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In today’s news: Tory MP Bernard Jenkin urges visa deal for EU musicians, possible improvement on school results by extra music lessons, and the hearing and visually impaired to get captions through smart glasses in National Theatre trial. Composer Klaus Huber has died, successful 31st edition of music festival “Niedersächsische Musiktage”, and Berlin State Opera is officially re-opened.

BBC News

New music ‘at risk’ through music education ‘neglect’ in England

The success of British music is at risk because the subject is being neglected in schools, says the head of UK Music.

Tory MP Bernard Jenkin urges visa deal for EU musicians

Eurosceptic Conservative MP Bernard Jenkin has urged the UK government to guarantee free movement for top EU musicians after Brexit.

The Guardian

How to improve the school results: not extra maths but music, loads of it

A Bradford primary school wants the world to know its newfound Sats success is down to giving all children up to six hours of music a week.

Musical Instrument Professional

‘Every child has a right to music education’ – ISM launches Primary Music Toolkit

The ISM Trust, supported by the Schools Music Association (SMA), has commissioned the Primary Music Toolkit to help primary school teachers further their self-assurance in teaching music in the classroom.

The Times

Deaf to get captions through smart glasses in National Theatre trial

Smart glasses are being tried out by the National Theatre in an attempt to make performances accessible to the hearing and visually impaired.

Limelight

Nominations for the 2017 ARIA Fine Arts Awards announced

Slava Grigoryan and ABC Music’s labels dominate the nominations, while a Kate Miller-Heidke inclusion raises eyebrows.

Pizzicato

Three French orchestras collaborate for the employment of an assistant conductor

Three French orchestras, Orchestre de Picardie, Orchestre National d’Île-de-France and Orchestre National de Lille have signed a partnership for the common employment of an assistant conductor.

Zeit Online

Komponist Klaus Huber gestorben

Klaus Huber war einer der letzten Großen der modernen Zwölftonmusik. Jetzt ist der Schweizer Komponist, Dirigent und Geiger mit 92 Jahren in Perugia gestorben.

Klassik Heute

31. Niedersächsische Musiktage erfolgreich abgeschlossen

Die 31. Niedersächsischen Musiktage beschäftigten sich vom 2. September bis 1. Oktober 2017 mit dem Thema „Raum“.

KlassikInfo.de

Wiedereröffnung der Berliner Staatsoper

Wiedereröffnung der Staatsoper Unter den Linden am Tag der Deutschen Einheit mit der Premiere von »Zum Augenblicke sagen: Verweile doch!« mit Robert Schumanns »Szenen aus Goethes Faust« unter der musikalischen Leitung von Generalmusikdirektor Daniel Barenboim und in der Regie von Intendant Jürgen Flimm.

Twitter

3sat Kulturzeit @kulturzeit

Dirigent Kent Nagano und Intendant Georges Delnon bleiben bis 2025 an der :

Klaus Huber © Charlotte Oswald/dpa

 

Merken

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(Written on October 4, 2017 )

 

Classical News

In today’s news, the arts world is being love-blitzed by government ministers, and The Arts Desks discusses music in other cultures. Also, the Sir Karl Jenkins Music Award 2016 is launched, and interviews with Andrea Bocelli and Andrew Shore

The Times

Richard Morrison: Finally the arts world is being love-blitzed by government ministers

David Cameron isn’t the only Tory rushing to seize the centre ground with a show of cuddly, caring conservatism. After years in which his party huffed and puffed about the importance of youngsters getting qualifications in “hard” academic disciplines, the arts world is suddenly being love-blitzed by his education ministers

Telegraph

Andrea Bocelli: ‘It’s beautiful to sing for everybody’

If Andrea Bocelli had his way, he would never speak, only sing. So it seems almost unfair to subject him to an interview

The Guardian

Baritone Andrew Shore: from baring all for Beckmesser, to toupees and timing

He’s always wanted to play a panto dame, eyebrows are crucial, and the best singers are those that simply listen to the music. The great buffo-baritone talks us through some of his greatest comic roles for English National Opera

The Arts Desk

Extract: The Other Classical Musics

Michael Church prefaces a collection of essays on the Great Tradition in different cultures

Classical Music Magazine

Royal College of Music development gets green light

The Royal College of Music (RCM) has been granted planning permission for the development of its site on Prince Consort Road

Classic FM

Sir Karl Jenkins Music Award 2016 launched

The Arts Club has announced details of this year’s Sir Karl Jenkins Music Award 2016

Der Tagesspiegel 

Der Nachwuchs kommt aus Fernost

Alle Finalisten spielten beim Max-Rostal-Wettbewerk an der Universität der Künste das gleiche Werk. Gewonnen hat nur einer: Diyang Mei aus China

Concerti

„Heute will sich das Publikum amüsieren“

Nikolai Lugansky gilt als Exponent der russischen Klavierschule, er selber will von solchen Klassifizierungen jedoch nichts wissen

Pizzicato 

Rare Mozart Letter Sold For $217,000 At Auction

A rare letter written by Mozart sold for $217,000 according to Boston-based RR Auction. The one-page signed note in German is undated, but was probably written in the summer of 1786 to the composer’s close friend, the great Austrian botanist Nikolaus Joseph von Jacquin

Pacific Standard

Music Is a Potent Source of Meaning

But new research finds younger and older people largely listen for different reasons. The source of music’s power has long been debated, with many psychologists concluding its primary benefit is emotional regulation. For many of us, that has always seemed awfully reductive and recently published research suggests we may be right

Le Figaro

Les Gipsy Kings au patrimoine mondial de l’Unesco?

La rumba catalane, musique emblématique de groupes gitans de Barcelone ou Perpignan comme celui de la famille Reyes, est candidate pour être inscrite sur la liste du patrimoine culturel immatériel des Nations unies

Twitter

Arts Council England ‏@ace_national : #culturematters: share our EDM with your MP, recognising economic impact of arts&culture http://bit.ly/1L1tSW3 

Sinfini Music @SinfiniMusic  : Mr @LudovicoEinaud‘s new album dropped today! We quizzed him about Euclid, Eminem & an extremely full iPhone… http://bit.ly/1LQr2ok 

Classic FM ‏@ClassicFM  :10 pieces of classical music that will change your life: http://classfm.co/tzsPBl  (and all of them are on @composed)

news16oct

The Kyrgyz ensemble Tengir Too/The Arts Desk

 

(Written on October 16, 2015 )

Today, 28th January 2015, the Department for Education published their new plans for the content of GCSE and A Level Music exams to be brought into effect from autumn 2016.

The state of music education has been a hot topic in recent weeks and months and was particularly publicised by pianist James Rhodes’ Channel 4 documentary and subsequent ‘Don’t Stop the Music’ campaign to give every child the opportunity to learn a musical instrument. Fueling the fire, Education Secretary Nicky Morgan, warned in November 2014 against studying arts subjects in favour of science and maths, arguing that the arts would ‘hold them [students] back for the rest of their lives’. Many prominent musicians such as Nicola Benedetti spoke out against this statement.

The main changes to note from today’s announcement is that, at both levels, the dates open to study are being widened from 1700 to 1900 (this narrowness has been widely criticised) to 1650 to 1910.  This means a much large portion of the Baroque period is included and will now account for the beginning of Bach and Handel’s lives who were both born in 1685. Although the Baroque period is usually said to begin in 1600, 1650 is still a much more standardized year to begin musical education than the original guidelines. The same can be said of the additional 10 years at the end of the timeline. Indeed, bringing music education in line with widely recognised facts in the classical music industry is surely only a positive thing. For this development we have ISM’s Protect Music Education campaign to thank.

Interestingly, commentators have also noted that the usual overwhelming focus on the Western Classical Tradition at GCSE and A Level has been changed to include a compulsory study outside of this. As the world, business, finance and politics become more interconnected, understanding other countries’ history and culture is increasing in importance. Part of this is understanding others’ music and I think this change in the curriculum is a good starting point.

Another positive change, although small, is a change of phrasing: ‘performance and composition’ has become ‘performing and composing’. This subtle difference somewhat removes the pressure on the final outcome of recitals and compositions but emphasises the enjoyment of all parts music making: practising, refining, crafting harmony, correcting errors, discovering that pupil’s personal style. Again, ISM’s campaign was successful.

Hopefully these changes will contribute to the widening belief that music education is beneficial and relevant but that it will also encourage more young people to experience the enjoyment of music.

Bass_and_Treble_clef

Photo: Wikipedia

 

(Written on January 28, 2015 )