 2016/17 mit Mussorgskis “Boris Godunow” in einer Neuinszenierung von Peter Konwitschny. Zusammen mit Generalmusikdirektor Marcus Bosch realisiert der 71-Jährige das Stück in der Urfassung von 1869, wie das Staatstheater am Mittwoch mitteilte.

Klassik.com

Ensemble Ludus instrumentalis gewinnt Förderpreis Alte Musik

Der Förderpreis Alte Musik, der von der Akademie für Alte Musik im Saarland und dem Saarländischen Rundfunk vergeben wird, geht in diesem Jahr an das in Köln beheimtate Ensemble Ludus Instrumentalis.

Twitter

IntArtsManager @IntArtsManager IAM’s editor is 1 of the 15 women to be selected for the first University Women in the Arts

Royal Opera House @RoyalOperaHouse Król Roger and Woolf Works nominated for South Bank Sky Arts Awards

Bernhard Neuhoff @BernhardNeuhoff Classical music sponsored by Pop stars: donates $ 25,000 to opera house via

EUYO @EUYOtweets Happy 10yr anniversary to our Partner . Looking forward to playing for our friends tonight.

Music News & Facts @musicnews_facts Today is the 28th birthday of a massively successful act and an outstanding singer/song-writer.

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Photograph: FIMM

 

(Written on May 5, 2016 )