Posts Tagged ‘tradition’
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Jubiläum in Bamberg: Die Bamberger Symphoniker feiern ihr 70-jähriges Bestehen

Begonnen hat alles vor 70 Jahren durch Flucht und Vertreibung nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg. Musiker des Deutschen Philharmonischen Orchesters Prag waren in Bamberg gestrandet; sie bildeten den Kern des “Bamberger Tonkünstlerorchesters”, das am 20. März 1946 sein erstes Konzert gab, als Bamberger Symphoniker leben sie den Mythos vom besonderen böhmischen Klang weiter.

Kommen Sie doch auch nach Bamberg und schauen sich das Orchester und die Feierlichkeiten aus der Nähe an! Geplant ist folgendes:

An diesem Samstag lädt Bundespräsident Gauck zum Benefizkonzert. Auf dem Programm stehen Mozart, Smetana und natürlich Mahler, für dessen Interpretationen das Ochester berühmt ist.

Oder schalten Sie live ein bei BR Klassik!

Am Sonntag ab 14 Uhr werden zum Tag der offenen Tür die Konzerthalle mit (fast) allen Nebenräumen zur Bühne. Zu erleben sind “Composer in residence” Jörg Widmann als Solist, Orgel- und Oboenkonzerte, alte und neue Filme über die Bamberger Symphoniker, ein “ungarischer Salon”, eine “Tango-Session”, ein “klingendes Museum” und vieles meh.

Weitere Projekte stehen an im Jubiläumsjahr:

Im Mai wird der Preis der Mahler-Competition vergeben. Der Dirigentenwettbewerb findet seit 2004 alle drei Jahre statt  und hat schon Weltkarrieren begründet.

Erleben Sie die Bamberger Symphoniker selbst in den nächsten Konzerten, am 31. März mit Lang Lang und am 04. April dirigiert Jonathan Nott Mahlers Dritte. Auch international kann man sie hören, u.a. auf der nächsten USA-Tournee.

Und ein Film von Deutsche Welle erklärt, wie solch eine Tournee funktioniert und geplant werden muss…

 

 

(Written on March 18, 2016 )

WildKat PR is thrilled to be working with boutique auction house, Beares Auctions on an exciting new campaign.

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Beares Auctions is a boutique auction house specialising in the sale of fine instruments and bows, supported by internationally respected expertise. Beares Auctions complements the unrivalled traditions of  excellence and integrity for which the Queen’s Award winning J & A Beare is known throughout the world. Their auctions offer a limited number of high quality instruments and bows in varying price ranges, but will exclude the large numbers of trade and student instruments found in most other auctions. These instruments are offered at realistic market prices, traditionally associated with auctions. Both buyers and sellers will benefit from the services of the renowned J&A Beare workshop.

The auction house is initiating a really exciting new project that we are looking forward to sharing with you very soon!

Keep up to date with Beares Auctions’ news on their website, Twitter and Facebook.

 

 

(Written on February 12, 2016 )

In early Italian Opera, from the 1600’s until about 1800, many operatic roles were written for castrati. Recently more men have been trained as countertenors to sing these roles, however it is often women who take on these ‘breeches roles’ in the place of castrati.

From the end of the eighteenth century, when composition for castrati had declined, male operatic roles continued to be written for high voices. Thus, it was intended that a woman should dress up as a man to play these characters. It is important to note, that the quality of the voices and music has always come before realism in opera.

Italian castrato Francesco Bernardi Senasino (1686- 1758) Senesino was closely associated with Handel & sung 17 of his lead roles an

Italian castrato Francesco Bernardi Senesino (1686- 1758). Senesino was closely associated with Handel and sung 17 of his lead roles.

Travesti in Italian means disguised and Travesty applies to roles sung by the opposite sex. This term can therefore also apply to ‘skirt roles’, whereby a man sings a female role.

A long list of lead figures in operas are known as ‘breeches roles’ (‘travesti’ or ‘hosenrolle’) .

Here are some of the most well known Travesty roles in opera.

Octavian Der Rosenkavalier, Richard Strauss

Octavian, young lover of the Feldmarschallin Marie Thérèse, is written as a soprano/mezzo-soprano breeches part. Typical of a breeches role, Octavian must disguise as a woman to hide his identity and involvement with Marie Thérèse.

Christa Ludwig as Octavian

Christa Ludwig as Octavian

Romeo I Capuleti e i Montecchi, Donizetti

When assessing the singers for I Capuleti e i Montecchi, Bellini wasn’t particularly impressed with the tenor. However he admired the talents of mezzo-soprano Giuditta Grisi, so he decided to cast Grisi as Romeo in a breeches role.                                                                   

Anna Netrebko and Elina Garanca as Romeo & Julliet, ROH 2009

Anna Netrebko and Elina Garanca as Romeo & Julliet, ROH 2009

Cherubino, Le Nozze di Figaro, Mozart

Cherubino is an adolescent boy and the counts page. As many breeches roles, Cherubino is played by a mezzo-soprano. Similarly to Der Rosenkavalier’s Octavian, Cherubino must disguise himself as a girl. He is a womaniser and woos both Susanna (engaged to Figaro) and Countess Almaviva (married to Count Almaviva).

Other breeches roles in Mozart’s operas, include Sesto and Annino in La clemenza di Tito,  Idamante in Idomeneo and Amintas in Il re pastore.

Joyce DiDonato as Cherubino at the Metropolitan Opera, New York

Joyce DiDonato as Cherubino at the Metropolitan Opera, New York

Composers chose for male characters to be played by women, due to the sound characteristics of their voices and their physique. Female figures are particularly suited to being cast as young boys, as these roles require narrow physiques and light, clear voices. Although today, it is of course perfectly acceptable for women to perform on stage, in the nineteenth century, woman who went on stage were dishonored and had a lower status. Thus, there were cases of women dressing up, pretending to be a castrati men in order to avoid this. Today’s interest and media focus on gender fluidity suggests that there is great scope for opera to flourish, as modern audiences continue to be fascinated by gender roles.

(Written on November 12, 2015 )

Farinelli is perhaps the most well known castrato singer and the new West- End production of Farinelli and the King brings his story back to life for the stage.

Between the 17th and early 20th centuries, many castrati became famous. Indeed, they were the darlings of the opera house; they played prestigious male and female lead roles, and classical composers wrote music specifically for castrati voices.

It is believed the practice was started around 1500, and the number of castrati declined during the 19th century.

Women were banned from the Vatican choir and much church music was written for high voices, therefore castrati were often employed. The unique voice of a castrato combined the pure sound of a boy soprano with the lung capacity of an adult male.

Castrati occupied a middle-ground between male and female, biologically they were male but psychologically and socially they weren’t considered to be men. They were forbidden from marrying, becoming priests or holding political posts.

Alessandro Moreschi was the Church’s last castrato singer, he died in 1922.

Here Alessandro Moreschi sings “Preghiera” by Francesco Paolo Tosti, recorded in the Sistine Chapel in 1902.

(Written on October 19, 2015 )

Classical News

In today’s news, Berlin’s three opera houses celebrate the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Wall, and Brassed Off avoids closure again. Also, Robin Ticciati is appointed music director of the DSO Berlin, and Patten is jailed for murdering pianist Aligizakis

The Guardian

Berlin’s opera weekend: tradition, innovation and orientalism

Berlin’s three opera houses united to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Wall and open their seasons with a trio of new productions by Wagner, Offenbach and Meyerbeer

Classical Music Magazine

Robin Ticciati appointed music director of the DSO Berlin

The Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin has named Robin Ticciati as its new principal conductor and music director

Classic FM

Man jailed for life for ‘senseless and unprovoked’ murder of pianist

Mark Patten (below left), aged 30 of Thornton Heath, London, has been sentenced to a minimum of 17 years in prison for the murder of Menelaos Aligizakis (below right), a talented pianist and teacher, who was killed in a brutal attack outside Waterloo Station on 3 January 2015

The Strad

Every violinist must develop an individual voice, says Aaron Rosand

The American maestro discusses the importance of developing a distinctive tone

The Times

Richard Morrison: why conductor JoAnn Falletta deserves to be the world’s favourite maestro

Thrilling live performances of richly varied music — and more people enticed to experience them — are required

BBC

The Brassed Off band make a comeback after avoiding closure again

The Grimethopre Colliery Band’s fight for survival when the coal mine closed in the early 1990s inspired the 1996 film Brassed Off. The band did survive – and now, enjoying a resurgence, are among the favourites for this weekend’s brass band National Championships

New York Times

Mercedes Bass Is Elected Acting Chairwoman of Carnegie Hall

The philanthropist Mercedes T. Bass was elected the acting chairwoman of Carnegie Hall on Thursday, succeeding Ronald O. Perelman, the billionaire businessman who stepped down from the post after eight month

concerti.de

„Ich wollte keinen weiteren Geiger mehr erziehen“

Deshalb löste Menahem Pressler 2009 das legendäre Beaux Arts Trio auf – die Bühne hat der Pianist dennoch nicht verlassen

KulturPort.de

Zauber der Barockmusik in Europas kleinster Hauptstadt – Valletta International Baroque Festival 2016

Bereits zum vierten Mal wird sich im Januar kommenden Jahres der Vorhang für das Valletta International Baroque Festival öffnen. Vom 16. bis 30. Januar 2016 erwarten Liebhaber barocker Musik in Maltas einzigartiger Hauptstadt Valletta wieder musikalische Perlen des 16. bis 18. Jahrhunderts, aufgeführt von den renommiertesten Barock-Musikern Europas

El Pais

43 Festival Cervantino: cultura y ciencia en México ante la violencia

El mayor evento interartístico de América Latina impulsa el cruce creación-conocimiento. En el discurso de inauguración, el director del Cervantino, Jorge Volpi, hincó el dedo en los problemas sociales y de violencia que arrastra México

Twitter

The Strad‘In spiccato the player is active and the bow is passive: in sautillé the player is passive and the bow is active’

BBC Radio 3: Music seems to be universal and affects almost everyone deeply. asks why:

Sinfini MusicStop press! Video evidence of page turner indisputably saving the day. Time to update this?

news9thoctWrestling with political and national associations … Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg at Staatsoper Berlin. Photograph: Bernd Uhlig/The Guardian

(Written on October 9, 2015 )

Last week, the argument about when to applaud at classical music concerts surfaced yet again in The Telegraph, with Michael Henderson fiercely defending tradition. He concluded by affirming, ‘You buy your ticket, you listen in silence to the music, and at the end, should you feel like it, you applaud’ explaining that ‘Tens of thousands of people have been doing it for the past 120 years.’

But perhaps that’s the problem. Is classical music etiquette stuck in the 1900s? It only takes one trip to the Proms to see a mere scattering of youthful faces in a sea of grey hair.

Violinist Nigel Kennedy is renowned for trying to break the classical mould. He argues in The Telegraph that ‘classical musicians should learn from rock stars to overcome snobbery and engage more with their audiences’ and encourages ‘talking to [audiences] mid-performance and letting them show their appreciation.’

Nigel-Kennedy_2662708b

Credit: AFP/ Telegraph

This is all very well, but poses a distinct possibility of putting off the older generation, thereby risking those all-important bums on seats.

So what is the solution? This is a debate that will no doubt continue for the foreseeable future, and to which there is no simple answer. Either extreme would appear to put the future of classical music in danger.

The only way forward can be a balanced approach – one that provides opportunities for fresh faces to be experience classical music in an accessible environment, whilst maintaining those traditions which have been enjoyed by many generations and will hopefully be enjoyed by many more to come. And integrating these audiences? Well that will be the next challenge.

(Written on August 25, 2015 )

The world is a big place with lots of exciting things to experience, especially in the classical music world. In the spirit of our New Year’s resolutions blog to try new things and set new goals, we were inspired to begin thinking about our classical music ambitions: orchestras we would love to see live, concert halls we want to visit, instruments we aspire to learn. As well as having a think ourselves, we asked you over on our Facebook and Twitter pages to send yours in too. Here they are:

Prom at the BBC Proms

As one of the best classical music festivals in the world, showcasing the best talent, Promming at the Proms is a longstanding tradition and therefore is a musical must. Standing in the arena or galleries offers an atmosphere unrivaled by buying a ticket and sitting. For only £5, you can experience some of the world’s greatest artists. We recommend joining the queue before 16:30 to ensure you get in.

Last night of the Proms

The Last Night of the BBC Proms 2014. Photo: (c) newarktwinning.com

The Last Night of the BBC Proms

Equally, the Last Night of the Proms is a spectacular, patriotic finale to a summer’s worth of music. The first half is a traditional concert whilst, during the second half, the Royal Albert Hall transforms into a sea of flag waving, national anthem singing extravaganza. With favourites such as Rule Britannia, Elgar’s Land of Hope and Glory and Jerusalem sung every year, it’s no wonder tickets are highly sought after and distributed via a ballot each year. Thankfully, Promming is still an option on the Last Night although you will need to get there much earlier than on a regular night!

The 2015 BBC Proms is announced on 23rd April

Go to an Opera or Ballet

Although the prospect of going to an opera or ballet for the first time can seem scary, The Telegraph have written a handy guide to etiquette at such events so you can enjoy the concert and look like a seasoned pro.

Sitting in an orchestra whilst they are playing

Carolin in our Berlin office suggested this great idea. Just imagine watching a pianist’s hands whiz over the keys or feeling the vibrations of the timpani!

Ben Hogwood Tweet

@benjamin23

Go to Carols at Kings

One of our interns, Ruth, said she would like to go to the traditional Nine Lessons and Carols at King’s College Cambridge one Christmas rather than just watching it on television. Guaranteed to get you in the festive mood.

Learn to play an unusual musical instrument

The world is full of violinists, why not take up the Chinese Yangqin?!

YANGQINinstrument-yang-qin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Chinese Yangqin. Photo found at Sonic Adventures

Visit the Philharmonie de Paris

Extremely topical at the moment as it only just opened this week (14th January 2015). Sarah, one of our Account Managers who suggested this, and others interested, should take a look at their upcoming season programme for more details.

Blog Tweet A. Pasquill

@arqasquill

Go to an open air concert

Our founder, Kathleen Alder, suggested this one: going to an open air concert in a beautiful setting such as Scandinavia or somewhere in Iceland. Beethoven under the Northern Lights? Yes please!

Tweet Ben Hogwood

We’ve clearly got a lot to tick off our list! Keep tweeting us @WildKatPR with your suggestions-see you in Paris!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Written on January 16, 2015 )

New York Times

Detroit Symphony Agrees to New Contract With Musicians

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra, which endured a bitter six-month strike a few years ago, settled its latest contract eight months early, orchestra officials announced Wednesday

BBC Music Magazine

HMV closes flagship Oxford Street store

HMV’s flagship store in Oxford Street has been shut down this week. Covering over 60,000 square-feet and set over three floors, the iconic HMV store at 150 Oxford Street has been at the forefront of the company’s UK presence since it was opened in 1986

NPR Music

A Gramophone And Mozart, Or How I Fell For Opera

British conductor Nicholas McGegan celebrates his ‘Beatle’ birthday today (64, that is). To mark the occasion, he recalls how he first fell in love with opera.

The ‘Ode To Joy’ As A Call To Action

Candaele has turned his obsession with Beethoven’s Ninth into a documentary film called Following the Ninth: In the Footsteps of Beethoven’s Final Symphony. He follows the Ninth around the world, to Chile and China, where it became an empowering anthem of solidarity, and to Japan, where performances of daiku — the Great Nine — are a cherished annual tradition.

The New York Times

The Echoes of War, From One Century to the Next

‘Shostakovich for the Children of Syria,’ a Benefit Concert “to promote the awareness of significant international humanitarian crises and other public interest issues”

The Metro

A real-life fairytale: Peter Pan performer proposes to his Wendy on stage

A Peter Pan performer surprised his very own Wendy when he got down on one knee near the end of a packed show in Glasgow

The Metro

The Metro

 

(Written on January 17, 2014 )

BBC News

Stolen Stradivarius violin to be sold

The stolen Stradivarius violin that was taken from Euston station in 2010 is expected to sell for more than £1m when it is sold at auction today

Limelight

Where are all the Aussie chief conductors?

Veteran conductor Patrick Thomas offers some personal thoughts on a native species in danger

Classic FM Online

Watch: trailer for new Elijah Wood Grand Piano movie

A new trailer for Grand Piano, the forthcoming Elijah Wood movie in which he plays a harassed concert pianist, has been unveiled

Truro Cathedral recreates historic carol service

The first ever Nine Lessons and Carols service took place in Truro Cathedral in 1880 – and was recreated last night to celebrate the city’s role in the tradition

New York Times

Deal Gives Philharmonic Musicians Modest Gains

The contract agreement that the New York Philharmonic reached with its musicians last week will keep the music playing at Avery Fisher Hall and spare the city from the kind of bitter labor unrest that has set off damaging strikes and lockouts at other orchestras

Classicalite

Time Out London Kills Classical Music?

According to Norman Lebrecht’s blog over at ArtsJournal.com, Time Out has given notice to classical music. That’s right, Time Out has killed its classical music coverage

The Gazette

Classical music given modern twist

Michael Brailey has just been made principal composer of the National Youth Orchestra (NYO), a major honour. Michael, who lives near Cheriton Bishop in Mid Devon, will compose unique pieces of music for the orchestra of the most talented teenage musicians in the UK

Die Welt

Daniel Hardings Distanz zu deutschen Romantikern

Wer wird Nachfolger von Sir Simon Rattle an der Spitze der Berliner Philharmoniker? Zweiter Teil des Kandidaten-Checks: Diesmal Daniel Harding, der gerade “Szenen aus Goethes Faust” dirigierte

Classic FM

Classic FM

(Written on December 18, 2013 )